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Posted: 10/25/2006 9:00:56 AM EST
I am trying to refinish a Chinese stock. I have removed most of the blemishes, but upon applying Tung Oil and Mineral Spirits, it continues to dry "foggy."

To try to combat it, I sanded those areas down with some extra fine steel wool and attempted to use straight tung oil. Still coming out foggy.

What's up with this?
Link Posted: 10/25/2006 2:03:05 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/25/2006 7:54:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By shotar:
Did you wash the wood down with TSP to get all the old oils and cosmo out first???


Nope... what is TSP?

I thought that with a one to one ratio of OMS (Odorless Mineral Spirits) and tung oil, it would bleed out the old cosmo.

I guess I am wrong? Where can I go from here? I really want to shoot this thing!
Link Posted: 10/26/2006 9:55:52 PM EST
BTT

I still need help.
Link Posted: 10/28/2006 5:26:55 AM EST
TSP=Trisodium Phosphate

It's a heavy duty cleaner and degreaser often used as a deck or siding wash. it removes grease and also opens the pores of the wood for better stain or finish penetration. The downside with using it on a stock is that those open pores then have to be filled which require a filler or several coats of finish with sanding in between each coat.

How humid is it where you live or where your stock is drying? Many finishes will blush in high humidity conditions.

Personally, I prefer to use Tru-oil. It's a linseed oil that drys faster than straight linseed oil. If you wipe it off with a lint free rag an hour and a half to 2 hours after application it gives a nice military satin finish. I've also never had problems with it blushing.

Link Posted: 10/28/2006 10:32:57 AM EST

Originally Posted By DakotaFAL:
TSP=Trisodium Phosphate

It's a heavy duty cleaner and degreaser often used as a deck or siding wash. it removes grease and also opens the pores of the wood for better stain or finish penetration. The downside with using it on a stock is that those open pores then have to be filled which require a filler or several coats of finish with sanding in between each coat.

How humid is it where you live or where your stock is drying? Many finishes will blush in high humidity conditions.

Personally, I prefer to use Tru-oil. It's a linseed oil that drys faster than straight linseed oil. If you wipe it off with a lint free rag an hour and a half to 2 hours after application it gives a nice military satin finish. I've also never had problems with it blushing.



I'll try it. I have the stock hanging in my basement where it was probably pretty humid. In order to start again, should I sand it down to remove all the old coats first? If so, what grip paper should I use?

I can't tell you how frustrating this process has been for me. I've had the damn gun for a while now and finally had the time to clean it up and I'm stuck on the stock. Everything else is ready to go.
Link Posted: 10/29/2006 3:41:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/29/2006 3:44:19 PM EST by DakotaFAL]
I'd sand off any excess or foggy looking finish with 400 grit sandpaper. What's left of the earlier coats will remain in the pores of the wood and should help fill the grain.

If any fuzz is raised by the sanding, remove it with steel wool.

I should add you usually need several coats of tru oil. I usually let it dry over night and then remove the excess with steel wool between coats. 3 to 6 coats is about the minumum depending on how much you want to fill the grain.
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 8:26:11 AM EST
Thank you, I'll give it a go.
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