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Posted: 6/14/2021 8:54:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2021 9:12:41 AM EDT by prebans]
I’ll ‘fess up; I got caught with my pants down on a trip to the WY MG and cannon shoot.  My car was riding low because ammo isn’t light.  . I missed a road rut in the dusk twilight, bottomed out, and tore away part of my front bumper cover, the radiator cover, and some guard panels.  

The damage wasn’t disabling, but I didn’t want to create more damage by dragging those panels while returning to the hotel.  Ended up walking a barbed wire fence line along the road and found some scrap barbed wire pieces on the ground.  I untwisted the wire, removed the barbs, and used it like baling wire to secure things.  It held long enough for me to get to town for zip ties from Home Depot.

What would you put into a vehicle emergency kit?  Anything to add for a 12-16’ enclosed cargo trailer?

I’ve already got long wrecker jumper cables, a tire repair kit (which was handy on I-90 in SD due to a long nail on the interstate), and a portable air compressor.  And now zip ties.
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 9:06:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2021 6:31:47 PM EDT by thederrick106]
I always keep zip ties and electrical tape in my trucks emergency box.  

Tire plug kit.

Small 12V compressor.  Might go slow but better than nothing.

Heavy duty jumper cables.

Small first aid kit.

If going on a trip I always throw a roll of duct tape in my pack.  I don't leave a roll in my truck because in my experience it doesn't do well in high temps.  Electrical tape is usually good.

Small tool kit.  I used to carry more tools when I drove an older vehicle but with the newer stuff there isn't much I am going to be able to fix road side.  If I can fix it my small socket set/ tool kit will work.

Always check your full size spare esp in a truck that has a lowering crank.  I still need to lower mine, wash it out, and soak it in oil for this year.

Trailer:  always check the bearings, have a good spare, and a way to change the tire.

ETA/ tow strap & paracord.

ETA again/  hi viz vest and gloves.
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 10:16:22 AM EDT
Bailing wire, the original duct tape.  I carry a small roll of wire (in addition to zip tires and tape) because there’s things you might need to tie up under a vehicle that might get hot enough to melt plastic zip ties and light duct tape on fire.  

Two pairs of vice grips, a small needle nose and larger heavy duty pair.  They’re the closest thing I’ve found to having a third hand.

12 volt air pump and a tire plug kit.

Jump box.  This only works if you can get in the habit of keeping it charged.

Jumper cables.

Real tools to change a tire.

A head lamp.  

A small fuse kit and a few basic tools but not much, I’m not a mechanic.

First aid kit.

Water.

A small gas can, spout and hose.

Some recovery gear but probably not enough to really help.
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 11:53:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2021 1:31:39 PM EDT by Rifleman_556]
Heavy jumper cables
OEM jack, lug wrench, etc.
Semi truck hydraulic jack
6 ton hydraulic jack because the others won't fit under the front axle

3/4 drive ratchet and a few sockets and adapters
3/8 and 1/4 socket set
2 hazard triangles
Pliers, screwdrivers, hammer
Bungee cords, 550, hay rope
About 6 tiedown straps
Extra fluids for the truck
Edit: forgot some wire, zip ties, feed sacks, and a Farm Use tag

Going to put in some shackles, a tow strap, and a hi-lift jack as soon as I have the accessories welded for it. Oh and more crib/chock blocks soon.
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 12:16:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2021 12:19:11 PM EDT by GlutealCleft]
A full Snap-On ratchet set (SAE and metric, 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4" drive) and combination wrenches, a 10HP gas-powered air compressor, two 1/2" and two 3/4" impact wrenches (two is one, one is none), four extra wheels for the trailer and 4 extra wheels for the truck, 6 extra tires for each, a tire mounting machine, 3 gallons of motor oil, 80 gallons of fuel, spare oil pan, gasket, and drain plug, spare transmission fluid, pan, and gasket, 2 quarts power steering fluid, a spare battery, two 12-ton floor jacks, a rebuild kit for the jacks, a 12kW generator, and a Garmin InReach.  And I never tow without other people towing and convoying with me.

Anything else, it's your funeral, bud.


Sorry, I'm just preemptively getting that out of the way before the usual one-upsmanship arrives and gets us there.  
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 1:10:18 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GlutealCleft:
A full Snap-On ratchet set (SAE and metric, 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4" drive) and combination wrenches, a 10HP gas-powered air compressor, two 1/2" and two 3/4" impact wrenches (two is one, one is none), four extra wheels for the trailer and 4 extra wheels for the truck, 6 extra tires for each, a tire mounting machine, 3 gallons of motor oil, 80 gallons of fuel, spare oil pan, gasket, and drain plug, spare transmission fluid, pan, and gasket, 2 quarts power steering fluid, a spare battery, two 12-ton floor jacks, a rebuild kit for the jacks, a 12kW generator, and a Garmin InReach.  And I never tow without other people towing and convoying with me.

Anything else, it's your funeral, bud.


Sorry, I'm just preemptively getting that out of the way before the usual one-upsmanship arrives and gets us there.  
View Quote

No welder and bar stock? Lame
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 2:21:47 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GlutealCleft:
A full Snap-On ratchet set (SAE and metric, 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4" drive) and combination wrenches, a 10HP gas-powered air compressor, two 1/2" and two 3/4" impact wrenches (two is one, one is none), four extra wheels for the trailer and 4 extra wheels for the truck, 6 extra tires for each, a tire mounting machine, 3 gallons of motor oil, 80 gallons of fuel, spare oil pan, gasket, and drain plug, spare transmission fluid, pan, and gasket, 2 quarts power steering fluid, a spare battery, two 12-ton floor jacks, a rebuild kit for the jacks, a 12kW generator, and a Garmin InReach.  And I never tow without other people towing and convoying with me.

Anything else, it's your funeral, bud.


Sorry, I'm just preemptively getting that out of the way before the usual one-upsmanship arrives and gets us there.  
View Quote


You may have overlooked carrying a Medical Technician with medical bag to resolve any boo boos you may get!  Not sure?

Bill
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 2:22:59 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Rifleman_556:

No welder and bar stock? Lame
View Quote


Replacement Long Block because a short block would take too long to transfer the bolt-ons.
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 2:39:44 PM EDT
don't forget a high visibility vest
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 3:03:22 PM EDT
In on purse measuring swinging

Yup OP you must carry all the tools in the Snap-On website and at least a complete replacement drive pack (engine, transmission, transfercase, shafts, axels, etc) bearings for the trailer and tires.


Really

I've learned that there are just a small list of fastener sizes on modern vehicles.  Vehicles less than 3 decades old that is.

It is likely that you will need only 7 or so wrench sizes to do everything on your BOV.

However you will need all the types of those sizes.

I may have 11 different shapes of 10mm.  When I see a new shape of one of my short list sizes I am likely to buy it.  I have gone to funny contortions to get at the bolt that was under a % and behind the &.



To address the specific event in the OP

Operating vehicles in overload or just max load condition requires extra.

Extra time...can't go as fast safely.

Extra caution...More following distance.  

Extra luck...If you have a lackluster history of luck look to build up margins of capacity such as reducing the load on the vehicle to improve performance and slowing down to place less demand for max performance.
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 3:12:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2021 3:15:46 PM EDT by ClangClang]
Lots of good suggestions in this thread I won't bother repeating. I carry most of them. But to add:

- ham radio preprogrammed with the relevant channels for my AO
- 3 road flares (alerting device, emergency fire starter, etc)
- a couple spare tire valve cores
- Tire deflator and Viair 12V inflator
- Noco GB40 1000A battery boost pack
- 2-3L of water and a bunch of Clif bars
- Some spare clothing (season-dependent)
- A hatchet and Sven Saw for clearing trail blowdown
- A set of good goat leather workgloves
- Basic tool kit as detailed in earlier posts
- A padded board for kneeling down to use any of the aforementioned tools
- Fire extinguisher
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 3:13:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/14/2021 3:14:29 PM EDT by RDTCU]
In the back of my FJ:
Jumper cables, separate NOCO booster pack
Assorted tool bag, tape, fuses, zip ties
Folding 4 way tire iron, tire plugs, compressor
Heavy tow strap, E-tool
12" battery chainsaw
Fire extinguisher or two

Attachment Attached File

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 5:19:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bill3rail:


You may have overlooked carrying a Medical Technician with medical bag to resolve any boo boos you may get!  Not sure?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bill3rail:
Originally Posted By GlutealCleft:
A full Snap-On ratchet set (SAE and metric, 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4" drive) and combination wrenches, a 10HP gas-powered air compressor, two 1/2" and two 3/4" impact wrenches (two is one, one is none), four extra wheels for the trailer and 4 extra wheels for the truck, 6 extra tires for each, a tire mounting machine, 3 gallons of motor oil, 80 gallons of fuel, spare oil pan, gasket, and drain plug, spare transmission fluid, pan, and gasket, 2 quarts power steering fluid, a spare battery, two 12-ton floor jacks, a rebuild kit for the jacks, a 12kW generator, and a Garmin InReach.  And I never tow without other people towing and convoying with me.

Anything else, it's your funeral, bud.


Sorry, I'm just preemptively getting that out of the way before the usual one-upsmanship arrives and gets us there.  


You may have overlooked carrying a Medical Technician with medical bag to resolve any boo boos you may get!  Not sure?


Ah dangit, I knew I forgot something.  
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 5:40:37 PM EDT
Deepwell 1/2" drive impact sockets in all 4 common lug nut sizes.
I thought I was all prepped, but the stud for the spare on my buddies trailer was so long I could get my wrench on it, and the wheel was too small to get a crescent wrench on the nut.
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 9:02:30 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Stryfe:
Deepwell 1/2" drive impact sockets in all 4 common lug nut sizes.
I thought I was all prepped, but the stud for the spare on my buddies trailer was so long I could get my wrench on it, and the wheel was too small to get a crescent wrench on the nut.
View Quote


Some stuff you will never realize until it is too late!  

I have the OEM Crap lug wrench along with a four-way lug and a breaker bar with 3/4" deep socket.  

I have the OEM crap jack, which works if needed but if I am on a long trip I will carry a bottle jack or small floor jack.

Bill
Link Posted: 6/14/2021 10:07:54 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bill3rail:


Some stuff you will never realize until it is too late!  

I have the OEM Crap lug wrench along with a four-way lug and a breaker bar with 3/4" deep socket.  

I have the OEM crap jack, which works if needed but if I am on a long trip I will carry a bottle jack or small floor jack.

Bill
View Quote


I also add a bottle jack on any longer road trips especially when traveling with a trailer.
Link Posted: 6/17/2021 3:05:34 PM EDT
Thank you all very much.  This is great information for creating the kit I’ll need.
Link Posted: 6/17/2021 6:30:21 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By lasnyder:
don't forget a high visibility vest
View Quote


I have one of those too!  My previous post/ list is lacking
Link Posted: 6/17/2021 7:58:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2021 8:01:09 PM EDT by pedaler]
Trash bags - So many uses.....more often they end up being for dirty laundry when traveling or for trash from an expected mess.   You can use them to lay on wet ground so you don't get soaked from crawling under a vehicle.  In a pinch they can be used as rain gear or wind breaker.  


ETA - another thing that I carry that I have not seen mentioned is a code reader.   I had a chevy that taught that lesson.
Link Posted: 6/17/2021 8:11:25 PM EDT
For once I have just about everything people mentioned.

Attachment Attached File


Even a serpentine belt (there was a whole thread about these).

Attachment Attached File


Plus rain gear, a mounted fire extinguisher and a rather thorough first aid bag in-cab.

Attachment Attached File




Link Posted: 6/18/2021 1:10:54 AM EDT
Most of the things that I carry in my truck have been covered by others.

Some other items though that haven't been mentioned (I'll go from memory without going out to the vehicle).

A tarp (beats laying in the mud or ants); I carry a 12,000 pound portable winch that I can put into a 2" receiver in either the front or back; extra antifreeze and oil; extra hose clamps (have had a couple over the years strip out while under way and blew coolant all over); fix a flat in a can; fire starting materials (lighters or flint and steel); rain gear; cheap pair of rubber boots; extra sun glasses, hats and leather gloves; I also recommend a heavy duty front bumper (assuming your are driving a truck) with brush guard and built in receiver (for reference I get $105/year knocked off on my auto insurance for having the HD bumper and brush guard); small shovel; spare fixed blade knife; dental floss (hate traveling on long trips and getting something stuck between my teeth); aspirin and tums; reflective breakdown markers or flares; a come along; small notebook and writing instruments; post it notes; sun screen and insect repellent; paper highway maps; wire stripper and crimping tool plus some low voltage connectors; 10W-40; a piece of old carpet in the bottom of the tool box to keep it more quiet and protect things plus the carpet can be thrown under a wheel for traction.

To reinforce what others have said: fuse kit; high lift jack (had to park on the side of the road a year or two ago after a blowout and could not get the regular jack to fit under the truck); small bottle jack; bow or collapsible saw; ax; 550 cord; duct tape; electrical tape; set of basic tools; owners manual; ratchet straps; chain or tow cable; tow strap; bungee cords; 50 feet of regular rope; trash bags; zip ties; jumper cables; other first aid stuff for boo-boo's, etc.; reflective vest.

I need to add some baling wire or equivalent; thanks folks.
Link Posted: 6/18/2021 9:28:20 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By thederrick106:


I have one of those too!  My previous post/ list is lacking
View Quote


My list wasn’t all inclusive either.  Talking about bailing wire is fine but when you get down to the Mainstay rations and pee bottle folks can start looking at you like you’re a little peculiar.
Link Posted: 6/18/2021 6:38:59 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Beowulf:


My list wasn’t all inclusive either.  Talking about bailing wire is fine but when you get down to the Mainstay rations and pee bottle folks can start looking at you like you’re a little peculiar.
View Quote


your not wrong.
Link Posted: 6/18/2021 8:58:43 PM EDT
I just got done building a trailer and I'm taking notes. Lot of good ideas in this thread.
Link Posted: 6/20/2021 9:18:28 PM EDT
Buy a new, one or two gallon gas can and keep it in your vehicle. Never use it for gas except for emergencies. A new can won't smell like gas and it's there if you need it. Also, carry a 6 ft. long, 1/2" hose for siphoning gas. I'm sure you all know how it's done, right? Unfortunately, it won't work for siphoning gas from some newer vehicles.
A dynamic recovery rope can be priceless if you get stuck and need someone to pull you out or vise-versa. I've pulled a large dually truck with it's wheels buried in mud, out of the rut with my 4Runner. The rope has some stretch. You accelerate the vehicle before the rope gets tight. It uses the vehicle momentum to gain enough force to get a larger vehicle out of a rut.
Also, carry a larger ABC type fire extinguisher. You never know when you need one. I needed one to put out a vehicle fire. Glad I had it. It did a great job.
Link Posted: 6/22/2021 10:31:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/26/2021 11:37:21 AM EDT
Some great ideas for kits.

The most under rated item I had in a small tool kit was a set of tamper proof torx bits.
Had a torx screw on the coil in the distributor cap back out so the motor in Tahoe was miss firing.




Link Posted: 6/26/2021 12:54:50 PM EDT
OST

Link Posted: 6/27/2021 10:44:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2021 10:50:20 PM EDT by prebans]
Thank you, all.  Still taking notes and learning.  A trailer and a pickup are in my future.  I don't intend to ever walk fence lines to scrounge barbed wire again.  The other thing I'm studying is trailer security.  Enclosed utility trailer thefts are through the roof locally and in areas I commonly travel.  GD wasn't too much help, but I still got a few ideas.  Also listening to YouTube videos for other recommendations.

Update- my car is repaired.  It hasn't looked this good in some time, but now my ghetto camo is gone.  
Link Posted: 6/28/2021 3:45:42 AM EDT
A jack base.  Many moons ago I was driving up to Fort Leavenworth, KS is the summer for a military school and had a blowout on a freshly black-topped road in 100+degree temps.  The OEM jack kept sinking in the asphalt and I literally couldn't get my truck lifted .  Looking back, I could have possibly used a floor mat, but I wandered the highway ditch for a 100 yards or so and found a two foot section of a 1x6 which saved the day.  I still remember that struggle over 20 years ago still and about burning myself on scorching asphalt to get a simple tire swapped out...

Lots of good feedback and recommendations here!

ROCK6
Link Posted: 7/3/2021 9:07:18 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/4/2021 1:26:14 PM EDT
Attachment Attached File
Hand tools, VIAIR inflator, NOCO jump pack, Impact, Kinetic Recovery Rope, hitch shackle receiver, Traction Boards.
Link Posted: 7/5/2021 11:05:46 AM EDT
bungee cords and ratchet straps are by far what i use most.

fire extinguisher
normal EDC / get home bag, i take this with me driving anywhere i can't quickly walk to wherever i'm staying
spare mini radio
extra batteries 18650, 123 cells, lithium AAs
Extra 4 2 liters of water and some of the nasty boat survival food bars. i know i wont eat those unless i need to and they last a long time in the heat or cold
minimal tool kit with some sockets, a screw driver and bit kit, multi tool, wire, fuses, hose claps, fix a flat, duct tape, electrical tap
blanket

in the winter i add a change of clothes, extra coat, winter windshield fluid, some extra blankets, and some chemical hand warmers.
Link Posted: 7/5/2021 12:12:56 PM EDT
When you're towing a trailer, throw an extra trailer hub in your kit. Or mount one to your trailer and put the spare on it. Make enough long trips and eventually you'll have a hub go out.
Link Posted: 7/9/2021 9:40:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/9/2021 9:45:24 PM EDT by bustedtrigger137]
Originally Posted By tstone:
When you're towing a trailer, throw an extra trailer hub in your kit. Or mount one to your trailer and put the spare on it. Make enough long trips and eventually you'll have a hub go out.
View Quote


This is great advice.  I always recommend checking the hubs and tire pressure before going out.  Having a spare on hand and the tools to replace (some of which I list below) can safe a lot of headaches.

I spend a lot of weekends pulling trailers for recreation (track days, ATV rides, etc.).  There are a few things that I have found to be invaluable:

Cordless Impact  - Makes changing tires a breeze.  I have standardized on 3/8" tools for my "road box", but take the big 1/2" gun more often than not.  If you're not locked into a battery ecosystem, the Kobalt stuff is great performance per dollar and has an excellent warranty.  Don't forget a set of lug nut sockets and the key if you have locking lugs.  I'd recommend getting a tire inflator and maybe a flashlight from the same brand.  That way, you have most of your bases covered for a tire change.

Jack - The cheap aluminium "racing" jack from Harbor Freight is easy to throw around and enough to change a tire on most cars, trucks, and/or trailers in a pinch.

Wood Blocks - A few chunks of 4"x4" wood are invaluable.  They can be used in conjunction with the jack to lift trucks and to chock wheels if needed.  These double as trailer wheel chocks if disconnected.

Plywood - A piece of 2'x2' plywood makes a great jack base, especially on a soft surface like mud or even a highway shoulder.  These take up effectively zero room.

Tarp - Having something to kneel on is invaluable.  No need to be fancy, wait for Harbor Freight to put tarps on sale for $2.00 or whatever and buy a dozen of them.  I treat these things as disposable

OBD2 Dongle - Good for troubleshooting if you have a CEL pop up and don't want to hunt for a parts store.  Won't give you much aside from piece of mind, however.

Gloves- I always keep at least a pair of hi-viz Mechanix gloves under the seat, if not some nitrile ones as well.  In winter, I swap out for an insulated set and matching hat.

Hi-viz Vest - Changing a tire on the side of the road sucks.  It's worse when people can't see you.  I always keep one of these under the seat.

Most everything else has been covered.  The only other thing I'd mention is that I personally prefer safety wire to zip ties.  Yeah the latter are easier to use, but if you have to secure something unconventional, it's easier to secure something with safety wire.
Link Posted: 7/14/2021 7:51:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/14/2021 7:53:16 PM EDT by prebans]
Thank you again!  I'm actively using and weighing these recommendations to create my own "ultimate" emergency kit.  
Link Posted: 7/15/2021 5:53:14 PM EDT
My Milwaukee M18 cordless impact is worth it's weight in gold. You look like a hero when the boat trailer blows a tire, and you're back up and moving in minutes.

Something that I don't think was mentioned yet: Get the AAA trailer endorsement. It was $66/year to add it to my membership. I had a boat trailer spindle fail on me over the 4th of July weekend. I ended up just off the turnpike in the dark, with rain coming down, hours from home, and work the next day. Every tow company was slammed. And because of the size and height of the boat, the tow guys were talking about needing a lowboy 18 wheeler to get it home for me. I was quoted $2000 to get it to a trailer shop, $3600 to get it home. That $66 endorsement would have covered the whole tow.
Link Posted: 7/16/2021 7:55:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/16/2021 8:00:43 AM EDT by drobs]
I'm off road just about every weekend taking part in and leading trail rides. I carry a lot of recovery gear for myself and to help others.

My 4Runner:
Attachment Attached File


Recovery Gear:
Attachment Attached File


Tire Plug Kit.
Viair 300P air compressor.
Kinetic Recovery Rope.
Soft and hard shackles (3 of each)
Safe Jack Jack Extensions
Tree Strap
Snatch Block
Rhino Recovery Strap
Rhino Tree Saver Strap
Jumper Cables
Winch Controller
Winch Blanket
Surplus Folding E-Tool Shovel
Goretex Coat and Poncho
Couple MRE's and a Mayday Life Boat Rations.
Section of 2x4 for a jack base, water filter, water bottles, mountain house, & Mora knife w/ fire starter kit (not seen)


All the above fits in this duffel. I have 2 pistol cable locks securing the ends of the duffel to cargo hold tie down points.
Attachment Attached File


A few weeks ago I used my tire plug kit to plug a sidewall cut and puncture on a gal's tire during our trail ride. She had her own air compressor but no plug kit.

Attachment Attached File



Link Posted: 7/16/2021 8:04:19 AM EDT
Cell phone and a bottle of Scotch.
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