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Posted: 3/27/2009 8:39:08 PM EDT
I stole this from another site.


Caliber: 7.62×39 mm M43 (also experimental 5.6×39mm)
Action: Gas operated, vertically sliding bolt
Overall length: 525 mm / 20.7″
Barrel length: 415 mm / 16.3″
Weight: 2.8 - 2.4 kg (depending on version) / 6.2 - 5.3 lbs
Rate of fire: 560 rounds pr minute
Magazine capacity: 30 rounds

The line of TKB-022 experimental assault rifles is one of most intriguing developments in small arms, made in Soviet Union. In many respects these weapons, designed during early sixties by Soviet gun designer G. A. Korobov were many years ahead of its time. Those guns were simply too advanced for conservative-thinking Soviet Army officers who preferred simple, familiar, proven and reliable Kalashnikov assault rifles over anything else. Regardless of this, the TKB-022 is well worth mentioning, if just for the sake of curiosity.
TKB stands for Tulskoe Kosntructorskoe Buro - Tula Design Bureau, an arms-designing organisation associated with Tula arms factory (TOZ), which later evolved into the KBP - large and famous arms design and manufacturing state-owned company. Korobov was one of the more advanced designers at KBP, and he always tried to step ahead of its time. In this case, he tried to create a compact weapon, suitable for motorized troops riding in cramped armored personnel carriers (BMP, BTR) or helicopters. Despite very compact size, this weapon retained full-length barrel (and thus effective range and lethality) of much longer standard assault rifles such as Kalashnikov AKM. In fact, TKB-022 has best barrel length to overall length ratio among most military rifles ever built. During mid- to late sixties Korovov produced several variations of the TKB-022, from TKB-022PM to TKB-022PM5. The last one, the?TKB-022PM5, which was produced in 1968, was chambered for then-experimental 5.6×39 ammunition (which latter evolved into 5.45×39). All weapons were tested by Soviet army, but turned down on unpublished reasons (most probably because the gun was simple too advanced for contemporary military thinking, but also possibly because no-one at the time could tell for sure if plastic housing would hold its integrity in extreme weather conditions or during many years of storage or use).

The TKB-022 assault rifle is gas-operated weapon with annular gas piston located around the barrel. To achieve minimum length, it is assembled into bull-pup configuration and uses vertically sliding breech block (bolt), rather than traditional and most common bolt that cycles back and forth. Since the movement of the bolt (breech block) in this design cannot be used to extract, eject and load cartridges, Korobov developed a special U-shaped rammer / extractor, that strips the frech cartridge from magazine, pushes it into the chamber, then, after the discharge, pulls the fired cartridge case back from the chamber. Upon feeding the next fresh cartridge, the fired case is pushed forward and slightly up, into the ejection chute above the barrel. Spent cases finally fell off the gun above the muzzle. Gun was capable of full- and semi-automatic fire, with combined safety / fire mode selector switch located above the trigger on the left side of the gun.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 9:31:41 PM EDT
Damn, that's some cool stuff....WAY ahead of their time. Sure would like a computer animation of that action....
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 9:42:07 PM EDT
One word - FUGLY

Yeah, I know...a weapon is a tool - however, I like my "tools" to be visually appealing and of course work!

my $0.02

Sakic #19
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 9:45:52 PM EDT
Kinda reminds me of a monkey wrench
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 9:33:01 AM EDT
Looks like a weapon you would have seen in Val Helsing or Hall Boy.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 10:19:55 AM EDT
Needs more bakelite.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 10:24:27 AM EDT
How does it work? There isn't enough room for a bolt to strip a round from the magazine. It must have a complicated feed mechanism.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 10:28:57 AM EDT
i want one.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 4:41:01 PM EDT
I would buy one.Looks a little rear heavy though, it was probably unstable in the shoulder and I imagine with a mechanism like that reliability is out the window.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 5:36:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Skillshot:
How does it work? There isn't enough room for a bolt to strip a round from the magazine. It must have a complicated feed mechanism.


The bolt is thin.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 6:31:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2009 6:40:25 PM EDT by omega53513]
Picture is from another forum. Most of the Russian guns are reliable, I would think that this one is not an exception. I also heard that bakelite was manufactured from a specific type of oil which was extracted from only one well in USSR, soon that supply ended and so did bakelite.

Link Posted: 3/28/2009 7:18:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By LtDirector:
Originally Posted By Skillshot:
How does it work? There isn't enough room for a bolt to strip a round from the magazine. It must have a complicated feed mechanism.


The bolt is thin.


Sure
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 9:57:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Kikilee:
I stole this from another site.

http://i39.tinypic.com/106il9l.jpg
Caliber: 7.62×39 mm M43 (also experimental 5.6×39mm)
Action: Gas operated, vertically sliding bolt
Overall length: 525 mm / 20.7″
Barrel length: 415 mm / 16.3″
Weight: 2.8 - 2.4 kg (depending on version) / 6.2 - 5.3 lbs
Rate of fire: 560 rounds pr minute
Magazine capacity: 30 rounds

The line of TKB-022 experimental assault rifles is one of most intriguing developments in small arms, made in Soviet Union. In many respects these weapons, designed during early sixties by Soviet gun designer G. A. Korobov were many years ahead of its time. Those guns were simply too advanced for conservative-thinking Soviet Army officers who preferred simple, familiar, proven and reliable Kalashnikov assault rifles over anything else. Regardless of this, the TKB-022 is well worth mentioning, if just for the sake of curiosity.
TKB stands for Tulskoe Kosntructorskoe Buro - Tula Design Bureau, an arms-designing organisation associated with Tula arms factory (TOZ), which later evolved into the KBP - large and famous arms design and manufacturing state-owned company. Korobov was one of the more advanced designers at KBP, and he always tried to step ahead of its time. In this case, he tried to create a compact weapon, suitable for motorized troops riding in cramped armored personnel carriers (BMP, BTR) or helicopters. Despite very compact size, this weapon retained full-length barrel (and thus effective range and lethality) of much longer standard assault rifles such as Kalashnikov AKM. In fact, TKB-022 has best barrel length to overall length ratio among most military rifles ever built. During mid- to late sixties Korovov produced several variations of the TKB-022, from TKB-022PM to TKB-022PM5. The last one, the?TKB-022PM5, which was produced in 1968, was chambered for then-experimental 5.6×39 ammunition (which latter evolved into 5.45×39). All weapons were tested by Soviet army, but turned down on unpublished reasons (most probably because the gun was simple too advanced for contemporary military thinking, but also possibly because no-one at the time could tell for sure if plastic housing would hold its integrity in extreme weather conditions or during many years of storage or use).

The TKB-022 assault rifle is gas-operated weapon with annular gas piston located around the barrel. To achieve minimum length, it is assembled into bull-pup configuration and uses vertically sliding breech block (bolt), rather than traditional and most common bolt that cycles back and forth. Since the movement of the bolt (breech block) in this design cannot be used to extract, eject and load cartridges, Korobov developed a special U-shaped rammer / extractor, that strips the frech cartridge from magazine, pushes it into the chamber, then, after the discharge, pulls the fired cartridge case back from the chamber. Upon feeding the next fresh cartridge, the fired case is pushed forward and slightly up, into the ejection chute above the barrel. Spent cases finally fell off the gun above the muzzle. Gun was capable of full- and semi-automatic fire, with combined safety / fire mode selector switch located above the trigger on the left side of the gun.


What the hell is an annular gas piston?
That drawing is a wrong.
It sounds like a interesting concept but yea it is kind of butt ugly. I would like to fire the 5.6 variant.
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 4:53:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By omega53513:
I also heard that bakelite was manufactured from a specific type of oil which was extracted from only one well in USSR, soon that supply ended and so did bakelite.


Bakelite was commonly used before the methods of making many different plastics was known. For instance, I have an old Philco radio with a bakelite case. I'm sure Philco didn't get the bakelite from the SU.

Link Posted: 3/29/2009 5:32:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By POLYTHENEPAM:
Originally Posted By omega53513:
I also heard that bakelite was manufactured from a specific type of oil which was extracted from only one well in USSR, soon that supply ended and so did bakelite.


Bakelite was commonly used before the methods of making many different plastics was known. For instance, I have an old Philco radio with a bakelite case. I'm sure Philco didn't get the bakelite from the SU.



Bakelite (pronounced /ˈbеɪkɨlaɪt/) is a material based on the thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin polyoxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride, developed in 1907–1909 by Belgian Dr. Leo Baekeland. Formed by the reaction under heat and pressure of phenol (a toxic, colourless crystalline solid) and formaldehyde (a simple organic compound), generally with a wood flour filler, it was the first plastic made from synthetic components. It was used for its electrically nonconductive and heat-resistant properties in radio and telephone casings and electrical insulators, and was also used in such diverse products as kitchenware, jewellery, pipe stems, and children's toys. In 1993 Bakelite was designated an ACS National Historical Chemical Landmark in recognition of its significance as the world's first synthetic plastic.

Today, Bakelite is manufactured and produced in the form of sheets, rods and tubes for hundreds of industrial applications in the electronics, power generation and aerospace industries, and under a variety of commercial brand names, including Garolite.

Garolite with canvas might ring a bell - G10 anyone? (many of today's tactical knives use G10 scales...)
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 9:36:29 AM EDT
haha, a bakelite reciever, lol.
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 2:19:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By AzNooB:
Needs more bakelite.


Haha, the gunboy version of "MORE COWBELL!"
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 5:47:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Akalvarez:
What the hell is an annular gas piston?
That drawing is a wrong.
It sounds like a interesting concept but yea it is kind of butt ugly. I would like to fire the 5.6 variant.


I found that strange too, wrong picture for description? I know there were quite a few different experimentals made... such as the one the 3 barrels etc...
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