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Posted: 7/8/2019 11:46:28 AM EDT
*Insert humblebrag thread*

At least 10 years ago I took a single Brazilian jiu jitsu class with a couple of fellow Arfcommer's. That planted a small seed for the future. Somehow I ended up being the first student that signed up at a brand new jiu jitsu academy in my hometown over 4 years ago. But my kids were all in diapers back then and after a couple of months I stopped training due to conflicts with family time.

Early last year with my kids now all out of diapers, my wife and I enrolled them in the kids jiu jitsu class at our local academy. And I started training again a few days later.

I calculated that I've spent almost 200 hours training over the last year and a half or so in jiu jitsu. And this past weekend, I tested for and earned my Blue Belt.

It feels like a tremendous step along the path.
Link Posted: 7/8/2019 12:11:39 PM EDT
Congrats
Link Posted: 7/8/2019 1:19:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/8/2019 1:28:50 PM EDT
Best Dad.
Congrats
Link Posted: 7/8/2019 1:48:04 PM EDT
Congrats.
Having kids is a great motivator to be the protector of the house.
It's what got me going down this road.
Link Posted: 7/8/2019 2:04:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/8/2019 2:05:20 PM EDT by toyotaman]
@Lowdown3 That brown belt looks like it will be turning black soon!

Nice job.
Link Posted: 7/8/2019 3:55:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/8/2019 7:01:49 PM EDT
Terminal white belt checking in to say congrats!
Link Posted: 7/8/2019 8:21:15 PM EDT
After attainment of your Jitz black belt, your next training stage is 'gun-fu' Jitz.

It's enough to make John Wick smile.

Seriously, congrats.
Link Posted: 7/8/2019 9:17:16 PM EDT
Congrats!
I’ve been doing jits for almost 20 years. Got my black belt almost 3 years ago. Still feel like I have a long way to go. My biggest motivation is to keep up with my kids so it’s as good for you as it is for them that you have them in it.
Link Posted: 7/9/2019 7:29:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/9/2019 9:35:53 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By tatsngats:
Congrats!
I’ve been doing jits for almost 20 years. Got my black belt almost 3 years ago. Still feel like I have a long way to go. My biggest motivation is to keep up with my kids so it’s as good for you as it is for them that you have them in it.
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I started helping to coach the kids class, 'Coach Toyotaman', early on. I figure the more I stay active in their sport with them the longer they're likely to continue with it and get something out of it.
Link Posted: 7/13/2019 12:29:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/15/2019 12:07:30 PM EDT
Congrats!!!

jiu jitsu is awesome fitness and unarmed self defense. It takes time, effort, and commitment to do well at it.
Link Posted: 7/17/2019 5:23:28 PM EDT
Got a question for you roll around guys ;). I've got positional vertigo...it's an inner ear thing where if I get into a certain position, my head starts spinning like I'm drunk. It can get so bad that I can't walk and can cause nausea bad enough to cause vomiting. Luckily, I know exactly where NOT to put my head, but I don't think there's a way to "not go there" when wrestling, doing JJ, etc.

Have you experienced guys ever trained with someone who has vertigo brought on by head position? If so, was it an issue or known to be an issue that you avoided during training?
Link Posted: 7/17/2019 6:08:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/17/2019 6:22:00 PM EDT by Lowdown3]
Link Posted: 7/19/2019 4:44:48 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Lowdown3:

I'll ask around.

I can tell you that before I had sinus surgery I regularly went to class and rolled with sinus infections (4-8 of them a year) and that didn't affect me that much .

Honestly, once people learn to calm down their rolling you can do a LOT with a current injury and still roll. Early on, new people tend to be spastic as hell and that's not an option. I've came into class on crutches, did most of the warmup, worked the technique and just rolled playing defensive most of the time working around the injured leg.

Your training partners have a lot to do with this also. I tend to avoid the 20 something new spastic guy when I'm injured cause they can't calm TF down enough. The sad reality is white belts cause the most injuries and it's rarely intentional, it's usually just from them being spastic.

All that being said, grappling in it's nature is very aggression oriented, which tends to bring a lot of tension in the body. A lot of tension in the body means injuries happen easier. Pride is a major factor in all this also, people by their very nature don't want to "lose." But "losing" plays a large part in how you learn combatives. Better to "learn" by losing NOW when all that's bruised is your ego, than on the street where it really matters.

So if you choose your training partners wisely- seek an older calm upper belt to start with and then don't piss them off by trying to get some advantage if they are rolling slow working with you (read: don't mistake kindness for weakness). Always show respect to your training partner, ask about injuries if your not familiar with them, and take time to help them also. This will help YOU become a better fighter and help you learn to put pride and ego aside.
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Lowdown knows the lowdown, for sure and for certain.
Link Posted: 7/19/2019 5:01:25 PM EDT
Jiu Jitsu looks like monkey wrestling for chicks and dudes who like to dry hump other dudes, train in Krav Maga instead
Link Posted: 7/20/2019 12:43:40 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By deathcloak333:
Jiu Jitsu looks like monkey wrestling for chicks and dudes who like to dry hump other dudes, train in Krav Maga instead
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And so it starts.

I did Aikido starting as a youngster. It really doesn't matter which martial arts you study.
Link Posted: 7/20/2019 1:24:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/22/2019 8:50:48 PM EDT by Nick_Adams]
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Originally Posted By jeepnik:
And so it starts.

I did Aikido starting as a youngster. It really doesn't matter which martial arts you study.
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Originally Posted By jeepnik:
Originally Posted By deathcloak333:
Jiu Jitsu looks like monkey wrestling for chicks and dudes who like to dry hump other dudes, train in Krav Maga instead
And so it starts.

I did Aikido starting as a youngster. It really doesn't matter which martial arts you study.
I think it kinda does matter if you're interested in training to acquire a well-rounded skill-set comprised of what you might call 'street practical' defensive techniques.

I took Aikido to brown-belt level back in the early '90s, right about when the 'Steven Seagal Explosion' of interest occurred in the art - mainly as a consequence of his first three movies.

Anyway, even though our Head Instructor's school of aikido was considered a 'hard style,' with its various joint-locks and throws, I always thought it lacked other 'street-practical' components, like the teaching of hand-strikes, blocks, parries, and low kicks. (This was before all the MMA-type training dojos became popular as a result of 'The Octagon' shows).

Had I been able to find a competent Wing Chun school in my area, I would have joined just to learn their system of strikes, traps, parries, and low kicks as a way of supplementing what I felt my aikido training lacked.

But none were available back then nor anything like Brazilian jiujitsu, at least in my area, or I would've transitioned from aikido to a Jitz school right away. There weren't even any judo schools around, an art which at least offers some practical grappling moves in addition to all the throws and roll work.

Tae Kwon Do, of which there were a few dojos around my area, never appealed to me either. Most were spendy 'belt factories' which also expected their students to participate in the monthly TKD kata competitions on the school's behalf, ...

... not to mention I was ever only a luke-warm fan of Chucky Norris.
Link Posted: 7/22/2019 1:49:44 PM EDT
Fellow blue belt here under gracie barra with jefferson Moura. Congrats op hope you continue your journey to purple and beyond.
Link Posted: 7/22/2019 4:22:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/23/2019 6:16:36 PM EDT
While I'm only Luke warm to Brazilian jujitsu I would start in a school if it appealed to me. I think it's a little more sport centric but still applicable.

I grew up in Tang Soo Do, got my first black belt at twelve, wrestled in Illinois school system, trained in jkd, aikido, judo, and jujitsu at the militich camp in Davenport before enlisting and then getting my green belt instructor in mcmaap. I was stationed in Okinawa for a year and got some great local instruction in karate and took multiple week long leave trips to Thailand to train in Muay Thai camps.

Now I bounce for fun and work in a psych hospital.

Anyway... That was just to express that any start is good. I can't wait to start my one year old. When he's a bit older I'll enroll him in a local school if he wants. The most important thing to learn in any training is how to react to being punched.
Link Posted: 7/23/2019 9:21:42 PM EDT
Learned "Judo" over 50 years ago, and haven't had a chance to use it yet. I'm too old and crippled now to do hand combat, so I'll just have to rely on my defensive firearm training. Not saying it hasn't been useful as a confidence booster, but multiple defense strategies are critical for me at this stage, which includes escape and evading, situation avoidance, threat evaluation, negotiation, de-escalation and a last resort is self defense with a firearm. Hopefully, past training and skills in those areas will make up for the loss of the "Judo" and hand combat abilities.

Bottom line, make sure your training is well rounded so you have options. If all you have is a hammer, you tend to treat every problem as a nail. Take advantage of every training opportunity.
Link Posted: 7/24/2019 5:47:53 AM EDT
BJJ is useful and knowing some has gotten me out of some scrapes. I prefer Aikido though and have used it much more often. The throw and joint locks can be devastating or toned down to control out of control, but not overly dangerous people (the drunk uncle at the party scenario).

Overall I would say knowing what a fight is. The confusion, fear, adrenaline, what it is like to get hit in the face, and how (and more importantly when) to hit someone else are a lot more important then what style of martial art you practice.

If you don't have that already then BJJ is a very good start since you will train often against resistance.
Link Posted: 7/24/2019 10:15:55 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/26/2019 11:50:12 PM EDT
The “sport” version and “street” version of any martial art is vastly different. I competed in Judo for years and wouldn’t use 75% of that stuff in a self defense scenario. With Jits I’d use a very different skill set in a self defense situation than I would in a competition. All that being said, I still believe any grappling martial art with jits being one of the best is the best basis for self defense. They are really the only arts you can spar 100% and learn to fight out of bad situations regularly.
Honestly I feel a blue belt in jiujitsu is worth a black belt in most other martial arts any day.
Link Posted: 7/26/2019 11:58:53 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Lowdown3:
I assume most styles will vary from school to school. I know BJJ does.

We have had guys come in from other schools that have had zero, I mean zero self defense part of the puzzle. Fancy delahiva (SP) guard stuff, crazy leg locks, etc. but zero self defense, basics of the clinch, punch defense on the ground etc. zero.

And while you should do some "competitions" for the experience of it, a place that focuses solely on that could be (read: could be) lacking in the self defense aspect of the game.

Leg lock me on the street I'm stabbing the f$%@ out of you while your hands are occupied. I can walk with a torn cruciate ligament, you ain't going far with 10 stab wounds in your abd...

And it's sometimes hard to get "true believers" to realize that. Same with multiples. I used to teach an additional optional night of training focusing just on self defense and the "missing pieces"- working against multiples, against gun and knife, etc. Had a student that is pretty bad ass on the mats, trained everywhere any time the doors were open, drove hours to places to get other takes on stuff, competed and did well, etc. At first seemed interested in the newer concepts- you have to integrate some new things if your going to work against multiple people. Then we did an exercise with one student on the ground and two attackers coming in on them. Blue screen, complete vapor lock.... student sat there the rest of class and never came back to that edition of class.

So changing the realities of the work often blows the mind of some students.

The fight will be what the fight will be... and for true "self defense" you have to look at the possibility of multiple attackers, guns and knives, etc.
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Couldn't have said this any better. I have trained in some form of martial arts the majority of my life, fought in several different matches(boxing, muay thai, wrestling,mma, grappling and bjj) and work as a bouncer several years in Chicago and suburbs. I have broken bones and had my bones broke in some cases, multiple attackers brings a whole new level to any hand to hand situation.
Link Posted: 7/27/2019 8:21:48 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 1:50:34 AM EDT
What jurisdiction are you in where stabbing someone who has you in a leg lock is lawful?

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Originally Posted By Lowdown3:
I assume most styles will vary from school to school. I know BJJ does.

We have had guys come in from other schools that have had zero, I mean zero self defense part of the puzzle. Fancy delahiva (SP) guard stuff, crazy leg locks, etc. but zero self defense, basics of the clinch, punch defense on the ground etc. zero.

And while you should do some "competitions" for the experience of it, a place that focuses solely on that could be (read: could be) lacking in the self defense aspect of the game.

Leg lock me on the street I'm stabbing the f$%@ out of you while your hands are occupied. I can walk with a torn cruciate ligament, you ain't going far with 10 stab wounds in your abd...

And it's sometimes hard to get "true believers" to realize that. Same with multiples. I used to teach an additional optional night of training focusing just on self defense and the "missing pieces"- working against multiples, against gun and knife, etc. Had a student that is pretty bad ass on the mats, trained everywhere any time the doors were open, drove hours to places to get other takes on stuff, competed and did well, etc. At first seemed interested in the newer concepts- you have to integrate some new things if your going to work against multiple people. Then we did an exercise with one student on the ground and two attackers coming in on them. Blue screen, complete vapor lock.... student sat there the rest of class and never came back to that edition of class.

So changing the realities of the work often blows the mind of some students.

The fight will be what the fight will be... and for true "self defense" you have to look at the possibility of multiple attackers, guns and knives, etc.
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Link Posted: 7/28/2019 5:53:55 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Lowdown3:

Have heard that exact sentiment used numerous times before. I know a mid level purple that had black belts in numerous "hi-ya!" types of arts, etc. and his words were essentially "I wasted my time with those."

I disagree with almost any training being "time wasted" as their is always something that can cross over as well as just getting the HABIT of continuous training going which alone is worth it.

The alternative is the "I just need 15 minutes" guy I mentioned in the other thread To surmise that, some weird guy came by the gym, caught me outside, yelled across the parking lot "You teach hand to hand combat?" Oh boy.... this one's gonna be a doo'zey can just feel it... Anyways, invite him to class multiple times in trying to get rid of him. He tells me repeatedly "all I need is 15 minutes."

Evidently some people don't need to train regularly for years, decades, etc. they evidently just need 15 minutes. I guess just like the internet has "one simple trick" for everything, he must have found the "15 minutes to badass" trick online or something! :)
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I’m not saying anything is useless, in fact I just got done training my lasso guard for an hour. I’m pretty sure my lasso guard wouldn’t be my go to technique strategy in most self defense situations but some of the concepts are definitely valid to be sure. What I’m saying is you have to be conscientious of the difference between scoring points and defending your life.
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 7:38:32 AM EDT
You chose well. I wouldn’t focus on belts though. You either can or can’t defend yourself in the real world. The color belt you wear has little to do with that. I wish they would just do away with that system altogether.
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 8:42:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 8:43:10 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 8:45:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 9:40:56 AM EDT
You see the difference between a RNC and a leg lock in terms of responding with deadly force, right?

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Originally Posted By Lowdown3:
I think you missed the point- if you in a self defense situation ON THE STREET started to leg lock someone, the most obvious response from them would be to draw a knife (in case you aren't watching everyone carries knives now a day. OK maybe if you live in some shithole with crazy laws (NYC, etc.) but other than that, you see knives EVERYWHERE if your paying a modicum of attention. What is the bad guy going to do on the street when you heel hook him? He's going to frickin stab you if he can. He isn't going to give a crap about if something is lawful.

Far fetched? Really?

How many knife based training applications show a knife draw to reverse grip and stab to the legs as their response to a RNC?
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Originally Posted By Lowdown3:
Originally Posted By Overtorque:
What jurisdiction are you in where stabbing someone who has you in a leg lock is lawful?

I think you missed the point- if you in a self defense situation ON THE STREET started to leg lock someone, the most obvious response from them would be to draw a knife (in case you aren't watching everyone carries knives now a day. OK maybe if you live in some shithole with crazy laws (NYC, etc.) but other than that, you see knives EVERYWHERE if your paying a modicum of attention. What is the bad guy going to do on the street when you heel hook him? He's going to frickin stab you if he can. He isn't going to give a crap about if something is lawful.

Far fetched? Really?

How many knife based training applications show a knife draw to reverse grip and stab to the legs as their response to a RNC?
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 9:41:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/28/2019 9:42:21 AM EDT by Overtorque]
Double tap.
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 10:24:54 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 10:48:12 AM EDT
Fwiw, any joint lock or choke is deadly force.

A choke can cause death. It can cause a brain bleed, a cardiac event etc. Just like bean bags are not "less than lethal." They are "less lethal."

The definition of deadly force as I had to memorize it 16 years ago is "Deadly force is that force used to cause death or serious bodily harm. Or which a reasonable and prudent person considers likely to cause a substantial risk of death or serious bodily harm."
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 12:07:43 PM EDT
Been doing BJJ at a Gracie Barra for about 5 months. Have to admit I was disappointed that about 75% of the focus is on sport JJ. They do a self defense technique at the beginning of each class, but never delve into it much, and never multiples or weapon defense.

That being said my attitude has adjusted over the last couple of months. The school is convenient and has a great group of people who aren't hurting their training partners. More important than anything is I'm in better physical shape than I was when I started. I'm not sure if I'll ever be in a real self defense situation again (haven't since I got mugged in college 20 years ago), but I see a lot of old people who suffer greatly in ways that could have been avoided with exercise. I get no enjoyment from a traditional gym, but BJJ class is fun - so I actually make a habit of it.
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 1:05:26 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By makintrax73:

Been doing BJJ at a Gracie Barra for about 5 months. Have to admit I was disappointed that about 75% of the focus is on sport JJ. They do a self defense technique at the beginning of each class, but never delve into it much, and never multiples or weapon defense.

That being said my attitude has adjusted over the last couple of months. The school is convenient and has a great group of people who aren't hurting their training partners. More important than anything is I'm in better physical shape than I was when I started. I'm not sure if I'll ever be in a real self defense situation again (haven't since I got mugged in college 20 years ago), but I see a lot of old people who suffer greatly in ways that could have been avoided with exercise. I get no enjoyment from a traditional gym, but BJJ class is fun - so I actually make a habit of it.
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Gracie United here. My gym has a couple of professional fighters ( owner is on UFC contract) and quite a few amateurs.
We do a grappling class and follow it with an “ mma” class.

I’ve trained at a more sport oriented gym and it definitely has some advantages. Definitely a different feel.
When all is said and done, I like to fight and really couldn’t care less about points.
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 2:05:09 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 2:19:59 PM EDT
Congrats on the blue belt! It's a huge accomplishment! I have been training Gracie Jiu Jitsu for many, many years. Keep it up!
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 2:46:34 PM EDT
Adding a useful skill set is always wise & helpful.

Just remember Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Link Posted: 7/28/2019 2:50:51 PM EDT
I did Japanese jujutsu for a long time. Belts are white, green, brown, and black with three grades in each of the white, green, brown and black (10 Kyu). I felt like the biggest learning curve and where I learned the most "magical" cool stuff was in green belt.
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 2:52:30 PM EDT
Funny how its referenced as Brazilian.
Being Japanese
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 3:16:51 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/28/2019 4:49:57 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By 6GUNZ:
You either can or can’t defend yourself in the real world. The color belt you wear has little to do with that. I wish they would just do away with that system altogether.
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Absolutely this, ... but you have to remember that a lot of parents enroll their kids in some form of 'martial art school' if for no other reasons than to burn-off steam three days per week, and in the process maybe gain a bit of fitness and some amount of discipline (getting yelled at occasionally by an adult who isn't their mom or dad).

Thus, for kids, the 'belt system' is simultaneously (a) a visual way of marking progress, (b) re-enforces a 'stick-to-it' psychology (in order to get to the next belt-color toward black belt), and (c) is a ceremonial reward for physical achievement within that MA's system.
Link Posted: 7/30/2019 2:55:29 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By jeepnik:
And so it starts.

I did Aikido starting as a youngster. It really doesn't matter which martial arts you study.
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Originally Posted By jeepnik:
Originally Posted By deathcloak333:
Jiu Jitsu looks like monkey wrestling for chicks and dudes who like to dry hump other dudes, train in Krav Maga instead
And so it starts.

I did Aikido starting as a youngster. It really doesn't matter which martial arts you study.
Spoken like someone who spent time in Aikido. The Japanese martial arts all have their roots in essentially the same source in many respects. There is a ton of cross over into the other ways. So you are very correct in saying it doesn't matter all that much where you begin. All of the forms have something to offer. I'm Fudoshin Ryu for the most part but that doesn't mean we don't go down all sorts of rabbit holes from time to time. On of the best Judokas I ever studied with was deeply rooted in Aikido thinking.

I always get a kick out of the young guys who come around and start telling us all about how BJJ is the only way to go and how it dominates MMA. Then they get their asses handed to them by a seventy something 8th Dan who needs a cane to stand up. If he played by their rules then he wouldn't stand a chance. They always ask what he's using and his response is always "Whatever I need."

Don't get hung up on belt colors. Lots of times I'll wear my white belt when I'm in a class outside where I earned my rank. And for the record the first class on unarmed knife defense should be on how to self-apply a tourniquet.
Link Posted: 7/31/2019 9:04:17 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By mrrick:
Funny how its referenced as Brazilian.
Being Japanese
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BJJ has a distinctly different focus and style than JJJ. Enough so that there is a terminology distinction.

For anyone wishing to focus on self defense, including weapon involvement, I would advise seeking out a quality Japanese ju jitsu dojo. One taught by "gun guys" who have a solid grounding in real world combatives. A plus if they cross train at some quality firearms training facilities and/or are in LE.

BJJ has become very focused on sport. Even though several schools have self defense programs.

JJJ, originally, had the main goal of keeping your opponent from employing a weapon while you employed yours. Barring that, forcing your opponent to hit the ground as hard as possible while you remain standing. Barring that, being able to inflict enough damage on your opponent, as quickly as possible so as to allow you to regain your feet and finish him.

I won't go in to the whole devolvement of ju jitsu in the late 1800s and how Kano brought about judo from the ashes of the unrealistic practicing of ju jitsu at that time. It's an interesting study if you're so inclined.

But it does speak to why BJJ is effective, same as several other "sports" (wrestling, boxing, judo, MT) that are useful in real world self defense. i.e. They can be practiced full force, full speed, against a resisting opponent.
Link Posted: 8/2/2019 6:29:16 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Ridgerunner9876:

BJJ has a distinctly different focus and style than JJJ. Enough so that there is a terminology distinction.

For anyone wishing to focus on self defense, including weapon involvement, I would advise seeking out a quality Japanese ju jitsu dojo. One taught by "gun guys" who have a solid grounding in real world combatives. A plus if they cross train at some quality firearms training facilities and/or are in LE.

BJJ has become very focused on sport. Even though several schools have self defense programs.

JJJ, originally, had the main goal of keeping your opponent from employing a weapon while you employed yours. Barring that, forcing your opponent to hit the ground as hard as possible while you remain standing. Barring that, being able to inflict enough damage on your opponent, as quickly as possible so as to allow you to regain your feet and finish him.

I won't go in to the whole devolvement of ju jitsu in the late 1800s and how Kano brought about judo from the ashes of the unrealistic practicing of ju jitsu at that time. It's an interesting study if you're so inclined.

But it does speak to why BJJ is effective, same as several other "sports" (wrestling, boxing, judo, MT) that are useful in real world self defense. i.e. They can be practiced full force, full speed, against a resisting opponent.
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The issue I've found with wanting to do JJJ is the closest dojo that I've heard about is in Rhode Island, while there are BJJ gyms all over the place. Not that it matters for me at the moment, I'm usually at work when there are classes.
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