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Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
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Posted: 6/15/2007 9:58:23 AM EDT
A question for all you 5.45x 39 experts.  I'm looking to pick up a 1080 sealed tin of the 5.45 WASP for storage, but I'm a little confused on something.....  

To my understading the original 5.45 WASP (that's available) is 80's production 53 grain steel core, but on the web I'm also seeing some Bulgarian 90's production 52 grain in the same 1080 sealed ammo can.  Is this a typo?  If not, does it have the same steel core? Any info you might offer would be appreciated...!!!  



Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:11:27 AM EDT
[#1]
It's the same ammo shooting the same bullet.  You'll often find small variances in bullet weight when you're talking about mass produced surplus ammo. Not to mention the conversion from metric to imperial weight.   I pulled a few bullets from a can of '91 Bulgy 5.45 and found a 1.5gr spread in just a small sample.  Remember 1gr is 1/7000 of a pound..not enough to worry about.

Here are my chrono results for the other thread:

Bulgarian AKS74, 16.3" barrel
Ambient Temp: 64F
Pact XP Chronograph 18" from muzzle
30rds fired for average

Russian 7n6 (Dated 1976):
Hi: 3102
Lo: 3041
Avg: 3068
ES: 61
SD: 34.5

Polish 7n6 (Dated 1993)
Hi: 3151
Lo: 3103
Avg: 3138
ES: 48
SD: 21.2

Bulgarian 7n6 (Dated 1991)
Hi: 3168
Lo: 3141
Avg: 3152
ES: 27
SD: 12.3
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:26:16 AM EDT
[#2]
Thanx for the clarification. I had called and asked the CSR to check with their tech guy, who came back and said "NO" it was not the same stuff as the 53g WASP. He said he pulled a bullet and it measured 52g. I have a feeling this 1g variance is why he "assumed" it was not the same stuff.

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/cb/cb.asp?a=309193
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:31:54 AM EDT
[#3]
Well, that ad also states the ammo is non-corrosive...which is false.  (SG is not the only retailer who tells this lie.)  I'm not surprised they are also confused about the bullet weight.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:35:47 AM EDT
[#4]
Lack of Bulgarian interpreters to translate the 1080 tin label.....
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:53:06 AM EDT
[#5]
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 11:59:10 AM EDT
[#6]
Tactical T…your biggest mistake is assuming that anything Sportsmans Guide has on its website might be correct.  I’ve never dealt with a company that is as clueless about the products it sells as Sportsman Guide.

As Drich said, this stuff is not 52 grain.  It’s all 53 grain.  And there is no non-corrosive surplus 5.45 being sold in the American market, despite SG’s claims of their ammo being non-corrosive.  (And DRich is also right…some other companies, like Southern Ohio Gun, also tell this lie.  And I know for a fact that in SOG’s case, they knowingly tell this lie.)

I won’t do business with SG.  I had an ordeal with them once where they didn’t want to honor their own low price guarantee.  They really came out of that ordeal looking like a bunch of scumbags.  The fact that they can’t get simple information correct on their website should have been a good warning not to deal with them.  
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 12:05:35 PM EDT
[#7]
I hear you man. They are clueless as to some of what they sell. I think the owner travels around the world buying up surplus stuff at rockbottom prices in bulk and resells it on the site.  I've actually been buying from them for a few years, and never had a problem, but it's usually stuff where they can't possibly screw up.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 5:22:08 PM EDT
[#8]
So the Bulgarian is corrosive?
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 5:44:13 PM EDT
[#9]
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 9:20:40 PM EDT
[#10]
I don't like the corrosive factor either, but I've hears it should still have about a 30-year shelf life from the date of manufacture, assuming you don't open the tin. Unfortunately, I have no way to be sure of that time frame.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:38:21 AM EDT
[#11]
Shelf life should be closer to 60+ years.

Corrosive primers remain stable for a very, very long time...which is why the Warsaw Pact continued to use them long after non-corrosive primers were developed.  They were big believers in never throwing anything away.  If they didn't use it in combat, it was put in storage in warehouses, bunkers and salt mines, just in case they needed it 50yrs later.  Hell, when the USSR disbanded they still had millions of re-arsenaled 60yr old Mosin Nagants sitting in crates, ready to shoot.        

I'm in my mid-30's and I'm sure this 5.45x39 will be good long after I'm dead as long as it's stored correctly.  I'm still shooting Turkish 8mm that was produced in the 1930's  and various 7.62x54R that was made in the 50's and it all works just fine.  
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 8:10:44 AM EDT
[#12]

Quoted:
Shelf life should be closer to 60+ years.

Corrosive primers remain stable for a very, very long time...which is why the Warsaw Pact continued to use them long after non-corrosive primers were developed.  They were big believers in never throwing anything away.  If they didn't use it in combat, it was put in storage in warehouses, bunkers and salt mines, just in case they needed it 50yrs later.  Hell, when the USSR disbanded they still had millions of re-arsenaled 60yr old Mosin Nagants sitting in crates, ready to shoot.        

I'm in my mid-30's and I'm sure this 5.45x39 will be good long after I'm dead as long as it's stored correctly.  I'm still shooting Turkish 8mm that was produced in the 1930's  and various 7.62x54R that was made in the 50's and it all works just fine.  


Wow, 60+ years is impressive, and much more than I would have ever imagined. Maybe the 30 year shelf life was for non-corrosive  ammo, assuming it was stored properly. Come to think of it, the article I read on the subject was referring to US military surplus ammo, most of which is non-corrosive.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 8:52:11 AM EDT
[#13]
As it ages, you'll notice decreases/inconsistencies in velocity due to slow degradation of the powder, but it will remain reliable and deadly for many decades to come as long as you keep it cool and dry.

Non-corrosive primers are not nearly as stable.  After 40-50yrs, duds and/or hang-fires become much more common with non-corrosive primers.
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