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Link Posted: 12/21/2015 5:09:08 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By slankford:


So what does this look like in a normal setting like mine?  I live a Waco, TX, work 8 miles from home.  I have a 56 year old wife, married daughter/son-in-law + 6, 4 and 6 month old grandkids.  I'm trying to wrap my mind about the benefit/use of a bug oyt bag.  I carry two handguns, 6 magazines , about 150 rounds total in my vehicle each day.



What is the practical use of several days of supplies for one person?



Just trying to work out these issues, not criticizing.
View Quote




 



Ok.

Whats the use of two sidearms and 150 rounds?

Can those items keep you hydrated in august..keep yu sheltered or fed. How about your wife or grandkids...

How fast can you walk those 8 miles ...do you need to skirt bad areas..what about security...

Or route blckages due wrecks..spills..floods.




I work 40 miles from home my get home bag is your BOB.
Link Posted: 12/21/2015 10:29:11 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By protus:

 

Ok.
Whats the use of two sidearms and 150 rounds?
Can those items keep you hydrated in august..keep yu sheltered or fed. How about your wife or grandkids...
How fast can you walk those 8 miles ...do you need to skirt bad areas..what about security...
Or route blckages due wrecks..spills..floods.


I work 40 miles from home my get home bag is your BOB.
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Originally Posted By protus:
Originally Posted By slankford:
So what does this look like in a normal setting like mine?  I live a Waco, TX, work 8 miles from home.  I have a 56 year old wife, married daughter/son-in-law + 6, 4 and 6 month old grandkids.  I'm trying to wrap my mind about the benefit/use of a bug oyt bag.  I carry two handguns, 6 magazines , about 150 rounds total in my vehicle each day.

What is the practical use of several days of supplies for one person?

Just trying to work out these issues, not criticizing.

 

Ok.
Whats the use of two sidearms and 150 rounds?
Can those items keep you hydrated in august..keep yu sheltered or fed. How about your wife or grandkids...
How fast can you walk those 8 miles ...do you need to skirt bad areas..what about security...
Or route blckages due wrecks..spills..floods.


I work 40 miles from home my get home bag is your BOB.


The rounds help me with my personal security.  I don't need shelter and food between work and home.  I could need hydration but unlikely that I have to walk all 8 miles without access to anything at all.  I see the benefit of self protection, first aid (in different weather conditions), possibly hydration.  I'm just trying to see how the BOB is practical in my situation.  I don't see sheltering overnight, building a fire, needing a tent, etc in my situation.  My struggle is figuring out the ability to shelter in place if a country wide event occurred or how to try and prepare some place to escape to in the same event.  I appreciate the preparation of the BOB but I was trying to apply the logic to my situation here.

My first thought at this point is to 1)make a plan for my extended family for responding to a large event 2) prepare better to shelter in place for some time 3) work out an evacuation plan if we need to leave home.

I'm fully armed at home, but have not put up supplies nor made a BOB for the family.  I'm starting to work that direction and could use insights/opinions.
Link Posted: 12/21/2015 12:02:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/21/2015 12:03:32 PM EDT by bcauz3y]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By slankford:
So what does this look like in a normal setting like mine?  I live a Waco, TX, work 8 miles from home.  I have a 56 year old wife, married daughter/son-in-law + 6, 4 and 6 month old grandkids.  I'm trying to wrap my mind about the benefit/use of a bug oyt bag.  I carry two handguns, 6 magazines , about 150 rounds total in my vehicle each day.

What is the practical use of several days of supplies for one person?

Just trying to work out these issues, not criticizing.
View Quote


We use our bags for lots of stuff. Just think about the items you and your family use everyday.

I carry feminine products for my daughters, a change of underwear/clothes for each of us.(in case we get sick or wet) Some bottled water, a few snacks, etc. First aid in case one of us gets hurt away from home. My wife wears boots and high heels a lot, so I carry some sneakers for her in case she needs to walk a long distance. Overnight stuff in case you have a family emergency and have to leave from work. (toiletries, soap, toothbrush, etc)

These are small things that don't take up much room, and can really be a god-sent should you need them.

If it gets cold where you are, an extra jacket or blanket can be useful.

These are all things that go into my GHB, but double as everyday use items.

If you had to leave town for a few days, what would you need? Once you have that, add in whatever you might need to walk home from work.

Then you're all set!

This isn't just to get home. If you go on a trip, all of these materials are pre-packed for you. Just toss in your car and go.
Link Posted: 12/21/2015 12:07:14 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By bcauz3y:


We use our bags for lots of stuff. Just think about the items you and your family use everyday.

I carry feminine products for my daughters, a change of underwear/clothes for each of us.(in case we get sick or wet) Some bottled water, a few snacks, etc. First aid in case one of us gets hurt away from home. My wife wears boots and high heels a lot, so I carry some sneakers for her in case she needs to walk a long distance. Overnight stuff in case you have a family emergency and have to leave from work. (toiletries, soap, toothbrush, etc)

These are small things that don't take up much room, and can really be a god-sent should you need them.

If it gets cold where you are, an extra jacket or blanket can be useful.

These are all things that go into my GHB, but double as everyday use items.

If you had to leave town for a few days, what would you need? Once you have that, add in whatever you might need to walk home from work.

Then you're all set!

This isn't just to get home. If you go on a trip, all of these materials are pre-packed for you. Just toss in your car and go.
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Originally Posted By bcauz3y:
Originally Posted By slankford:
So what does this look like in a normal setting like mine?  I live a Waco, TX, work 8 miles from home.  I have a 56 year old wife, married daughter/son-in-law + 6, 4 and 6 month old grandkids.  I'm trying to wrap my mind about the benefit/use of a bug oyt bag.  I carry two handguns, 6 magazines , about 150 rounds total in my vehicle each day.

What is the practical use of several days of supplies for one person?

Just trying to work out these issues, not criticizing.


We use our bags for lots of stuff. Just think about the items you and your family use everyday.

I carry feminine products for my daughters, a change of underwear/clothes for each of us.(in case we get sick or wet) Some bottled water, a few snacks, etc. First aid in case one of us gets hurt away from home. My wife wears boots and high heels a lot, so I carry some sneakers for her in case she needs to walk a long distance. Overnight stuff in case you have a family emergency and have to leave from work. (toiletries, soap, toothbrush, etc)

These are small things that don't take up much room, and can really be a god-sent should you need them.

If it gets cold where you are, an extra jacket or blanket can be useful.

These are all things that go into my GHB, but double as everyday use items.

If you had to leave town for a few days, what would you need? Once you have that, add in whatever you might need to walk home from work.

Then you're all set!

This isn't just to get home. If you go on a trip, all of these materials are pre-packed for you. Just toss in your car and go.



bc - that's the kind of response I was hoping for, it makes more sense to me than a "run like hell" bag setup :)

I'll start thinking about those examples you gave me and start working on something that I might keep in a storage container in the cars.

Merry Christmas and have a safe and happy New Year everyone!
Link Posted: 12/21/2015 12:09:21 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By slankford:

I'll start thinking about those examples you gave me and start working on something that I might keep in a storage container in the cars.

Merry Christmas and have a safe and happy New Year everyone!
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That's exactly what I do. I even keep my pack in there. That way, if SHTF, and I need to "bug home", I can put what I need from my container into the pack and hit the road.
Link Posted: 12/23/2015 3:48:02 PM EDT
This thread just cost me a lot of Christmas money.  

Oh well
Link Posted: 12/24/2015 1:46:00 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By RedDane:
This thread just cost me a lot of Christmas money.  

Oh well
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Next time we get together, just have me drag out my gear. I keep it all in the car.

It's all very well tested.
Link Posted: 12/28/2015 2:21:48 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By bcauz3y:


Next time we get together, just have me drag out my gear. I keep it all in the car.

It's all very well tested.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bcauz3y:
Originally Posted By RedDane:
This thread just cost me a lot of Christmas money.  

Oh well


Next time we get together, just have me drag out my gear. I keep it all in the car.

It's all very well tested.


Sounds like a deal.
Link Posted: 12/31/2015 6:54:45 PM EDT
Milspec Monkey Adapt pack with tarp, survival/medical, knife, gun cleaning, skivvy change, MREs, cards, and a Gideons Bible.





Link Posted: 1/3/2016 3:37:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/3/2016 3:44:02 PM EDT by astrocreep96]
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Originally Posted By astrocreep96:
Hey everyone, I don't post much in this forum but I read with interest and thought I'd put my setup into the BoB thread.  My bag is intended to be somewhat of a "catch-all" for whatever I may encounter, from auto breakdowns and unexpected nights on the road to a true bug out situation.  This lives in my car and travels about with me.  I built one about 5 years ago and kept it in the closet after an incident when I was in med school and my apartment complex caught fire.  It's kicked around in some form or another but I recently updated it with a few items and so here it is.

I have a few backpacking books from Chris Townsend and in them he details his backpacking philosophy and general gear reviews and setups.  The books are ancient by now, but the principles remain the same and I like the way he organizes his gear for seasonal use.  My setup here is similar to my setup when backpacking, and generally based off his books.

The items are a combination of old backpacking gear I've had for years (I backpacked a lot when I was younger and worked at an REI in college) as well as some various deals and closeout items I found on the internet.  A few things need to be added to fully round out or improve the setup, among those I'd like a better backpack (got this on a closeout when I worked with REI, it's OK for light hiking but a bit too lightweight for my taste, it seems a bit flimsy), a few nylon straps/buckles for the sleeping pad, I need an epi-pen for the first aid kit as well as a few more pairs of gloves.  I have a bunch of nice German bandage scissors sitting in my briefcase, I need to clean one of them up and throw it in this bag.  I've also been toying around with the idea of getting a wood buck-saw to strap in the outside, I think it would be helpful if I were to need to break down wood for a fire or clear a small obstruction on a road.

Total weight for the bag including all the clothes as well as the pair of shoes, 2L of water, food, etc. comes to 32lbs.  I think if I were to be wearing at least the base layer of clothes and the shoes it would probably drop down to 27lbs or so, further still if I weren't carrying 2L of water.

This is the bag loaded up as it sits in my car...

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/607/21426536471_d19123777f_b.jpg

Sleeping kit including a fleece blanket, 8 x 10 Siltarp, aluminum stakes, 100ft paracord, and a closed cell foam pad.  I used this basic setup a few years ago when I lived in Utah for a 110+ mile hike, although I had some hiking poles to build an a-frame out of the tarp, as well as a mesh bivouac for sleeping.  I'd have to be a little more creative without the poles, but on the other hand I'm not sleeping exclusively above the treeline so it's less of a concern.  I don't love sleeping on a closed cell foam pad, but it gets the job done and works no matter what.  The fleece blanket gets traded out for a sleeping bag once the temperatures drop.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/651/21230011510_370d8be670_b.jpg

Clothing includes a lightweight pair of convertible pants, wicking shirt and underwear, and merino wool socks as well as some Goretex lined low profile hiking shoes.  Outer layers include insulated gloves, merino wool cap, a lightweight fleece jacket, and a Goretex rain jacket.  The combo is surprisingly warm, especially when moving.  I could certainly stand to ditch the fleece jacket and wool cap in the summer here in Kentucky but it's also part of my sleep system so it stays.  I also have a pair of leather-lined work gloves.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5721/21230254638_4bd603a365_b.jpg

Hygiene kit.  This includes bug spray and sunscreen, body wash and deodorant, spare contacts with a case and solution, toothbrush/floss/paste, TP and baby wipes, a camp towel, hand sanitizer and a mirror...

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5788/20797025003_d5741f3412_b.jpg

Navigation and record keeping...

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5754/20796996173_954085e5be_b.jpg

Tools including a 6" fixed blade, leatherman surge MT, black diamond LED headlamp (really old at this point, I need a new one), Surefire 6P Pro 320/15 lumen LED flashlight, candles with a lantern, and an AM/FM/NOAA radio

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/680/21407184122_383b977b25_b.jpg

Food and cooking/fire kit.  2L of water, 3 freeze-dried MH dinners, 3 cliffbars, 6 oatmeal packets, 6 coffee singles, MSR canister stove, titanium pot with a propane/butane canister inside, titanium spork, MSR ceramic water filter (I love this design, though somewhat heavy the ceramic filter can be serviced in the field, but if it drops and hits something like a rock it may crack, I've learned the hard way to be cautious when cleaning it), 2 butane lighters, matches in waterproof container, a magnesium bar with flint, as well as dog food (said incident with apartment fire I had my two dogs and nothing else, it sucked).  The nalgene bottles each have a few yards of duct tape wrapped around them.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5742/21229981630_c917c17f21_b.jpg

First aid setup, including a CAT tourniquet, a couple of 14g pneumodarts, HALO chest seals, izzy bandage, quick-clot, 4x4 gauze, kerlix,  silk tape, steri-strips, face masks (both basic and N95), moleskin, some nitrile gloves, bandaids, misc. crap in the little first aid kit, nail clippers/scissors, and the small pill box.  I need to cannibalize the premade first aid kit and fill it with more gloves and bandaids, it doesn't do much else for me.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5737/21229961470_c7c9dfdefa_b.jpg

The pill-box I bought off Amazon for something like $6, it's pretty cool.  I keep ibuprofen, baby aspirin, loratidine, phenylephrine, famotidine, calcium carbonate tablets, ondansetron, and loperamide, as well as a few bandaids in the kit.  I made little labels indicating the strength, dose, and intended use on the panels, and then stuffed them with cotton balls so it doesn't rattle around...

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/624/21230221588_4f382d70d7_b.jpg

That's all for now.  It wasn't terribly expensive to build since I recycled a lot of old backpacking stuff that I'm not using.  I have a few changes to make, most pressing is the bag itself.  I'd like something a bit more sturdy and a better way to carry the foam pad, I'm thinking of stopping by REI the next time I'm visiting family in Salt Lake City to get a Gregory or Osprey, although looking through this thread companies like Mystery Ranch and Eberlestock have some nice stuff too.  You'll note I don't keep a gun in my pack - since it sits in my car and my car sits at work, or my kids play in my car, I haven't left one in the pack.  I'm not totally opposed to it, but not convinced either.  I certainly recognize its utility, but I'm relying on my CCW for that purpose for now.
View Quote



I've updated my BOB for winter weather.  I like the idea of putting the thermarest in the pack but there is definitely not enough room.

Changes I've made include straps to secure the sleeping pad instead of paracord, a folding buck-saw, and a 0 F rated synthetic sleeping pad; I took out the fleece blanket I had in the pack.  It all fits, but just barely.  I haven't weighed it again but I suspect it sits at around 35 pounds right now - If I were to wear the clothing and shoes probably 30 pounds to carry.

The sleeping bag, a Mountain Hardware Hyper Lamina 0 degree synthetic bag I found on clearance (outgoing model).  I don't think it would really last down to 0 unless I was wearing a few layers of clothes.



The buck-saw I bought off Etsy, of all places.  This combined with my fixed blade knife should nicely take the place of a hatchet (I've taken my hatchet out on trips in the past and not found it to do anything more than I can do with a rock in regards to breaking down wood for fires, plus I think this will do better on wet wood if needed)





The pack, as it sits in my FJ...



Also, as a side note, here is a winter pack I added to my car.  I built a similar one for my wife, with the addition of  an emergency candle set, and without the clothing.  Mine has a wool blanket, an old Primaloft hood jacket from REI, a really old set of stretch fleece pants as well as a heavy cotton pair of cargo pants from Cabelas, a few handwarmers, and some MREs.  It sits in the back of my car in a recycled grocery store bag.  This is as much comfort things for my family if we were stuck in the car during a snowstorm.








Link Posted: 1/9/2016 2:28:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2016 10:38:15 PM EDT by Saxplayer]
Here is my work in progress. I'll have to get some pics of the contents, but here is a list of what I have.
Pack: Kelty Coyote 80

Top Cover: This comes off to become a lumbar pack.
Small IFAK
Paracord
Compass/maps
Waterproof matches/blast match
Gloves
Headlamp
Main compartment
Large IFAK
Sawyer mini squeeze filter
Mountain House meals x6
Sleeping bag (Marmot Nanowave 50)
Poncho
Floppy hat
Change of socks x2
Diabetes supplies (type 1 diabetic)
Misc drink mixes (coffee, fruit punch, lemonade, etc...)
AAA batteries (flashlight, headlamp, insulin pump)
Outer left pocket
Esbit tablets/stove
Windproof lighter
Ditty bags x3
Outer right pocket
Stanley cookset
Misc spices
Spork
Left belt pocket
Cell phone
Flashlight
Right belt pocket
Glucose tablets
Bottom
Tarp/tent
Diabetes supplies
Infusion sets for insulin pump x2
Insertion device
Skin tack wipes x4
Alcohol prep wipes x 12
Test strips, 1 vial, 50 strips
Lancets/spare lancet pen
Insulin syringes
Sharps container
Glucagon shot
Jar of glucose tablets
ETA, with everything in it, my pack weighs 17 pounds.
ETA2. tent is a Eureka Solitaire. 2 pounds 10 ounces.
Link Posted: 7/1/2016 6:59:29 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By astrocreep96:
I've updated my BOB for winter weather.  I like the idea of putting the thermarest in the pack but there is definitely not enough room.



Changes I've made include straps to secure the sleeping pad instead of paracord, a folding buck-saw, and a 0 F rated synthetic sleeping pad; I took out the fleece blanket I had in the pack.  It all fits, but just barely.  I haven't weighed it again but I suspect it sits at around 35 pounds right now - If I were to wear the clothing and shoes probably 30 pounds to carry.



The sleeping bag, a Mountain Hardware Hyper Lamina 0 degree synthetic bag I found on clearance (outgoing model).  I don't think it would really last down to 0 unless I was wearing a few layers of clothes.



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5781/23527058183_ae80b4d4b9_h.jpg



The buck-saw I bought off Etsy, of all places.  This combined with my fixed blade knife should nicely take the place of a hatchet (I've taken my hatchet out on trips in the past and not found it to do anything more than I can do with a rock in regards to breaking down wood for fires, plus I think this will do better on wet wood if needed)



https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1538/24071237631_4fd69a37f3_h.jpg



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5759/23527074253_1e54e30668_h.jpg



The pack, as it sits in my FJ...



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5744/23858219930_aed5b28921_h.jpg



Also, as a side note, here is a winter pack I added to my car.  I built a similar one for my wife, with the addition of  an emergency candle set, and without the clothing.  Mine has a wool blanket, an old Primaloft hood jacket from REI, a really old set of stretch fleece pants as well as a heavy cotton pair of cargo pants from Cabelas, a few handwarmers, and some MREs.  It sits in the back of my car in a recycled grocery store bag.  This is as much comfort things for my family if we were stuck in the car during a snowstorm.



https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1605/23527077533_daeea846cb_h.jpg



https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1584/23858222950_061b460765_h.jpg
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By astrocreep96:



Originally Posted By astrocreep96:

Hey everyone, I don't post much in this forum but I read with interest and thought I'd put my setup into the BoB thread.  My bag is intended to be somewhat of a "catch-all" for whatever I may encounter, from auto breakdowns and unexpected nights on the road to a true bug out situation.  This lives in my car and travels about with me.  I built one about 5 years ago and kept it in the closet after an incident when I was in med school and my apartment complex caught fire.  It's kicked around in some form or another but I recently updated it with a few items and so here it is.



I have a few backpacking books from Chris Townsend and in them he details his backpacking philosophy and general gear reviews and setups.  The books are ancient by now, but the principles remain the same and I like the way he organizes his gear for seasonal use.  My setup here is similar to my setup when backpacking, and generally based off his books.



The items are a combination of old backpacking gear I've had for years (I backpacked a lot when I was younger and worked at an REI in college) as well as some various deals and closeout items I found on the internet.  A few things need to be added to fully round out or improve the setup, among those I'd like a better backpack (got this on a closeout when I worked with REI, it's OK for light hiking but a bit too lightweight for my taste, it seems a bit flimsy), a few nylon straps/buckles for the sleeping pad, I need an epi-pen for the first aid kit as well as a few more pairs of gloves.  I have a bunch of nice German bandage scissors sitting in my briefcase, I need to clean one of them up and throw it in this bag.  I've also been toying around with the idea of getting a wood buck-saw to strap in the outside, I think it would be helpful if I were to need to break down wood for a fire or clear a small obstruction on a road.



Total weight for the bag including all the clothes as well as the pair of shoes, 2L of water, food, etc. comes to 32lbs.  I think if I were to be wearing at least the base layer of clothes and the shoes it would probably drop down to 27lbs or so, further still if I weren't carrying 2L of water.



This is the bag loaded up as it sits in my car...



https://farm1.staticflickr.com/607/21426536471_d19123777f_b.jpg



Sleeping kit including a fleece blanket, 8 x 10 Siltarp, aluminum stakes, 100ft paracord, and a closed cell foam pad.  I used this basic setup a few years ago when I lived in Utah for a 110+ mile hike, although I had some hiking poles to build an a-frame out of the tarp, as well as a mesh bivouac for sleeping.  I'd have to be a little more creative without the poles, but on the other hand I'm not sleeping exclusively above the treeline so it's less of a concern.  I don't love sleeping on a closed cell foam pad, but it gets the job done and works no matter what.  The fleece blanket gets traded out for a sleeping bag once the temperatures drop.



https://farm1.staticflickr.com/651/21230011510_370d8be670_b.jpg



Clothing includes a lightweight pair of convertible pants, wicking shirt and underwear, and merino wool socks as well as some Goretex lined low profile hiking shoes.  Outer layers include insulated gloves, merino wool cap, a lightweight fleece jacket, and a Goretex rain jacket.  The combo is surprisingly warm, especially when moving.  I could certainly stand to ditch the fleece jacket and wool cap in the summer here in Kentucky but it's also part of my sleep system so it stays.  I also have a pair of leather-lined work gloves.



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5721/21230254638_4bd603a365_b.jpg



Hygiene kit.  This includes bug spray and sunscreen, body wash and deodorant, spare contacts with a case and solution, toothbrush/floss/paste, TP and baby wipes, a camp towel, hand sanitizer and a mirror...



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5788/20797025003_d5741f3412_b.jpg



Navigation and record keeping...



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5754/20796996173_954085e5be_b.jpg



Tools including a 6" fixed blade, leatherman surge MT, black diamond LED headlamp (really old at this point, I need a new one), Surefire 6P Pro 320/15 lumen LED flashlight, candles with a lantern, and an AM/FM/NOAA radio



https://farm1.staticflickr.com/680/21407184122_383b977b25_b.jpg



Food and cooking/fire kit.  2L of water, 3 freeze-dried MH dinners, 3 cliffbars, 6 oatmeal packets, 6 coffee singles, MSR canister stove, titanium pot with a propane/butane canister inside, titanium spork, MSR ceramic water filter (I love this design, though somewhat heavy the ceramic filter can be serviced in the field, but if it drops and hits something like a rock it may crack, I've learned the hard way to be cautious when cleaning it), 2 butane lighters, matches in waterproof container, a magnesium bar with flint, as well as dog food (said incident with apartment fire I had my two dogs and nothing else, it sucked).  The nalgene bottles each have a few yards of duct tape wrapped around them.



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5742/21229981630_c917c17f21_b.jpg



First aid setup, including a CAT tourniquet, a couple of 14g pneumodarts, HALO chest seals, izzy bandage, quick-clot, 4x4 gauze, kerlix,  silk tape, steri-strips, face masks (both basic and N95), moleskin, some nitrile gloves, bandaids, misc. crap in the little first aid kit, nail clippers/scissors, and the small pill box.  I need to cannibalize the premade first aid kit and fill it with more gloves and bandaids, it doesn't do much else for me.



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5737/21229961470_c7c9dfdefa_b.jpg



The pill-box I bought off Amazon for something like $6, it's pretty cool.  I keep ibuprofen, baby aspirin, loratidine, phenylephrine, famotidine, calcium carbonate tablets, ondansetron, and loperamide, as well as a few bandaids in the kit.  I made little labels indicating the strength, dose, and intended use on the panels, and then stuffed them with cotton balls so it doesn't rattle around...



https://farm1.staticflickr.com/624/21230221588_4f382d70d7_b.jpg



That's all for now.  It wasn't terribly expensive to build since I recycled a lot of old backpacking stuff that I'm not using.  I have a few changes to make, most pressing is the bag itself.  I'd like something a bit more sturdy and a better way to carry the foam pad, I'm thinking of stopping by REI the next time I'm visiting family in Salt Lake City to get a Gregory or Osprey, although looking through this thread companies like Mystery Ranch and Eberlestock have some nice stuff too.  You'll note I don't keep a gun in my pack - since it sits in my car and my car sits at work, or my kids play in my car, I haven't left one in the pack.  I'm not totally opposed to it, but not convinced either.  I certainly recognize its utility, but I'm relying on my CCW for that purpose for now.






I've updated my BOB for winter weather.  I like the idea of putting the thermarest in the pack but there is definitely not enough room.



Changes I've made include straps to secure the sleeping pad instead of paracord, a folding buck-saw, and a 0 F rated synthetic sleeping pad; I took out the fleece blanket I had in the pack.  It all fits, but just barely.  I haven't weighed it again but I suspect it sits at around 35 pounds right now - If I were to wear the clothing and shoes probably 30 pounds to carry.



The sleeping bag, a Mountain Hardware Hyper Lamina 0 degree synthetic bag I found on clearance (outgoing model).  I don't think it would really last down to 0 unless I was wearing a few layers of clothes.



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5781/23527058183_ae80b4d4b9_h.jpg



The buck-saw I bought off Etsy, of all places.  This combined with my fixed blade knife should nicely take the place of a hatchet (I've taken my hatchet out on trips in the past and not found it to do anything more than I can do with a rock in regards to breaking down wood for fires, plus I think this will do better on wet wood if needed)



https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1538/24071237631_4fd69a37f3_h.jpg



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5759/23527074253_1e54e30668_h.jpg



The pack, as it sits in my FJ...



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5744/23858219930_aed5b28921_h.jpg



Also, as a side note, here is a winter pack I added to my car.  I built a similar one for my wife, with the addition of  an emergency candle set, and without the clothing.  Mine has a wool blanket, an old Primaloft hood jacket from REI, a really old set of stretch fleece pants as well as a heavy cotton pair of cargo pants from Cabelas, a few handwarmers, and some MREs.  It sits in the back of my car in a recycled grocery store bag.  This is as much comfort things for my family if we were stuck in the car during a snowstorm.



https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1605/23527077533_daeea846cb_h.jpg



https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1584/23858222950_061b460765_h.jpg
I think I know why that bag was on clearance.

 
Link Posted: 9/10/2016 9:02:55 PM EDT
BOB Afghanistan from 2015

Source Patrol pack on DR
Link Posted: 9/24/2016 9:34:25 PM EDT
bump to keep alive
Link Posted: 1/18/2017 4:14:24 PM EDT
I have a BoB that is set up pretty well. I do carry an Everyday 24 hours rush pack/get home bag too. it's always within arms reach.
general items
Food/Water - Mountain House and snacks. Naglene bottle (always filled) and filter straw, also some coleman water tabs.
Clothing - Boonie hat, shemagh scarf, pancho, gloves, change of socks. light long sleeve under armor. (bivy)
Navigation - road map and topo maps of my area (no markings), compass, eTrex GPS. Beofang radio (FRS programmed and local frequencies to monitor)
FAK - Quick Clot, tourniquet, chest seal, SAM splint, bandages and dressings, stitch kit and butterfly stitches. two N95 masks
Tools - flashlight (150 lumen), paracord, small hatchet, firestarter, lighter, contractor bag, extra pocket knife.
Misc - Benadryl Stick, OFF spray (Florida), tylenol, zantac, pepto and advil tabs. hot hands,
I have my EDC firearm and spare mags but I also keep a holstered .38spl and extra ammo in the bag.

I'll add a pic later.
Link Posted: 3/18/2017 3:09:56 AM EDT
Bump
Link Posted: 3/18/2017 3:23:53 AM EDT
Some good ideas from a SERE instructor:

Basic Long Range / Survival Pack Setup
Link Posted: 3/25/2017 3:40:35 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Brap_and_Bang:
Some good ideas from a SERE instructor:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1cCPltvoUs
View Quote
Nice!
Link Posted: 5/14/2017 9:13:16 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gitarmac:
I think I know why that bag was on clearance.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gitarmac:
Originally Posted By astrocreep96:

Originally Posted By astrocreep96:
Hey everyone, I don't post much in this forum but I read with interest and thought I'd put my setup into the BoB thread.  My bag is intended to be somewhat of a "catch-all" for whatever I may encounter, from auto breakdowns and unexpected nights on the road to a true bug out situation.  This lives in my car and travels about with me.  I built one about 5 years ago and kept it in the closet after an incident when I was in med school and my apartment complex caught fire.  It's kicked around in some form or another but I recently updated it with a few items and so here it is.

I have a few backpacking books from Chris Townsend and in them he details his backpacking philosophy and general gear reviews and setups.  The books are ancient by now, but the principles remain the same and I like the way he organizes his gear for seasonal use.  My setup here is similar to my setup when backpacking, and generally based off his books.

The items are a combination of old backpacking gear I've had for years (I backpacked a lot when I was younger and worked at an REI in college) as well as some various deals and closeout items I found on the internet.  A few things need to be added to fully round out or improve the setup, among those I'd like a better backpack (got this on a closeout when I worked with REI, it's OK for light hiking but a bit too lightweight for my taste, it seems a bit flimsy), a few nylon straps/buckles for the sleeping pad, I need an epi-pen for the first aid kit as well as a few more pairs of gloves.  I have a bunch of nice German bandage scissors sitting in my briefcase, I need to clean one of them up and throw it in this bag.  I've also been toying around with the idea of getting a wood buck-saw to strap in the outside, I think it would be helpful if I were to need to break down wood for a fire or clear a small obstruction on a road.

Total weight for the bag including all the clothes as well as the pair of shoes, 2L of water, food, etc. comes to 32lbs.  I think if I were to be wearing at least the base layer of clothes and the shoes it would probably drop down to 27lbs or so, further still if I weren't carrying 2L of water.

This is the bag loaded up as it sits in my car...

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/607/21426536471_d19123777f_b.jpg

Sleeping kit including a fleece blanket, 8 x 10 Siltarp, aluminum stakes, 100ft paracord, and a closed cell foam pad.  I used this basic setup a few years ago when I lived in Utah for a 110+ mile hike, although I had some hiking poles to build an a-frame out of the tarp, as well as a mesh bivouac for sleeping.  I'd have to be a little more creative without the poles, but on the other hand I'm not sleeping exclusively above the treeline so it's less of a concern.  I don't love sleeping on a closed cell foam pad, but it gets the job done and works no matter what.  The fleece blanket gets traded out for a sleeping bag once the temperatures drop.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/651/21230011510_370d8be670_b.jpg

Clothing includes a lightweight pair of convertible pants, wicking shirt and underwear, and merino wool socks as well as some Goretex lined low profile hiking shoes.  Outer layers include insulated gloves, merino wool cap, a lightweight fleece jacket, and a Goretex rain jacket.  The combo is surprisingly warm, especially when moving.  I could certainly stand to ditch the fleece jacket and wool cap in the summer here in Kentucky but it's also part of my sleep system so it stays.  I also have a pair of leather-lined work gloves.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5721/21230254638_4bd603a365_b.jpg

Hygiene kit.  This includes bug spray and sunscreen, body wash and deodorant, spare contacts with a case and solution, toothbrush/floss/paste, TP and baby wipes, a camp towel, hand sanitizer and a mirror...

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5788/20797025003_d5741f3412_b.jpg

Navigation and record keeping...

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5754/20796996173_954085e5be_b.jpg

Tools including a 6" fixed blade, leatherman surge MT, black diamond LED headlamp (really old at this point, I need a new one), Surefire 6P Pro 320/15 lumen LED flashlight, candles with a lantern, and an AM/FM/NOAA radio

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/680/21407184122_383b977b25_b.jpg

Food and cooking/fire kit.  2L of water, 3 freeze-dried MH dinners, 3 cliffbars, 6 oatmeal packets, 6 coffee singles, MSR canister stove, titanium pot with a propane/butane canister inside, titanium spork, MSR ceramic water filter (I love this design, though somewhat heavy the ceramic filter can be serviced in the field, but if it drops and hits something like a rock it may crack, I've learned the hard way to be cautious when cleaning it), 2 butane lighters, matches in waterproof container, a magnesium bar with flint, as well as dog food (said incident with apartment fire I had my two dogs and nothing else, it sucked).  The nalgene bottles each have a few yards of duct tape wrapped around them.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5742/21229981630_c917c17f21_b.jpg

First aid setup, including a CAT tourniquet, a couple of 14g pneumodarts, HALO chest seals, izzy bandage, quick-clot, 4x4 gauze, kerlix,  silk tape, steri-strips, face masks (both basic and N95), moleskin, some nitrile gloves, bandaids, misc. crap in the little first aid kit, nail clippers/scissors, and the small pill box.  I need to cannibalize the premade first aid kit and fill it with more gloves and bandaids, it doesn't do much else for me.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5737/21229961470_c7c9dfdefa_b.jpg

The pill-box I bought off Amazon for something like $6, it's pretty cool.  I keep ibuprofen, baby aspirin, loratidine, phenylephrine, famotidine, calcium carbonate tablets, ondansetron, and loperamide, as well as a few bandaids in the kit.  I made little labels indicating the strength, dose, and intended use on the panels, and then stuffed them with cotton balls so it doesn't rattle around...

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/624/21230221588_4f382d70d7_b.jpg

That's all for now.  It wasn't terribly expensive to build since I recycled a lot of old backpacking stuff that I'm not using.  I have a few changes to make, most pressing is the bag itself.  I'd like something a bit more sturdy and a better way to carry the foam pad, I'm thinking of stopping by REI the next time I'm visiting family in Salt Lake City to get a Gregory or Osprey, although looking through this thread companies like Mystery Ranch and Eberlestock have some nice stuff too.  You'll note I don't keep a gun in my pack - since it sits in my car and my car sits at work, or my kids play in my car, I haven't left one in the pack.  I'm not totally opposed to it, but not convinced either.  I certainly recognize its utility, but I'm relying on my CCW for that purpose for now.
I've updated my BOB for winter weather.  I like the idea of putting the thermarest in the pack but there is definitely not enough room.

Changes I've made include straps to secure the sleeping pad instead of paracord, a folding buck-saw, and a 0 F rated synthetic sleeping pad; I took out the fleece blanket I had in the pack.  It all fits, but just barely.  I haven't weighed it again but I suspect it sits at around 35 pounds right now - If I were to wear the clothing and shoes probably 30 pounds to carry.

The sleeping bag, a Mountain Hardware Hyper Lamina 0 degree synthetic bag I found on clearance (outgoing model).  I don't think it would really last down to 0 unless I was wearing a few layers of clothes.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5781/23527058183_ae80b4d4b9_h.jpg

The buck-saw I bought off Etsy, of all places.  This combined with my fixed blade knife should nicely take the place of a hatchet (I've taken my hatchet out on trips in the past and not found it to do anything more than I can do with a rock in regards to breaking down wood for fires, plus I think this will do better on wet wood if needed)

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1538/24071237631_4fd69a37f3_h.jpg

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5759/23527074253_1e54e30668_h.jpg

The pack, as it sits in my FJ...

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5744/23858219930_aed5b28921_h.jpg

Also, as a side note, here is a winter pack I added to my car.  I built a similar one for my wife, with the addition of  an emergency candle set, and without the clothing.  Mine has a wool blanket, an old Primaloft hood jacket from REI, a really old set of stretch fleece pants as well as a heavy cotton pair of cargo pants from Cabelas, a few handwarmers, and some MREs.  It sits in the back of my car in a recycled grocery store bag.  This is as much comfort things for my family if we were stuck in the car during a snowstorm.

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1605/23527077533_daeea846cb_h.jpg

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1584/23858222950_061b460765_h.jpg
I think I know why that bag was on clearance.
I had that exact thought the second I saw it.
Link Posted: 5/16/2017 3:18:05 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Brap_and_Bang:
Some good ideas from a SERE instructor:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1cCPltvoUs
View Quote
This guy is fucking awesome. I love his videos.
Link Posted: 5/21/2017 9:38:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/22/2017 4:26:59 PM EDT by Alien]
I recently purchased a used Arc'teryx Echo backpack (medium 54L) for overnight/extended camping trips and also have it setup as a bugout bag. It's an awesome bag. My only complaint is that there's no MOLLE/PALS webbing on the hip belt and no side pockets. I'm pretty sure the hip belt can be swapped out for my Eberlestock battleship's belt or I can buy a new Eberlestock belt altogether. USMIC surplus side plate pouches can also be used for pockets, so those two complaints aren't huge deals, but a MOLLE pouch on the hip belt is where I keep my pistol when I'm using the Eberelstock Battleship.

Although I do have the aforementioned Eberlestock Battleship that can be used for an I'm not an I'm not coming home bag, that's not what this is, although I could get by pretty well with it. Here's everything I have packed inside of it at the moment. There are no first aid supplies as I have everything in a MOLLE FAK pouch in the bathroom at the moment, but that could easily be attached at a moment's notice and I plan to draw supplies from it for camping trips.  I also have a Carinthia Tropen http://www.military-sleeping-bags.com/?page_id=1263  and Carinthia Defence 4 http://www.military-sleeping-bags.com/?page_id=1332 sleeping bags (which are the exact same bags as Eberelestock's Ultralight and Reveille sleeping bags) on the way from Europe. I plan to replace the USGI patrol bag with the Tropen when it gets here as it packs smaller, insulates better, and is lighter. I could probably fit the Defence 4 bag in it with the same gear but I'm not sure. I also have a few other things I may throw in when I go camping like my Morakniv knife, extra sunglasses, etc, rain poncho. Contents are as follows and comes out to around 40 pounds w/ 2 liters of water in the bag:

http://i.imgur.com/nNfvAcZ.jpg



Tools/Wood processing:
Council Tool Woodcraft 23" pack axe
Bahco Laplander saw
Schrade SCHF52 knife w/ lighter, Lansky sharpener, and ferro rod (I actually have a Ka-Bar Becker BK-7 but I prefer the blade profile on the Schrade)
Gerber Suspension multitool (need to get a Leatherman or better Gerber model)

Shelter & Sleep system:
Nemo Galaxi 2P tent in subdued brown earth color w/ extra stakes
USGI patrol bag (to be replaced very soon with a Carinthia Tropen bag)
Klymit Static V insulated sleeping pad
Klymit X inflatable pillow

Cordage:
Paracord spool tool w/ 30+ feet of 550 cord, 50-60ish feet of #36 bank line, 100-120ish feet of #18 bank line, and small bic lighter
12 feet of thin gauge steel cable

Cooking and firekit:
Optimus Crux stove w/ 8 oz fuel cannister and Terra cook set and windscreen
RUCUS alcohol Stove w/ 8 oz bottle of methanol (redundancy)
Pill bottle stuffed w/ Vaseline soaked cottonballs
Large pill bottle w/ 6 Esbit fuel cubes
3 Bic lighters
1 Schrade ferro rod
1 book of matches
Pocket Bellows to feed air to fires (ingenious/cool little product)
Light my fire titanium spork

Clothing:
Tru-spec coyote boonie hat
Mechanix coyote gloves
2 pairs of wool Kirkland socks
1 clean pair of Adidas moisture wicking synthetic underwear
1 clean Old Navy synthetic moisture wicking athletic shirt

Health/Medical related stuff
1 ankle brace and thick sock for ankle injuries
Purel sanitizing wipes (need to get some baby wipes too)
1 bottle of Coppertone 50SPF waterproof sunblock
1 spray can of bug off bug spray
1 roll of toilet paper in sealed freezer bag
1 travel size tube of toothpaste
1 travel size bottle of gold bond powder
1 toothbrush sealed in a Hefty freezer bag
1 stick of Body Glide
1 small pill bottle w/ Imodium, Ibuprofen, and Excedrin
earplugs
Will draw supplies from large IFAK I have (Quikclot sponge, gauze, bandaids)

Water:
Camelbak Omega 3L w/ insulating bladder & line sleeve
1 40oz Klean Kanteen stainless bottle
2 1 liter Smart Water bottles to fill the Camelbak (have lots of bottled water on hand actually but these are already in the bag)
Sawyer filter
1 32oz Nalgene bottle
several coffee filters for sediment
1 Hefty brand freezer bag

Food:
2 Kirkland protein bars (Quest bar clones)
2 Mountainhouse meals
1 pack of gum
2 MRE drink packets

Lights & power
1 Brila mini lantern w/ 2 AA batteries
1 Jetbeam multimoad 2 AA flashlight w/ batteries
1 Petzel Tactikka headlamp w/ rechargeable battery
1 cheap Rayovac or Energizer headlamp w/ 3 AAA batteries for redundancy
1 cheap rechargeable Chinese Nitecore MH20 flashlight clone (puts out an amazing amount of light. might replace this with a namebrand unit soon)
1 ThruNite Ti3 EDC AAA flashlight (on my keyring)
Anker 20,000mAH battery bank
Anker 3 panel solar charger w/ spare micro USB cables
8 spare AA batteries
8 spare AAA batteries

Navigation:
Smartphone w/ Gaia GPS w/ maps of entire state
Garmin GPS (need to get a more modern one
Silva compass

Misc:
Rite in the Rain notebook w/ pencil
Outdoor Research coyote drybag (clothing is in this)
2 compression straps/webbing for lashing/compressing
Not pictured 2 heavy duty garbage bags
REI thermometer & compass zipper pull on sternum strap
Niteize carabiners (need to get a couple of load bearing ones)
M&P 9mm w/ spare mag
Eberlestock pack rain cover

I may have forgotten a few things. Some of this stuff I can obviously omit to save weight for an overnight camping trip but I wanted it packed as a bug out bag in the mean time. I of course also have my rifle and plenty of ammo to grab if the situation arises and I can easily affix it to my pack.




Link Posted: 5/23/2017 9:57:11 AM EDT
Interesting.

There is a LOT of money in/on that pack. But it's obvious you didn't just throw money at it. It's very well thought out, and the expensive stuff is good expensive stuff.

Bravo.

I have some critiques, but I need to take the time to type them out.
Link Posted: 5/23/2017 1:53:32 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By astrocreep96:



I've updated my BOB for winter weather.  I like the idea of putting the thermarest in the pack but there is definitely not enough room.

Changes I've made include straps to secure the sleeping pad instead of paracord, a folding buck-saw, and a 0 F rated synthetic sleeping pad; I took out the fleece blanket I had in the pack.  It all fits, but just barely.  I haven't weighed it again but I suspect it sits at around 35 pounds right now - If I were to wear the clothing and shoes probably 30 pounds to carry.

The sleeping bag, a Mountain Hardware Hyper Lamina 0 degree synthetic bag I found on clearance (outgoing model).  I don't think it would really last down to 0 unless I was wearing a few layers of clothes.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5781/23527058183_ae80b4d4b9_h.jpg

The buck-saw I bought off Etsy, of all places.  This combined with my fixed blade knife should nicely take the place of a hatchet (I've taken my hatchet out on trips in the past and not found it to do anything more than I can do with a rock in regards to breaking down wood for fires, plus I think this will do better on wet wood if needed)

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1538/24071237631_4fd69a37f3_h.jpg

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5759/23527074253_1e54e30668_h.jpg

The pack, as it sits in my FJ...

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5744/23858219930_aed5b28921_h.jpg

Also, as a side note, here is a winter pack I added to my car.  I built a similar one for my wife, with the addition of  an emergency candle set, and without the clothing.  Mine has a wool blanket, an old Primaloft hood jacket from REI, a really old set of stretch fleece pants as well as a heavy cotton pair of cargo pants from Cabelas, a few handwarmers, and some MREs.  It sits in the back of my car in a recycled grocery store bag.  This is as much comfort things for my family if we were stuck in the car during a snowstorm.

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1605/23527077533_daeea846cb_h.jpg

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1584/23858222950_061b460765_h.jpg
View Quote
I really like the idea of the shopping back as a winter car kit. It's totally 'grey man' too, if you needed to walk. A lot of people think a backpack is the only answer. I have a duffle bag with a GP strap attached to it with para cord (It squeaked in the airport so I lost the plastic clips) that is very convenient for most travel. I've slung it and hiked it, and while not as comfortable as a pack, it's doable, and better in some ways, such as carrying weapons. Nice to see people thinking outside the box.
Link Posted: 5/23/2017 10:19:33 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bcauz3y:
Interesting.

There is a LOT of money in/on that pack. But it's obvious you didn't just throw money at it. It's very well thought out, and the expensive stuff is good expensive stuff.

Bravo.

I have some critiques, but I need to take the time to type them out.
View Quote
It's a work in progress and I welcome feedback!
Link Posted: 5/24/2017 10:48:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/24/2017 7:59:26 PM EDT by bcauz3y]
Sorry I got side tracked.

Klymit Insulated Sleeping Pad - Check out the Big Agnes Insulated Air Core, the material is thicker, and it's more comfortable. I've had a few Klymit's and others get holes when I didn't think they should. Just a minor thing, others might not run into the same issues I did. The Big Agnes has lasted longer for me than any other ones.

Garmin GPS - You mentioned getting a more modern one, I much prefer the Foretrex 401 over any of the big heavy fancy ones with mario bros and shit on them. For the most part, all I want is two features - Tell me where I am, and give me a direction of travel.

Silva compass - Not a fan of that compass style. For serious orienteering (Something I teach a few times a year), I always go with a sighting mirror model.  IMO, the Suunto MC-2 is the sex of compasses.

Also, I didn't look super close at your gear to see if you had pace beads, but they're a good backup to a GPS when paired with a compass. Of course, you probably already know that.

Me and the mancub on an orienteering course. (foretrex and pace beads visible)



Great gear man, it'll serve you like a boss.
Link Posted: 6/2/2017 6:22:29 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bcauz3y:
Sorry I got side tracked.

Klymit Insulated Sleeping Pad - Check out the Big Agnes Insulated Air Core, the material is thicker, and it's more comfortable. I've had a few Klymit's and others get holes when I didn't think they should. Just a minor thing, others might not run into the same issues I did. The Big Agnes has lasted longer for me than any other ones.

Garmin GPS - You mentioned getting a more modern one, I much prefer the Foretrex 401 over any of the big heavy fancy ones with mario bros and shit on them. For the most part, all I want is two features - Tell me where I am, and give me a direction of travel.

Silva compass - Not a fan of that compass style. For serious orienteering (Something I teach a few times a year), I always go with a sighting mirror model.  IMO, the Suunto MC-2 is the sex of compasses.

Also, I didn't look super close at your gear to see if you had pace beads, but they're a good backup to a GPS when paired with a compass. Of course, you probably already know that.

Me and the mancub on an orienteering course. (foretrex and pace beads visible)

http://i1123.photobucket.com/albums/l543/bobjonesar15/614f623a-c655-4d0b-bdba-33f127f2b03d_zps8l1bqdml.jpg

Great gear man, it'll serve you like a boss.
View Quote
Why's there a leash on your cub....:p


I've gotta get a better compass. I carry two. A basic Silva and a cammengea.(spelling).
Link Posted: 6/2/2017 3:52:11 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By protus:
Why's there a leash on your cub....:p
View Quote


Gotta keep tabs on him, you know.
Link Posted: 8/12/2017 10:23:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/13/2017 12:13:21 AM EDT by KodiakZach]
WEIGHT:
- Current packed weight (including my hiking backpack) = 29lb
- My ideal "target" weight = 30lbs or less
- Realistic weight when I get done adding = 33-34lbs

CURRENTLY PACKED ITEMS:

Bag/Storage/Organization:
- Jansport Katahdin 70L hiking backpack / 58oz
- 5L Dry bag for clothes
- 5L Dry bag for food
- 5L Stuff bag
- Crown royal stuff bag :)
- (2) Molle bags for fire kit and ammo
- (3) 1 gallon zip locks
- (6) sandwich zip locks
- (4) 1/2 sandwich zip locks

Tools:
- 50-ft Paracord 550
- UST card survival tool
- UST Survival playing cards
- Micro toolset w/ hammer + nails
- Zip ties (sm/med/lrg)
- Pliers small
- Large contractor grade trash bag
- Bahco Folding saw
- Mousetrap
- Small Paintbrush
- Sewing kit
- Duct tape (2) mini rolls
- Field dressing kit w/ Nitril gloves and covers

Shelter/Protection:
- Tent 2 Person (6x5) / 64oz
- Tarp 6x8 (medium duty) / 14oz
- Sleeping Bag (40 degree) / 48oz
- (1) Poncho (good Frogg Togg's)
- (1) Poncho (med. grade)
- (2) Solar blankets
- .40 cal Mod2 sub compact 9 rd mag
- (2) loaded .40 cal 12 rd mags
- Kershaw Camp 10" machete
- Buck multi-blade EDC knife

Clothing:
- UV long sleeve shirt
- UV short sleeve shirt
- Lightweight Tactical pants (convertible to shorts)
- (2) pair underwear
- (1) pair boxers
- (1) pair wool socks
- Camo swim trunks
- (2) Mosquito head nets
- Wool beanie cap
- Gloves

First aid kit:
- Folding scissors
- Cold compress
- Foot warmers
- Toe warmers
- Antiseptic towelettes
- Bandage tape
- Numerous bandages
- Moleskin blister medic
- Sting relief
- Bug repellent wipes
- Poison oak/ivy wipes
- Aspirin
- Acetaminophen
- Ibuprofen
- Antacid
- Lip balm
- Neosporin
- Burn cream
- 5 large safety pins
- 3 small safety pins
- Sawyer snake bite kit

Lighting kit:
- Good headlamp (3x aaa)
- Backup headlamp (watch battery)
- (6) AAA batteries
- (2) disposable neon light sticks
- (2) Mini flashlights

Food/Cooking/Kitchen Kit:
- JetBoil MiniMo stove
- JetBoil fuel 100g canister
- JetBoil steel pot support
- Spoon fork
- Mini spatula
- (6) Mtn. House meals
- (4) Black Tea bags
- (8) VIA instant coffee packets
- Sawyer mini water filter
- Sawyer 16oz water pouch
- 1/2 sponge
- Small Camp Suds soap
- Compressed towels 10 pack

Fire kit:
- (2) BIC lighters
- (8) WetFire Tender
- (20) cotton balls
- (1) tube Vaseline
- (2) packs waterproof matches
- (1) Butane camp / long lighter
- UST StrikeForce flint tool
- Big ball of lint

Fishing kit:
- 10-lb fluorocarbon leader (30yds)
- 15-lb braided line (100yds)
- (10) size 12 hooks
- (10) size 8 hooks
- (10) size 2/0 worm hooks
- (5) size 1 Owner J hooks
- (5) size 2 Owner J hooks
- (3) medium treble hooks
- (6) small swivels
- (2) 1/2oz egg weights
- (1) 1oz egg weight
- (15) split shot weights 2 sizes
- (10) Senko Worms

Toiletries:
- Advil
- Benadryl
- Anti diarrhea meds
- Toothbrush
- Mini Toothpaste
- Mini bar soap
- Badger bug spray (add another)
- Small sunblock
- Small Deodorant
- Wet wipes (for cleaning or TP)

WATER: water will be minimal needed to get me to BOL (no BOV needed). BOL is very close by and loaded with water. I'll grab a couple 16.9oz Dasani's on my way out the door and hit the road.

Considerations / Additions to my current hiking/camping setup to make it "BOB" compliant:

BUY:
+ NOAA battery+solar+crank radio
+ CAT Tourniquet
+ Live fire
+ Nemo Tensor 25R (or) Insulated Camp Pad $132-$135 / 19oz
+ Spray Benadryl
+ Superglue
+ Steri strips 3M
+ (2) fold flat cups
+ 1 liter sawyer water pouch
+ Another Sawyer mini set (?)

ADD (already have):
+ Cash
+ GPS
+ Water purification tabs (or) life-straw (for redundancy)
+ USB thumb drive (encrypted) w/ doc copies
+ Half roll toilet paper
+ Sharpie
+ AO Map copy
+ Black pepper packets
+ Honey + PB packets

Attachment Attached File


Attachment Attached File


ETA: FWIW, I know hiking packs aren't nearly tacticool enough for some, but holy shit they make rucking a heavy load a lot easier if you find one with a great padded waist belt and good shoulder straps. Go try on an Osprey 70L pack that costs $350 @ REI and have them load it up with 30-50lbs and you will feel the difference between that and all these heavy ass tacticoool bags like Blackhawk and the Rush 72 from 5.11. Don't get me wrong, they both make great bags, but not for toting 30+ lbs of gear in a 72hr bag. I only bring this up because when I was looking for a large capacity hiking bag that had great padded belts/straps - I couldn't find a quality one for anywhere under $150. Most are $200-$300 or more. But this Jansport I use for hiking normally goes for $119, - wife said she saw the 70L's on sale @ Academy for $90 yesterday. Worth exploring for those looking for large capacity along with comfort.
Link Posted: 8/13/2017 6:13:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/13/2017 6:16:29 AM EDT by protus]
Kodiak-
Dump the hammer,pliers,boxers,cHange tarp to siltarp.
Dump survival card.
Dump spatula- switch to alloy or TI spork.
Dressing kit- just add extra gloves. It's not needed.
Machete is only 10 inches- dump it. You have the saw. Or get a bigger machete or cane cutter.


What do you plan to hammer?
Link Posted: 8/13/2017 7:48:26 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By protus:
Kodiak-
Dump the hammer,pliers,boxers,cHange tarp to siltarp.
Dump survival card.
Dump spatula- switch to alloy or TI spork.
Dressing kit- just add extra gloves. It's not needed.
Machete is only 10 inches- dump it. You have the saw. Or get a bigger machete or cane cutter.

What do you plan to hammer?
View Quote
Tarp = planning on switching to this Tyvek as soon as I order a grommit kit. Will save me between 6-8oz: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TT7PIO8

Boxers = sleep in my boxers, keep
Survival card = agree, dumped
Spatula = is plastic small camp spatula and weighs .4oz, keep
Field Dressing kit = will weigh today, if over 1oz, dump and keep gloves only
Micro toolset and nails = TBD, will weigh today, and determine. May photo it for you, it's very small and I'm guessing negligible. Point of toolkit is repair and build.
Pliers = I fish a lot, 1 pair good (light) pliers is worth way more than a multi tool.

Machete = as the single heaviest thing on your list to dump, I couldn't agree more. It's heavy. But with all the rain we've had in FL this year, no way you are setting out on foot in the woods without a machete. Unless you have a weed whacker and a chainsaw
Link Posted: 8/13/2017 1:52:38 PM EDT
My property....

Carry multi tool..drop the pliers.Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 8/13/2017 2:03:47 PM EDT
What part of FL you in Protus? I'm in Central FL

I'll post a pic of my AO later, going out for a hike in a bit.
Link Posted: 8/13/2017 7:11:42 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KodiakZach:
What part of FL you in Protus? I'm in Central FL

I'll post a pic of my AO later, going out for a hike in a bit.
View Quote
The big no AT&T coverage zone...

Where I went this AM.

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 8/13/2017 7:35:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2017 5:02:32 PM EDT by KodiakZach]
First three miles of entering my AO look like this:

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 8/14/2017 4:25:07 PM EDT
ADD:

2x pairs socks.
Link Posted: 9/14/2017 9:50:49 PM EDT
Bug out bags.... this is actually a much larger topic than people think.
Just to let you guys know where I am coming from, I been camping and tramping for over 30 years.
This is both civilian and military experience. I've been everywhere from artic conditions to the jungles of south east Asia.
What I have learnt is that what goes into a bug out bag is dependant on two things
1: Location
2: Experience

Your location will have a much bigger influence on what goes into your bag than what a lot of people will give credit for.
The same for experience, my mate (buddy) and I have the same amount of field experience, but we pack our packs differently
and carry differing items.
I wont tell people what they should have in their BOB as their locations and experiences are vastly different to mine.
Link Posted: 12/14/2017 10:38:22 PM EDT
bump
Link Posted: 12/15/2017 10:41:43 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By unstabl:
bump
View Quote
Glad you bumped this. Mancub and I are headed to a remote lake for the weekend. It's only a 6 mile hike, but it will be pretty cold, so we get to do some cold weather testing of gear.

I may try to get a gear inventory and post pics when we get back.
Link Posted: 12/18/2017 10:38:45 AM EDT
One of the things we tested this weekend is this.

Very impressed. For it's cost and weight, I'd say it's a great alternative to other small stoves out there. You get enough burn time to boil 20+ oz of water and maybe heat up a cup of coffee with each fuel block.
Link Posted: 12/18/2017 12:23:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bcauz3y:
One of the things we tested this weekend is this.

Very impressed. For it's cost and weight, I'd say it's a great alternative to other small stoves out there. You get enough burn time to boil 20+ oz of water and maybe heat up a cup of coffee with each fuel block.
View Quote
And per the description, it's "Unisex".  
Link Posted: 10/10/2018 3:39:23 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Alien:
Gerber Suspension multitool (need to get a Leatherman or better Gerber model)
View Quote
@Alien
Why do you think the Gerbel Suspension isn't sufficient? Thanks.
Link Posted: 1/26/2019 10:14:24 AM EDT
i've posted this before, but remember (for those packing them)

CLIFF BARS WILL MOLD if not rotated out & used.

when i lived in NoCal there was a used outdoor equipment store across the
street from REI that sold them for dirt cheap; guy told me why. That's when
the factory for them was nearby.

there's other energy bars that last longer, taste as good & are priced similar
that will store longer, although i always check my all-year-round "packed" bags
at least every 6 months to rotate out batteries & other time change components.
Link Posted: 2/12/2019 12:04:50 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By HankZudd:
i've posted this before, but remember (for those packing them)

CLIFF BARS WILL MOLD if not rotated out & used.

when i lived in NoCal there was a used outdoor equipment store across the
street from REI that sold them for dirt cheap; guy told me why. That's when
the factory for them was nearby.

there's other energy bars that last longer, taste as good & are priced similar
that will store longer, although i always check my all-year-round "packed" bags
at least every 6 months to rotate out batteries & other time change components.
View Quote
Dunno bout mold but they get rock hard after 3 years.....
Link Posted: 4/29/2019 1:17:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2019 1:24:15 PM EDT by tacdog34]
Nice setup. Look at running a Hill People Gear Kit Bag for your carry firearm when carrying the pack. That's what I use. Keep a G17 with X300 and one or two extra mags, plus immediate action gear (flashlight, lighter, TQ, trauma kit).

Concerning the pad, I would ditch it and go to an inflateable. Takes up less space in the pack.

I can tell you've been backpacking and have thought your equipment out. Check out Mystery Ranch Coulee 40 (2500 cu). It's similar to the military MR packs & the Arcteryx Khard system (both which are used by SOCOM personnel). Solid.
Link Posted: 4/30/2019 9:59:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/30/2019 10:03:08 AM EDT by thederrick106]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tacdog34:
Nice setup. Look at running a Hill People Gear Kit Bag for your carry firearm when carrying the pack. That's what I use. Keep a G17 with X300 and one or two extra mags, plus immediate action gear (flashlight, lighter, TQ, trauma kit).

Concerning the pad, I would ditch it and go to an inflateable. Takes up less space in the pack.

I can tell you've been backpacking and have thought your equipment out. Check out Mystery Ranch Coulee 40 (2500 cu). It's similar to the military MR packs & the Arcteryx Khard system (both which are used by SOCOM personnel). Solid.
View Quote
There are a few of us that run the HPG kit bag w/ our packs.  I do, and I know Rock does...  Not sure what other long time forum guys use them...  I like carrying mine without a pistol, just as a small EDC hiking kit.  I also use it for riding motorcycle/ dual sport, ATV, and snowmobiling.

With that said my "bob" has been completely dismantled for over a year.  I always have a GHB, and gear ready to go but my longer distance on foot BOB needs to be rebuilt.  When I get around to rebuilding it I am going with the small, light, fast, get out of dodge mentality, not the live in the woods one.  I already live in the woods somewhat.

Cloths & comfort:
-A single change of cloths w/ several pairs of merino wool socks.
-Spare/ old leather belt.
-Spare footwear most likely sandals.
-Work gloves.
-Warm hat + ball cap.
-Small cheapo fleece blanket.
-Pillow case.
-Sleeping bag.

Shelter & utility:
-Single grabber/ mylar tarp. OD Green. (can double as shelter/ cover and/or a bedding base.
-Plenty of paracord.
-Card wrapped with various tape/ duct/ electrical.
-Small very basic sewing kit.
-Glock field knife. (strapped on the outside.)
-Mora 511.
-Leatherman Wave.
-Bacho folding saw.
-Bic lighter in exotac case.
-Lifeboat style matches.
-Average size ferro rod.
-Headlamp w/ spare batteries + a few small cheap keychain style LED flashlights.
-AM-FM-NOAA basic radio w/ batteries.
-Very small FAK w/ full size Israeli bandage.
-Tooth brush, tooth paste, small dental floss, small liquid dish soap.

Food & H2O:
-Snacks, energy bars, peanut butter & crackers/ food for on the go.
-A few MRE as space allows.
-Nalgene + nesting cup. (empty)
-1 Bottle of Gatorade or Powerade. (full)
-2% Iodine tincture.
No need to carry more than a single pick me up engeryish drink.  We have water everywhere.
-Sawyer mini. (brand new)
-Life straw on the outside of the pack.
Cant decide on the above two.

Next to the pack easy to toss in or on a vehicle:
-CS special forces shovel.  (I actually use this a lot when camping or on hunting trips.  I would probably pick this pre big knife or machete.)
-Wool blanket (nice to use if sitting around a fire.)
-Tent.
-Axe.
-Choice of gun+ammo.

That list describes my grab and go back, no time to spare.  If I have 10 minutes I can easily load up a second pack with more comprehensive survival gear, clothing etc.  I don't keep that pack loaded up because I use my stuff a lot while camping, on hunting trips etc.  Its organized in my man cave and easy to access.
Link Posted: 1/26/2020 5:47:38 AM EDT
do not forget salt... the body needs salt!
and maybe multi vitamin with C and more..
some way to filter water...
and condoms for the AR!
water in the barrel if you are out hunting.

and all the other stuff mentioned!!
plus a good medical kit.
Link Posted: 1/26/2020 1:38:17 PM EDT
WOW! There are some great looking setups on here. This gives me a reason to revisit my current setup to rethink some of the items I have packed and some that I have left out. Thanks all...
Link Posted: 10/12/2020 5:54:02 PM EDT
My sister suggested I look into a BOB (Hurricane Kit) for my niece. She is 22, living on the Gulf coast in her first place on her own. I've put together a list, but at $400 plus it is getting a little pricy. Anything in here that doesn't need to be? Anything missing that really should be here? Any suggestions for substitutes for some of it?


Link Posted: 10/22/2020 2:38:40 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PoopdeckPappy:
My sister suggested I look into a BOB (Hurricane Kit) for my niece. She is 22, living on the Gulf coast in her first place on her own. I've put together a list, but at $400 plus it is getting a little pricy. Anything in here that doesn't need to be? Anything missing that really should be here? Any suggestions for substitutes for some of it?

https://i.imgur.com/UeR8Sfx.png
View Quote


you could probably cut out things like Compass, Pot/Stove, things like that. If she is evacuating because of a hurricane, she is likely going to find shelter that has those things already.
Link Posted: 10/25/2020 10:38:13 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Hott_Seeds:


you could probably cut out things like Compass, Pot/Stove, things like that. If she is evacuating because of a hurricane, she is likely going to find shelter that has those things already.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Hott_Seeds:
Originally Posted By PoopdeckPappy:
My sister suggested I look into a BOB (Hurricane Kit) for my niece. She is 22, living on the Gulf coast in her first place on her own. I've put together a list, but at $400 plus it is getting a little pricy. Anything in here that doesn't need to be? Anything missing that really should be here? Any suggestions for substitutes for some of it?

https://i.imgur.com/UeR8Sfx.png


you could probably cut out things like Compass, Pot/Stove, things like that. If she is evacuating because of a hurricane, she is likely going to find shelter that has those things already.


Agree.  Get rid of the esbit stove, that Stanley set, special spork...  

A Nalgene, nesting cup and regular spoon would not only suffice but be better IMHO.

Don't buy special branded camping TP, just save half a roll and put it in a ziplock.

Not sure what the pathwater thing is, already have a nalgene.  I would add a Sawyer Mini and call it good, or pack of tablets.

$30 thrunite?  I would go for an off the shelf head lamp like one of the rayovac indestructible.  I have a few around the house that have been used hard for years and they hold up and work well.
https://www.amazon.com/Rayovac-Virtually-Indestructible-Flashlight-Headlight/dp/B004Y6DMG0

Get rid of the compass and map.  Print maps of the AO and download them to phone.  Unless she knows how to use that compass no point.

20$ for a note pad and pen?  Get a regular note pad and put it in a ziplock bag.

Only give a new Mora to someone who has experience with a knife or acknowledges that its razor sharp and wont just cut you but slice to the bone in less than a second.  I am a huge fan of Moras and have many but if I was equipping a family member who wasn't ever outdoor oriented, and didn't need to process game or play bushcraft I would lean towards a budget friendly multi-tool in an evac type situation. Maybe a very basic gerber or leatherman?

I am not sure what that wool blanket is, but also consider a basic harbor freight wool blanket.

I would also let her pick a pack, or just use an old school bag that you have laying around?

Not trying to be critical just answering your call to save $!  
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