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Link Posted: 4/21/2008 5:51:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BaxterStockman:
I am amazed at how much easier that is than I had imagined it.
Don't know exactly what I was imagining, but it was difficult and expensive.  This, clearly, is not.

Thanks a ton. This is what I come to the SF for.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vW7_cTn6YpE


part of the reason these guys made this movie. just like this post. to get folks to realise it aint rocket science....

get your stuff bagged and packed....but get it. ya cant buy it after an event.
Link Posted: 4/21/2008 10:43:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/21/2008 10:52:42 AM EDT by freemanesq]

Originally Posted By Tarsus:
Does anybody know if FreemanESQ is still active?  I was hoping he'd jump in and say hello after I bumped it and the search doesn't return any recent posts.


I'm still here.  Thanks for the bump and all the positive feedback.  I've been tied up with work lately and haven't posted much.

After the session shown in the pictures, I'll only use the small mylar bags from now on.  As we all say, you need to rotate your stock and the small bags have been a real help.  For instance, we've started cooking a lot more and I've opened one of the buckets and used two of the sugar packs.  A few weeks ago, I started using some of the tea bags we'd stored.  We were smoking ribs yesterday and noticed we were out of brown sugar.  Open a bucket and pull three pounds out.  As you would expect, everything was just like new.  

I'm planning on making some more of the multi item buckets for family members.  For my parents, I'm going to put a couple of buckets in their spare closet and tell him to open up if they need food.  (They've got a camper and can cook, etc. off grid).

For those discussing how easy and inexpensive this is - I agree.  You may have seen little feet in the pictures - this is a great thing to do with your kids.  My children now think that storing extra food is just something families do.  They will take this knowledge to their families some day when they get married.  

FYI - I now store these buckets in my garage stacked 4 high.  I put the heavier buckets on bottom and this has worked very well.  Don't forget to pick up a bucket lid removal tool.

Let me know if you guys have any questions.

R.

Edit - spelling
Link Posted: 4/21/2008 11:12:27 AM EDT
thanks freemanesq, great post
Link Posted: 4/21/2008 11:24:35 AM EDT
height=8
Originally Posted By freemanesq:

Mylar bags – Whether you have new or used buckets, food grade or not food grade buckets, it’s a wise idea to store your food in something that will be a barrier between the food and the bucket.  You can purchase Mylar bags in various dimensions and thicknesses.  I have purchased large (30” x 20”) 5 mil bags from Sorbient Systems online.   Most recently, I purchased smaller bags (14” x 14”) 7 mil bags from the LDS Church online.  I am not an LDS member, but they don’t care.  The price was good in my opinion (250 bags for $90) with shipping about $10 because 250 of these bags are heavy.


Have you had any issue with getting on an LDS mailing list because of ordering from them?  I don't wish to receive mailers trying to convert me just because I wanted some mylar bags.
Link Posted: 4/21/2008 3:05:58 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 4/21/2008 3:14:31 PM EDT
Damn dude thanx for the hook-up.
Link Posted: 4/21/2008 4:05:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NexQuietus:

Originally Posted By HighLighter:
Mods, If this thread doesn't get tacked there is no justice in the world!



+1

jim


+2 and OST.
Link Posted: 4/21/2008 6:57:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/21/2008 6:59:05 PM EDT by freemanesq]

Originally Posted By vt357:

Originally Posted By freemanesq:

Mylar bags – Whether you have new or used buckets, food grade or not food grade buckets, it’s a wise idea to store your food in something that will be a barrier between the food and the bucket.  You can purchase Mylar bags in various dimensions and thicknesses.  I have purchased large (30” x 20”) 5 mil bags from Sorbient Systems online.   Most recently, I purchased smaller bags (14” x 14”) 7 mil bags from the LDS Church online.  I am not an LDS member, but they don’t care.  The price was good in my opinion (250 bags for $90) with shipping about $10 because 250 of these bags are heavy.


Have you had any issue with getting on an LDS mailing list because of ordering from them?  I don't wish to receive mailers trying to convert me just because I wanted some mylar bags.


Haven't received anything in the mail or anyone coming to the door.  However, if they do show up, I'll make them a deal - we can talk theology if they'll hook me up with a Bishop's Warehouse visit. See www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=10&f=17&t=609339

R.
Link Posted: 4/22/2008 1:05:48 AM EDT
Is there anywhere that I can get smaller packages of O2 absorbers? I want to get started with some rice and flour, but I won't be able to do but about 2 or 3 buckets at first, and I'd like to have to waste alot of absorbers from the larger packs.
Link Posted: 4/22/2008 2:02:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TxAggieA-Batt:
Is there anywhere that I can get smaller packages of O2 absorbers? I want to get started with some rice and flour, but I won't be able to do but about 2 or 3 buckets at first, and I'd like to have to waste alot of absorbers from the larger packs.


I think the Sorbient folks sell O2 absorbers in smaller packs.  My left over packs are still in this jar and are fine.  



Just find something airtight and store the extras till you need them.  I'm about to do another Sam's run with all the rice talk that's going on now.  I won't have to pick up any mylar or O2 absorbers because I've got plently left from the last run.  

R.
Link Posted: 4/22/2008 7:40:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By freemanesq:

Originally Posted By vt357:

Originally Posted By freemanesq:

Mylar bags – Whether you have new or used buckets, food grade or not food grade buckets, it’s a wise idea to store your food in something that will be a barrier between the food and the bucket.  You can purchase Mylar bags in various dimensions and thicknesses.  I have purchased large (30” x 20”) 5 mil bags from Sorbient Systems online.   Most recently, I purchased smaller bags (14” x 14”) 7 mil bags from the LDS Church online.  I am not an LDS member, but they don’t care.  The price was good in my opinion (250 bags for $90) with shipping about $10 because 250 of these bags are heavy.


Have you had any issue with getting on an LDS mailing list because of ordering from them?  I don't wish to receive mailers trying to convert me just because I wanted some mylar bags.


Haven't received anything in the mail or anyone coming to the door.  However, if they do show up, I'll make them a deal - we can talk theology if they'll hook me up with a Bishop's Warehouse visit. See www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=10&f=17&t=609339

R.


Well, I hope they don't come a knock'in (too often), because I just placed an order.  Pretty good deal, I think.  62lbs of beans already in #10 cans shipped from the west coast to Maine, for less then $1/lb shipped.  May not be the beat deal, but I can't find anyplace to buy beans in bulk up here in northern Maine.  I just wished they had something besides Pintos.

FB
Link Posted: 4/29/2008 11:18:19 AM EDT
My wife was given one of the Gamma Seal lids mentioned by the OP.  It seems like a pretty slick product:


We just put a few hundred pounds of four and rice in #10 cans; I had never paid much attention before, but we ended up spending almost as much on cans as we did on the food.  I think we will be using (and reusing) buckets in the future, and only using cans for stuff with an extremely long shelf life that does not need to be rotated regularly.  Unfortunately, all of our storage space is configured for #10 cans.
Link Posted: 4/29/2008 11:23:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By brasidas:
My wife was given one of the Gamma Seal lids mentioned by the OP.  It seems like a pretty slick product:
www.usplastic.com/images/products/buckets/1858p.jpg

We just put a few hundred pounds of four and rice in #10 cans; I had never paid much attention before, but we ended up spending almost as much on cans as we did on the food.  I think we will be using (and reusing) buckets in the future, and only using cans for stuff with an extremely long shelf life that does not need to be rotated regularly.  Unfortunately, all of our storage space is configured for #10 cans.

that's the exact setup that we use.  6 gl bucket and gama seals.  we used regular lids for stuff we know we are going to leave alone for a long time and used the gama seals on things we might need to dip into sooner.
Link Posted: 4/29/2008 7:58:20 PM EDT
Where is the link for the Nitrogen Purging?  Is that the video link at the top of the page #?  I don't think it is, but i just want to make sure.

Jason
Link Posted: 4/29/2008 8:33:23 PM EDT
Great post. Lots of good info.
Link Posted: 4/29/2008 8:47:00 PM EDT
TAG
Link Posted: 4/29/2008 8:54:45 PM EDT
nice
Link Posted: 4/29/2008 9:03:03 PM EDT
OST
Link Posted: 4/30/2008 6:12:45 AM EDT
Great information, thanks for the links.  I see buckets in my immediate future.
Link Posted: 4/30/2008 9:03:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/7/2008 9:52:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By uncool:
Folks if youll refer to training film tremors 2 burt clearly states plastic is not an oxygen barrier...they are fine for short term but when you talk years oxygen will get in and allow things to go bad........and +1 on the mylar in a vacum sealer.....anyone try it ??


This simply is not true.  If you are thinking you are going to long term store foods in ziplock sandwich bags you are wrong (permeable, degrade, yada yada...).   Food Saver bags are fine.  Straight from Food Saver they are not O2 permeable.  I have had a oxyen detector (the lil pink pills that come in your O2 absober packs) sealed up in a food saver bag for 2 1/2 years now,  no color change.  Can provide pics if needed.  

IMHO the problem with Food Saver bags are two fold:

1. Cost - You can get the same size (6 Gal) food saver bag without a bunch of lil ones and wasted space, etc... $$$$

2. Strength - this depends on what you seal.  The food saver bags don't break down over a reasonable (15-20yrs) amount of storage time.  But at sealing if  you aren't careful you can get rice to poke a hole in it, negating the whole idea.  Also as it is plastic if you move your stuff around and seal it tight, you may rub a hole in the plastic.

All this being said, food saver bags are ok to use,  I use Mylar.
Link Posted: 5/7/2008 2:25:16 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 7/27/2008 2:32:38 PM EDT
Back to the top.   Too much good info to go to archive.  
Link Posted: 9/20/2008 6:49:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/21/2008 3:05:53 AM EDT
Tag. Good info.
Link Posted: 9/24/2008 11:00:36 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 9/24/2008 12:05:19 PM EDT
great info, thanks!
Link Posted: 9/24/2008 1:32:01 PM EDT
Great Info.  Thanks OP.

Link Posted: 9/24/2008 1:46:51 PM EDT
Awesome thread! Did this many years ago with 5 gal buckets and dry ice. But need to do a bunch more with the mylar bags and O2 absorbers. Gotta get busy...
Link Posted: 9/24/2008 2:54:47 PM EDT
Thanks a bunch for posting, I will order some of those bags and O2 absorbers pronto.


Link Posted: 9/24/2008 4:55:40 PM EDT
Would it be worth while to put salt in the bucket to aborb moisture?  How about the salt used in water softeners?
Link Posted: 9/24/2008 5:06:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AR15Texan:
Would it be worth while to put salt in the bucket to aborb moisture?  How about the salt used in water softeners?


I've never had any moisture issues but I store the buckets in a dry space that does not have quick temperature changes.  If I felt like I wanted to address moisture, I would go with real desicant.  

I do store salt (it's cheap and I read Alas Babalon) in its own bucket.

R.
Link Posted: 9/24/2008 5:16:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By freemanesq:

Originally Posted By AR15Texan:
Would it be worth while to put salt in the bucket to aborb moisture?  How about the salt used in water softeners?


I've never had any moisture issues but I store the buckets in a dry space that does not have quick temperature changes.  If I felt like I wanted to address moisture, I would go with real desicant.  

I do store salt (it's cheap and I read Alas Babalon) in its own bucket.

R.


Dessicant is poisonous if ingested.  If there was a mix up and someone ate the salt "moisture absorber" they at least wouldn't die.
Link Posted: 9/24/2008 5:29:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/24/2008 5:40:48 PM EDT by gobbledog]

Originally Posted By dread-pirate:
Can you use Mylar bags and a vac. sealer? Do they work well together?



That's what I do. Although since the mylar bag doesn't have the lines in it like the sealer bags. You can't just put the mylar bag in your sealer, suck out the air and then seal it.

I use an iron to seal the bag except for a small hole to put in the tube that came with the sealer. I put an O2 absorber in the bag, insert the tube in the small openin and then suck out all the air. When it is as good as it will get, I use the iron once more to seal up the tube hole. It takes a little more time and technique, but I think it's worth the extra trouble.
Link Posted: 9/24/2008 5:30:10 PM EDT
BTW:

Would a regular vacuum sealing set-up, like the ones Wal-Mart has, work to suck and seal those mylar bags?

That would be a great set-up.

Link Posted: 9/24/2008 5:39:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Danner130:
BTW:

Would a regular vacuum sealing set-up, like the ones Wal-Mart has, work to suck and seal those mylar bags?

That would be a great set-up.


I don't know what Wal-Mart has. But with the kind like the Tila Food Saver, when you 'lock' down the lid thing, it creates a seal on the maylar bag. Because the mylar bag is smooth, no gaps exist through which the machine can suck out the air. I'm assuming it would be the same with what Wal-Mart has.
Link Posted: 9/25/2008 6:46:16 PM EDT
Anyone know where I can get the Mylar bags for cheaper than 100.00? Looked at the LDS store and I cant afford that right now.
P Master
Link Posted: 9/25/2008 7:31:50 PM EDT
Great post.
Link Posted: 9/25/2008 7:51:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By predatormaster:
Anyone know where I can get the Mylar bags for cheaper than 100.00? Looked at the LDS store and I cant afford that right now.
P Master


Try here.

Lotta different price points....but I prefer the thicker bags.
Link Posted: 9/25/2008 8:18:53 PM EDT
Posts like these restore my faith in humanity..........


Thank you for taking the time and effort to share your knowledge on this subject. It could possibly save a persons life one day.
Link Posted: 9/30/2008 12:35:15 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 11/8/2008 4:38:12 PM EDT
Bump for a great thread!
Motivated me to prep 50# of rice and 76# beans today!

I went the LDS route for bags and O2 absorbers.
Thanks freemanesq.
Link Posted: 11/8/2008 4:43:05 PM EDT
tag...Great Post
Link Posted: 11/8/2008 4:55:22 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 11/8/2008 7:21:18 PM EDT
The .pdf file you made of this is outstanding.  You even went to the trouble of including all the photos.  What a great job.  Thank you for your effort.
Link Posted: 11/12/2008 5:17:48 AM EDT
BTT.
Good info. Been putting this off. With constant increase in foodstuffs, the time is now to put food away. What you spend now will cost you double or more soon.
Link Posted: 11/14/2008 1:36:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By fortunesfool223:
Originally Posted By predatormaster:
Anyone know where I can get the Mylar bags for cheaper than 100.00? Looked at the LDS store and I cant afford that right now.
P Master


Try here.

Lotta different price points....but I prefer the thicker bags.

+1 on sorbent systems.  Ordering can be a bit of a pain, but they eventually get it done.

One note on pastas, I have been told that a lot of commercially available (read:  Store bought) pastas have too high of a water content to store long term (i.e. more than a 6mo-1year).  

Also when storing sugar DO NOT put in an O2 absorber.  You will end up with on big, 5 gallon sugar cube.  

If anyone wants some good follow through with this, there are some great videos on youtube that can help with this.  But really this is stupid easy to do, cheap if you dont have to buy buckets or at least pay full price for new ones (if you have to check out u-line, best prices I have found yet), and very effective.
Link Posted: 11/14/2008 1:50:35 AM EDT
In it.
Link Posted: 11/14/2008 3:04:47 AM EDT
So if you can't use O2 absorbers with the sugar, how should that be stored?
Link Posted: 11/15/2008 8:35:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dodgecoltracer:
So if you can't use O2 absorbers with the sugar, how should that be stored?


Sugar and salt (granular stuff) seems to store well without O2 absorbers.  If you do use O2 on sugar, you'll need to run it through a sifter to break it up.  I've stored it with and without and the sugar is fine either way.

R.
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