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Page AK-47 » Chinese
Posted: 1/23/2013 6:17:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2013 6:17:30 AM EDT by BellyUpFish]
Well, she lived, but needs some refinishing.

Do I reblue or cerakote?
Link Posted: 1/23/2013 6:30:30 AM EDT
pics?
Link Posted: 1/23/2013 9:26:51 AM EDT
Take some tonight.
Link Posted: 1/24/2013 6:53:12 PM EDT
Without photos, it's hard to answer.

But one thing is for certain - you may want to get the gun checked out due to the heat. Fires do strange things to guns regarding the metal and heat treatment. It may not be safe to shoot anymore.
Link Posted: 1/25/2013 9:48:57 AM EDT
It is generally ill advised to try and shoot live ammo through a weapon which has been subjected to the heat of a house fire.

My vote is refinish it and make it into a wall hanger, desk piece, or a floor lamp.
Link Posted: 1/25/2013 8:35:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/25/2013 8:43:12 PM EDT by BellyUpFish]
The gun was in a safe and suffered minimal damage, all of that damage being finish damage.

No melting of any plastic, etc. I have a bank money bag that you would have no idea it was ever in the safe. Pmags didn't melt, etc. I think the melting point of a P-Mag would be at significantly lower temp than damage to a firearm would occur at.


Link Posted: 1/26/2013 10:24:06 AM EDT
I vote for some oil and a rag, maybe some oil and a bit of steel wool, and leave it alone, it's an awesome conversation finish.
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 10:43:59 AM EDT
Fire finish, I dig it. A lil Kroil and call it done...
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 11:02:50 AM EDT
Looks good to me!
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 7:10:53 PM EDT
Ok, so what about the ammo? LOL

Link Posted: 1/26/2013 7:31:41 PM EDT
That ammo didn't get hot enough to ignite . I'd shoot the shit out of that gun.
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 7:41:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/26/2013 7:46:41 PM EDT by bjonesgtaw]
good rust bluing candidate?
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 7:49:01 PM EDT
I definitely would not shoot that and especially not that ammo. But it's your life and you can roll the dice on that stuff if you want. Just don't shoot it around anyonr else.
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 7:57:48 PM EDT
Polish the metal then chrome it like a bumper.

Shiny AKs are sweet!
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 8:21:12 PM EDT


The rust on the ammo is surface rust. I've been running a lot through the tumbler. Comes right off, just tired of doing it.

This ammo was new in the package and just got a bath from the firemen.

The gun didn't get hot enough to hurt it. The almost 65% plastic guns on either side of it, and their associated red dots still work, which indicates the solder didn't get hot enough to flow, or less than 450*F.

She ran like a top and gobbled up the rusty stuff.
Link Posted: 1/26/2013 8:38:35 PM EDT
That's not that bad. It could be redone any number of ways.
Link Posted: 1/27/2013 11:40:04 AM EDT
what a good excuse to chrome it or 'antique' it as someone mentioned, that would be killer. I'de personally feel ok about shooting it w/ that ammo. but I personally isn't nown fer my branes.
Link Posted: 1/27/2013 5:35:05 PM EDT
The ammo and gun have both been shot. The ammo is gone, myself and the Mak still exist. ;)

It amazes me sometimes what will spook folks. I bet 99.9% of those in this thread will strap themselves into 2,000lb+ missiles and launch out towards other completely unknown other 2,000lb missiles within the next 24 hours. ;)
Link Posted: 1/28/2013 10:14:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By BellyUpFish:
The ammo and gun have both been shot. The ammo is gone, myself and the Mak still exist. ;)

It amazes me sometimes what will spook folks. I bet 99.9% of those in this thread will strap themselves into 2,000lb+ missiles and launch out towards other completely unknown other 2,000lb missiles within the next 24 hours. ;)


There might be some misunderstanding here.

It isn't the practice of this forum to condone shooting firearms and ammunition that sustained damage in a fire - whether surface/aesthetic damage or severe. As with any fire, there's an element of heat involved. Heat does things to metal whether it's noticeable or not. Particulary when it comes to receivers and barrels. For some folks here that have experience in dealing with firearms after they've sustained fire/heat damage, I think most of us will always move to the side of caution without a metallurgy test.

Above all else, I believe almost all the members here prefer safety over "doesn't appear to be that bad" assessments. Regardless of the severity, if everyone said, "Looks okay, go ahead and shoot it," and something were to happen that caused injury to the shooter or others, we wouldn't be doing any of the readers - novice and experienced - any justice. It's definitely the shooter's/owner's discretion as to what they want to do in each case - especially when it involves pointy objects packed in about 125 grains of powder that will be about four inches from one's face and will travel out of a barrel at about 2,300 feet per second.
Link Posted: 1/28/2013 10:19:40 AM EDT
So now that you have shot it, how are you going to refinish it? I still vote for just oiling it down and keeping the look.
Link Posted: 1/28/2013 12:02:22 PM EDT
It cleaned up pretty well with an oily rag. ;) I think I'll leave it.
Link Posted: 1/28/2013 3:53:24 PM EDT
Would like to see the pics. Bet it looks sweet!
Link Posted: 1/29/2013 7:01:05 AM EDT
I'll snap one tonight..
Link Posted: 1/29/2013 5:58:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CaptainKickass:
Would like to see the pics. Bet it looks sweet!


It has character.



Link Posted: 1/30/2013 6:42:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/30/2013 6:43:53 PM EDT by DSH1776]
HAHA..... what house fire??!!??!! by the way, wanted to say im real sorry, I cant imagine losing your home, take care and good luck.
Link Posted: 2/2/2013 7:37:05 AM EDT
We have all seen videos where a guy will keep on shooting an ak til the wood catches on fire and keep on shooting on youtube. Your rifle wasn't aparently burned as bad as those rifles. Why not shoot it, it just has a little surfacial rust which makes it look more like a veteran anyhow.

The ammo I don't know. Might shoot a couple see if they work ok. If not, oh well.
Link Posted: 2/2/2013 2:09:05 PM EDT

It looks better than my MAK 90 looked after a week in katrina flood water.
Some Birchwood Casey Super Blue and new wood furniture and it's good as ever. Tough to hurt these things seriously.

Link Posted: 2/4/2013 8:11:16 PM EDT
Glad everything turned out good.
Link Posted: 2/10/2013 8:52:06 PM EDT
what brand safe do you have and can i see some picks of your safe?

thanks
Link Posted: 2/10/2013 9:20:22 PM EDT
OP glad you are OK , a fire in your home is something i never want to experience ,be well and shoot straight
Link Posted: 2/11/2013 5:01:53 PM EDT
It might have been the fumes from the fire.
I burned a wire In my old Pontiac and it rusted the upper side of my Ruger Mk. 1 in the glove compartment.
No fire, just some smoke and it rusted the Ruger overnight.
The wire wasn't even that close.
Link Posted: 2/13/2013 4:48:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Rayman1:
Originally Posted By BellyUpFish:
The ammo and gun have both been shot. The ammo is gone, myself and the Mak still exist. ;)

It amazes me sometimes what will spook folks. I bet 99.9% of those in this thread will strap themselves into 2,000lb+ missiles and launch out towards other completely unknown other 2,000lb missiles within the next 24 hours. ;)


There might be some misunderstanding here.

It isn't the practice of this forum to condone shooting firearms and ammunition that sustained damage in a fire - whether surface/aesthetic damage or severe. As with any fire, there's an element of heat involved. Heat does things to metal whether it's noticeable or not. Particulary when it comes to receivers and barrels. For some folks here that have experience in dealing with firearms after they've sustained fire/heat damage, I think most of us will always move to the side of caution without a metallurgy test.

Above all else, I believe almost all the members here prefer safety over "doesn't appear to be that bad" assessments. Regardless of the severity, if everyone said, "Looks okay, go ahead and shoot it," and something were to happen that caused injury to the shooter or others, we wouldn't be doing any of the readers - novice and experienced - any justice. It's definitely the shooter's/owner's discretion as to what they want to do in each case - especially when it involves pointy objects packed in about 125 grains of powder that will be about four inches from one's face and will travel out of a barrel at about 2,300 feet per second.


Are you an engineer or metallurgist? people shoot their ak's beyond the temp to spontaneously combust wood (660ish F). which is also well above the temp that anneals carbon steel. Heating it to 450F will do absolutely nothing to the gun. I work with steel, aluminum and titanium on a daily basis. I design a lot of thing for your Navy, do you trust their guns? :P
Link Posted: 2/15/2013 8:51:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Rayman1:
Originally Posted By BellyUpFish:
The ammo and gun have both been shot. The ammo is gone, myself and the Mak still exist. ;)

It amazes me sometimes what will spook folks. I bet 99.9% of those in this thread will strap themselves into 2,000lb+ missiles and launch out towards other completely unknown other 2,000lb missiles within the next 24 hours. ;)


There might be some misunderstanding here.

It isn't the practice of this forum to condone shooting firearms and ammunition that sustained damage in a fire - whether surface/aesthetic damage or severe. As with any fire, there's an element of heat involved. Heat does things to metal whether it's noticeable or not. Particulary when it comes to receivers and barrels. For some folks here that have experience in dealing with firearms after they've sustained fire/heat damage, I think most of us will always move to the side of caution without a metallurgy test.

Above all else, I believe almost all the members here prefer safety over "doesn't appear to be that bad" assessments. Regardless of the severity, if everyone said, "Looks okay, go ahead and shoot it," and something were to happen that caused injury to the shooter or others, we wouldn't be doing any of the readers - novice and experienced - any justice. It's definitely the shooter's/owner's discretion as to what they want to do in each case - especially when it involves pointy objects packed in about 125 grains of powder that will be about four inches from one's face and will travel out of a barrel at about 2,300 feet per second.




The heat wasn't even intense enough to melt the P-mags.
Link Posted: 2/15/2013 11:51:37 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Murooka:
Originally Posted By Rayman1:
Originally Posted By BellyUpFish:
The ammo and gun have both been shot. The ammo is gone, myself and the Mak still exist. ;)

It amazes me sometimes what will spook folks. I bet 99.9% of those in this thread will strap themselves into 2,000lb+ missiles and launch out towards other completely unknown other 2,000lb missiles within the next 24 hours. ;)


There might be some misunderstanding here.

It isn't the practice of this forum to condone shooting firearms and ammunition that sustained damage in a fire - whether surface/aesthetic damage or severe. As with any fire, there's an element of heat involved. Heat does things to metal whether it's noticeable or not. Particulary when it comes to receivers and barrels. For some folks here that have experience in dealing with firearms after they've sustained fire/heat damage, I think most of us will always move to the side of caution without a metallurgy test.

Above all else, I believe almost all the members here prefer safety over "doesn't appear to be that bad" assessments. Regardless of the severity, if everyone said, "Looks okay, go ahead and shoot it," and something were to happen that caused injury to the shooter or others, we wouldn't be doing any of the readers - novice and experienced - any justice. It's definitely the shooter's/owner's discretion as to what they want to do in each case - especially when it involves pointy objects packed in about 125 grains of powder that will be about four inches from one's face and will travel out of a barrel at about 2,300 feet per second.




The heat wasn't even intense enough to melt the P-mags.



I think he missed that nugget of info before he went into "teach this bucko a lesson" mode. ;)
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