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Posted: 12/13/2009 8:11:37 AM EDT
Hey all, first time poster on the AK side of this fine establishment.  I am going in a few hours to pick up my new Century built M70AB2.  Pretty excited for the new toy.  When I was there yesterday the friendly counterman field stripped and ran swabs through the barrels on 14 different rifles before I made my decision.  The swabs came out looking horrible, and all barrels had some surface rust.  I imagine due to the salt producing primers used in the military grade bulk ammo.

I have read around here and other mediums that Windex is a great way to neutralize the salt before proceeding with a regular cleaning regimen.  What is the best way to go about attempting to restore the barrel of my new rifle?  

Thanks much,
Ray
Link Posted: 12/13/2009 8:53:13 AM EDT
Century builds the rifles with a new receiver and barrel. What they are pulling out is powder from test firing, no?  Mine was dirty as hell when I got it too, but again, it has a brand new us barrel on it. I also had some light rust on certain parts of it but after a break down and through cleaning it wasnt anything to worry about.
Link Posted: 12/13/2009 8:57:31 AM EDT
A new Century M70AB2 will have an equally new Green Mountain barrel (US made).  Century does not use the original Yugo barrels.  



The bores on a couple of my Century Yugos were initially pretty filthy but cleaned up fine with a normal cleaning routine.
Link Posted: 12/13/2009 5:05:08 PM EDT
I've spent over one hour cleaning the bore with windex, hoppes 9 using 100 bore patches and a brass bore brush.  I've never had to deal with this since I clean my bores after every outting.  

It's better but not much.  It looks like there is rust!  What's the next step?  And ideas please?  

On a side note..
It looks like the front sight post in the center of the sight assembly screws out.  Is this correct?  Also, the rear sight is slightly cocked to the side.  Any ideas on this?
It seems everything is riveted in on these almost making it seem like a disposable firearm.  Tell me this cannot be.

Ray
Link Posted: 12/13/2009 6:05:39 PM EDT
Interesting!  I wonder if century is using the Yugo 7.62 x 39 stuff thats supposedly mildly corrosive to test fire... Another guy said he had a tantel that had some minor rust, were century used corrosive 5.45 to test.

https://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=4&f=95&t=123667
Link Posted: 12/13/2009 6:34:21 PM EDT
Hmm..what should I do if that is the case?  I haven't range tested yet so I ought to do so before getting too bent. How long is the warranty through century?
Link Posted: 12/13/2009 8:01:30 PM EDT
I would shoot it before jumping to any conclusions.  Chances are everything will be fine.  The quality of the Green Mountain barrels is known to be quite good.



Century's warranty is 1 year, but it starts when the dealer/retailer takes delivery of the rifle, not you.
Link Posted: 12/13/2009 9:04:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By RayJNeal:
I've spent over one hour cleaning the bore with windex, hoppes 9 using 100 bore patches and a brass bore brush.  I've never had to deal with this since I clean my bores after every outting.  

It's better but not much.  It looks like there is rust!  What's the next step?  And ideas please?  

On a side note..
It looks like the front sight post in the center of the sight assembly screws out.  Is this correct?  Also, the rear sight is slightly cocked to the side.  Any ideas on this?
It seems everything is riveted in on these almost making it seem like a disposable firearm.  Tell me this cannot be.

Ray


I bet you caused more wear trying to clean the dam barrel than shooting 1k ammo . Just shoot your new toy check for fuction and MOM (min of man) and call it good. When you get home, run a boresnake three times and throw it back in the safe, Its a AK not a precision shooter

Oh and welcome to the forum....
Link Posted: 12/14/2009 3:54:53 AM EDT
The "rust" is what is left over from the bluing process maybe? I don't know if these are blued or parkerized. If blued it is normal to wipe off light rust since that is basically what bluing is.
Link Posted: 12/14/2009 4:06:08 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/14/2009 5:45:40 AM EDT




Originally Posted By DVCBILL:

The "rust" is what is left over from the bluing process maybe? I don't know if these are blued or parkerized. If blued it is normal to wipe off light rust since that is basically what bluing is.


The rifle is parked.

Link Posted: 12/15/2009 7:04:23 PM EDT
Damn I'm lucky.

I keep reading these post on the CIA Yugo AK's and how dirty and lopsided they are.

I bought one from a dealer a few months back and I must have got the pick of the litter. The gun was the best one I've ever seen. It looked like it was finished  with Gunkote  and the barrel was new with deep rifeling and shinny as a crome bumper on a caddie. It shoot a good tight group at 100 and has the smoothest action anyone has ever touched. Everyone that picks it up and pulls the bolt is amazed.

Link Posted: 12/15/2009 7:33:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By StonerAR10:
Damn I'm lucky.

I keep reading these post on the CIA Yugo AK's and how dirty and lopsided they are.

I bought one from a dealer a few months back and I must have got the pick of the litter. The gun was the best one I've ever seen. It looked like it was finished  with Gunkote  and the barrel was new with deep rifeling and shinny as a crome bumper on a caddie. It shoot a good tight group at 100 and has the smoothest action anyone has ever touched. Everyone that picks it up and pulls the bolt is amazed.



Ive purchased two in the past and both of mine were spic and span when I bought them.
Link Posted: 12/18/2009 4:58:19 PM EDT
mine was pretty dirty
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 9:39:15 PM EDT
Originally Posted By RayJNeal:

<snip>

It seems everything is riveted in on these almost making it seem like a disposable firearm.  Tell me this cannot be.

Ray


Yes, they are meant to be cheaply made, easily maintained by peasant draftees - and just as disposable.

As a Soviet designed rifle, they worked within Soviet doctrine of massed infanrty assaults under cover of massed artillery. Which also explains the poor long-range accuracy as they are meant to be fired in mad-minutes of full-auto assaults.

They could've cared less how many Ivans it takes to advance, and how many AKMs get dropped into the muddy battlefields in the process.
Link Posted: 12/21/2009 2:49:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By mac1045:
As a Soviet designed rifle, they worked within Soviet doctrine of massed infanrty assaults under cover of massed artillery. Which also explains the poor long-range accuracy as they are meant to be fired in mad-minutes of full-auto assaults.


The Soviets were unconcerned about accuracy beyond 300 meters not because they used infantry in massed assaults - they didn't, that was the Chinese - but because they knew that: 1. Beyond 300 meters few targets would ever appear that an infantry man could engage with a rifle. 2. The average infantryman isn't able to effectively engage targets beyond 300 meters with a rifle (any rifle) under battlefield conditions. 3.  They had artillery, tanks, machine guns, etc. to engage targets beyond 300 meters.

Much grief and many lives would have been spared  if the US Army would learn these lessons and stop forgetting them.
Link Posted: 12/21/2009 3:01:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By RayJNeal:
It seems everything is riveted in on these almost making it seem like a disposable firearm.  Tell me this cannot be.

I'm not sure what you mean by "... everything...".
The trunnion and stock block are riveted to the receiver. No other parts are riveted.
The rifle will probably be running long after you're dead and doing so with the parts that are in it now.

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