Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
User Panel

Page / 4
Link Posted: 1/14/2018 9:33:28 PM EST
[#1]
Ups finally delivered the hammock. Having a day off I went ahead and strung it up. The set up was fast and easy. It didnt take long to get comfy and before I knew it I had napped 3 hours.
First impressions.
No more tents for me.It was crazy comfortable. With the way the wind rocked the hammock it felt similiar to floating in water.
It was about 50° and sunny and I could see where you would want an underquilt in cooler weather.
All in all Im pleased. When I get the chance Ill go overnight in it.
Eta. For some reason Im having trouble posting a pic
fnh
Link Posted: 1/14/2018 9:44:29 PM EST
[#2]
I've got a Hennesy; only used it a few times for napping during our mid-day shutdown on the LZ.  That wind starts blowing and the helicopters land.

It has an integrated bug fly and a separate rain fly.
Link Posted: 1/15/2018 2:06:02 AM EST
[#3]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Ups finally delivered the hammock. Having a day off I went ahead and strung it up. The set up was fast and easy. It didnt take long to get comfy and before I knew it I had napped 3 hours.
First impressions.
No more tents for me.It was crazy comfortable. With the way the wind rocked the hammock it felt similiar to floating in water.
It was about 50 and sunny and I could see where you would want an underquilt in cooler weather.
All in all Im pleased. When I get the chance Ill go overnight in it.
Eta. For some reason Im having trouble posting a pic
View Quote
It may not be quite as comfortable as having an under quilt, but you could use a sleeping pad in most 10-11 foot hammocks. If you don't have an insulated sleeping pad already, just use a second sleeping bag zipped closed under you for insulation.

For more info, Google "hammock forum".
Link Posted: 1/15/2018 10:30:23 PM EST
[#4]
The downside to a pad is that they slip and slide. If you're going to go this route I highly recommend a double layer with a sleeve. The pad slides in the sleeve stays put.
Link Posted: 1/28/2018 2:50:13 AM EST
[#5]
I discovered hammock camping last summer and love it. took no time to get used to it.
Link Posted: 2/10/2018 6:50:57 PM EST
[#6]
I've got a Kammok Roo I bought before hanging out on Hammock Forums. It's...Ok, but I plan on moving up to a Dutch Chameleon soon.
As for quilts, I got a set of Loco Libre Super Saver 20 deg quilts that are very, very comfy.

Link Posted: 2/15/2018 4:37:29 PM EST
[#7]
I've been slowly upgrading my hammock camping gear as the time has gone on. Went from a sleeping bag top and a pad bottom to a HG Burrow 30 Econ TQ and a Jarbridge UQ. Next step is to upgrade my Tarp and get a bit lighter. I've found Paria outdoors has a nice lightweight tarp i'm going to try. My old Hennessey Hex Tarp is just way too heavy. The Paria tarp is supposed to be 11 oz lighter(the entire setup is 16 oz) at only cost $80. While it's not cuben tarp light, it's not cuben tarp pricey either. After that, i'm going to grab a netted Dutchware hammock, as I found i like the 11ft hammocks better than the shorter Skeeter Beeter Pro.
Link Posted: 2/15/2018 8:10:35 PM EST
[#8]
Arf:

FO or NO FO:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072BXHBTF/ref=sspa_mw_detail_4?psc=1

I'm completely new to hammocking. Going in May. Single or double? I'm sleeping alone that night. Can a double actually support two people?
Link Posted: 2/15/2018 9:37:31 PM EST
[#9]
It says it supports 600# but I can't imagine trying to share a hammock.

Looks decent enough if a little short. I prefer a 11' hammock but I'm on the taller end. I'd be curious what the straps are made of. Nylon stretches and you'll end up on the ground. Polypro doesn't.

I like wide and long so that's what I'd go for. Don't forget an underquilt so you don't freeze your ass off.
Link Posted: 2/15/2018 9:46:02 PM EST
[#10]
I quite like my XLC, but I need to get a tarp. It’s hard for me to sleep outside of near total darkness, which presents a problem when the moon is out and it’s bright as blazes through the bug net. It’s stinkin’ comfortable and easy to pack though, almost makes me regret buying a tent before I got it.

Regarding double hammocks, they can indeed support the weight, but that doesn’t mean you’ll be comfortable sleeping that close to someone all night. I take my tent when my girlfriend and I go, but the hammock when I’m with a buddy.
Link Posted: 2/16/2018 8:12:56 AM EST
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Arf:

FO or NO FO:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072BXHBTF/ref=sspa_mw_detail_4?psc=1

I'm completely new to hammocking. Going in May. Single or double? I'm sleeping alone that night. Can a double actually support two people?
View Quote
That price is almost disposable, so I am thinking fo for it.

How tall are you? I am 6' and always look for longer hammocks, that just-under 10' may be a problem. Nice thing about May camping (at least in Jersey) is the that you don:to need a bug net.
Link Posted: 2/16/2018 10:25:38 AM EST
[#12]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

That price is almost disposable, so I am thinking fo for it.

How tall are you? I am 6' and always look for longer hammocks, that just-under 10' may be a problem. Nice thing about May camping (at least in Jersey) is the that you don:to need a bug net.
View Quote
6' as well, camping on PA/NJ border. Single or double?
Link Posted: 2/16/2018 10:59:56 AM EST
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

6' as well, camping on PA/NJ border. Single or double?
View Quote
For an extra $3, i'd go with the double. The reason being that the wider the hammock, the flatter the lay you can get. You actually sleep on an diagonal like this:



So that way, you have more material where your feet/head will be(which helps when you are above 6 ft. You might need to find a longer hammock in the future, but i would think you will probably be ok with the wide model. And no, i wouldn't try to sleep two people in a hammock. Not overnight at least. For an afternoon nap or something? Maybe. Just getting in and out for bathroom trips at 3am would be a mess.
Link Posted: 2/16/2018 2:44:52 PM EST
[#14]
Looks like I'm buying a hammock then. Now if my friends actually come through on the canoe trip...
Link Posted: 2/18/2018 4:01:27 PM EST
[#15]
I've gotten a couple more afternoon hammock naps under my belt. Because of my height I started having an issue of knee hyper extension. It just made my knees ache. I solved most of it with adjusting strap heights and tension on the hammock. I also got a blowup camping pillow from amazon and I put it up under my knees. That did the trick. I've been looking at quilts but I think I'll spend a few nights in it first before I lay out the cash for those. So far so good.
Link Posted: 2/18/2018 4:01:40 PM EST
[#16]
Edited for the Ol double taparooni.
Link Posted: 3/4/2018 10:05:49 AM EST
[#17]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

For an extra $3, i'd go with the double. The reason being that the wider the hammock, the flatter the lay you can get. You actually sleep on an diagonal like this:

https://i0.wp.com/scoutingmagazine.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/HammockSleepDiagonal.jpg?ssl=1

So that way, you have more material where your feet/head will be(which helps when you are above 6 ft. You might need to find a longer hammock in the future, but i would think you will probably be ok with the wide model. And no, i wouldn't try to sleep two people in a hammock. Not overnight at least. For an afternoon nap or something? Maybe. Just getting in and out for bathroom trips at 3am would be a mess.
View Quote
I'm 5'4 and sleep in a hennessey Safari deluxe. Its like an apartment.
I have a friend who is like 5'11 and 300#, who sleeps in a "mid size" hammock with a bug net, he looks like a sausage.

Deffinitely go with the biggest model you can swing.
Link Posted: 3/5/2018 2:42:09 PM EST
[#18]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I'm 5'4 and sleep in a hennessey Safari deluxe. Its like an apartment.
I have a friend who is like 5'11 and 300#, who sleeps in a "mid size" hammock with a bug net, he looks like a sausage.

Deffinitely go with the biggest model you can swing.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:

For an extra $3, i'd go with the double. The reason being that the wider the hammock, the flatter the lay you can get. You actually sleep on an diagonal like this:

https://i0.wp.com/scoutingmagazine.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/HammockSleepDiagonal.jpg?ssl=1

So that way, you have more material where your feet/head will be(which helps when you are above 6 ft. You might need to find a longer hammock in the future, but i would think you will probably be ok with the wide model. And no, i wouldn't try to sleep two people in a hammock. Not overnight at least. For an afternoon nap or something? Maybe. Just getting in and out for bathroom trips at 3am would be a mess.
I'm 5'4 and sleep in a hennessey Safari deluxe. Its like an apartment.
I have a friend who is like 5'11 and 300#, who sleeps in a "mid size" hammock with a bug net, he looks like a sausage.

Deffinitely go with the biggest model you can swing.
I'm 5'7" and I have an 11 and 10 foot Hennessy Hammocks.  I kind of like the shorter one better.  That foot side zipper is awful far away once I'm in the 11 footer.  I did run a piece of glow in the dark paracord from the zipper to the ridge line to help, but I've still slept better in the short one.
Link Posted: 3/5/2018 9:27:30 PM EST
[#19]
I rode my scooter up to Utah and slept in the snow in my hammock. Toasty warm all night.
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 7:28:19 AM EST
[#20]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I'm 5'7" and I have an 11 and 10 foot Hennessy Hammocks.  I kind of like the shorter one better.  That foot side zipper is awful far away once I'm in the 11 footer.  I did run a piece of glow in the dark paracord from the zipper to the ridge line to help, but I've still slept better in the short one.
View Quote
Mine is a bottom entry. I have a paranoia of broken zippers.
I've never seen a hendo side zip in person, how confident are you in the zipper? The side zips I have tested seemed like there is a lot of pressure on the zipper when entering and exiting.
Whats your feeling on them if you dont mind?
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 9:07:03 AM EST
[#21]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Mine is a bottom entry. I have a paranoia of broken zippers.
I've never seen a hendo side zip in person, how confident are you in the zipper? The side zips I have tested seemed like there is a lot of pressure on the zipper when entering and exiting.
Whats your feeling on them if you dont mind?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:

I'm 5'7" and I have an 11 and 10 foot Hennessy Hammocks.  I kind of like the shorter one better.  That foot side zipper is awful far away once I'm in the 11 footer.  I did run a piece of glow in the dark paracord from the zipper to the ridge line to help, but I've still slept better in the short one.
Mine is a bottom entry. I have a paranoia of broken zippers.
I've never seen a hendo side zip in person, how confident are you in the zipper? The side zips I have tested seemed like there is a lot of pressure on the zipper when entering and exiting.
Whats your feeling on them if you dont mind?
Gee thanks!  A new something to worry about I'd never thought of!
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 9:44:37 AM EST
[#22]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Mine is a bottom entry. I have a paranoia of broken zippers.
I've never seen a hendo side zip in person, how confident are you in the zipper? The side zips I have tested seemed like there is a lot of pressure on the zipper when entering and exiting.
Whats your feeling on them if you dont mind?
View Quote
I haven't had a problem with the zip model, other than catching the material while closing it.  They'll stop before it tears the material.  I do like my bottom entry better, until it gets cold out.  Using pads and under quilts can be a pain with the bottom entry(BE).  You do have the option to add zippers to your BE model.   2qzqhammockhanger.com does the zipper add on, and a few other things.  Keep in mind that you can always add a zipper to BE, but you can't add BE to a zip model.  I will be sending mine in for the zip mod for sure.

Here's how this past weekend went.
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 9:54:29 AM EST
[#23]
[misfire]
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 9:55:37 AM EST
[#24]
FYI, Outdoor Vitals just released a 15° synthetic top quit that with a coupon code ships for under a bill.

Not affiliated, hell I won't even provide you with a link :-)

This is my first purchase from them, will report back results.
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 10:00:10 AM EST
[#25]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

For an extra $3, i'd go with the double. The reason being that the wider the hammock, the flatter the lay you can get. You actually sleep on an diagonal like this:

https://i0.wp.com/scoutingmagazine.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/HammockSleepDiagonal.jpg?ssl=1

So that way, you have more material where your feet/head will be(which helps when you are above 6 ft. You might need to find a longer hammock in the future, but i would think you will probably be ok with the wide model. And no, i wouldn't try to sleep two people in a hammock. Not overnight at least. For an afternoon nap or something? Maybe. Just getting in and out for bathroom trips at 3am would be a mess.
View Quote
While other people seem to be successful with that I can't do it in cold weather.  No matter how much I fiddle-fuck trying to fit underquilts to the asym-lay hammocks I end up awake at 3 or 4AM with my shoulder and feet completely frozen and the rest of me cold.  The quilt always pops off my shoulder and feet and then leaves gaps where the heat all escapes.  I have a WBBB and I love the comfort for afternoon sleeping, but I just can't stay warm without using a pad in that thing.

I ended up back in my Clark with Z-Liner.  What I really want is a down underquilt made like the Z-Liner so that it Velcro's to the edges and stays put better than the stupid bungee cord suspension systems do.  Nobody makes it and I can't sew for shit.
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 10:02:16 AM EST
[#26]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
FYI, Outdoor Vitals just released a 15° synthetic top quit that with a coupon code ships for under a bill.

Not affiliated, hell I won't even provide you with a link :-)

This is my first purchase from them, will report back results.
View Quote
I won't ever need something that low.    Have you thought of making your own gear?  I've seen some really badass DIY gear on the hammockforums.
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 10:12:00 AM EST
[#27]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

While other people seem to be successful with that I can't do it in cold weather.  No matter how much I fiddle-fuck trying to fit underquilts to the asym-lay hammocks I end up awake at 3 or 4AM with my shoulder and feet completely frozen and the rest of me cold.  The quilt always pops off my shoulder and feet and then leaves gaps where the heat all escapes.  I have a WBBB and I love the comfort for afternoon sleeping, but I just can't stay warm without using a pad in that thing.

I ended up back in my Clark with Z-Liner.  What I really want is a down underquilt made like the Z-Liner so that it Velcro's to the edges and stays put better than the stupid bungee cord suspension systems do.  Nobody makes it and I can't sew for shit.
View Quote
Wouldn't the hammock have to come with the soft side of the velcro sewn in?
While it's not an UQ, I can say that the Hennessy Super Shelter is set up so that the undercover and underpad don't move a lot if at all.  I ended up sleeping on the net of the hammock at some point while the SS was still perfectly aligned.
My Bear Taco:
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 12:20:49 PM EST
[#28]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I won't ever need something that low.    Have you thought of making your own gear?  I've seen some really badass DIY gear on the hammockforums.
View Quote
Once upon a time I signed up at Lightfighter strictly for their arts & crafts section, but being told I needed to spend north of $700 on a used sewing machine put a damper on those activities.

Honestly at the price points for gear these days I don't know that there is much benefit to roll-your-own, at least at my level of activity and amount of free time. $150 got me an R 5.1 sleeping pad at REI, coupled with the "cheep" ENO under quilt and this top quilt I expect to be good at most any temperature I would venture out in.
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 1:59:57 PM EST
[#29]
got a couple of IMs so I will just share the details here.

The quilt is on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B078X19156/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1520362360&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=topquilt&dpPl=1&dpID=510aPi-h3%2BL&ref=plSrch

(I am leaving cold because the ARF referrer fuckery tends to break Amazon links for me).

I used the coupon code TQS15OFF for a 35% discount. If that stopped working try LOFTTEK5 for a 25% discount.

HTH,
WTF
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 2:15:42 PM EST
[#30]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Wouldn't the hammock have to come with the soft side of the velcro sewn in?
While it's not an UQ, I can say that the Hennessy Super Shelter is set up so that the undercover and underpad don't move a lot if at all.  I ended up sleeping on the net of the hammock at some point while the SS was still perfectly aligned.
My Bear Taco:
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/922/800tS5.jpg
View Quote
Indeed.  The Clark NX270 has velcro sewn along the edges for that purpose.  Earlier versions of that hammock did not.   It's the same with the Z-Liner.  I can move all night and turn head over heels and it will be exactly where it needs to be.  Problem is for me the Z-Liner is only good down to about 35 (others claim colder) degrees or so before cold-butt syndrome begins to set in and it's a bulky synthetic blanket.  A 0 or 10 degree down version would a perfect product.
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 2:21:56 PM EST
[#31]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
got a couple of IMs so I will just share the details here.

The quilt is on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B078X19156/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1520362360&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=topquilt&dpPl=1&dpID=510aPi-h3%2BL&ref=plSrch

(I am leaving cold because the ARF referrer fuckery tends to break Amazon links for me).

I used the coupon code TQS15OFF for a 35% discount. If that stopped working try LOFTTEK5 for a 25% discount.

HTH,
WTF
View Quote
Is 2lbs 11 oz. Good or bad on weight as compared to other top quilts? Im new to this and was just curious what everybody thought?
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 2:29:09 PM EST
[#32]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Is 2lbs 11 oz. Good or bad on weight as compared to other top quilts? Im new to this and was just curious what everybody thought?
View Quote
That's pretty decent.  Not phenomenal but good, probably really just represents the loss of the hood, zippers, and extra back material.

However with the discount code the damn thing is a complete steal.  If I didn't already have 2 quilts plus a down bag, I'd have broken the sound barrier grabbing that.
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 3:07:34 PM EST
[#33]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

That's pretty decent.  Not phenomenal but good, probably really just represents the loss of the hood, zippers, and extra back material.

However with the discount code the damn thing is a complete steal.  If I didn't already have 2 quilts plus a down bag, I'd have broken the sound barrier grabbing that.
View Quote
Well. I fo'd on it. Just for everyone's info. Its about 20oz heavier. Than quilts like Loco libre, HG incubator, and EE's top quilt. But all those are $250 to $350 TQ. So Ill just work out more and save me some money.lol Why Tan Fox thanks for posting the deal.
Link Posted: 3/6/2018 6:33:38 PM EST
[#34]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Well. I fo'd on it. Just for everyone's info. Its about 20oz heavier. Than quilts like Loco libre, HG incubator, and EE's top quilt. But all those are $250 to $350 TQ. So Ill just work out more and save me some money.lol Why Tan Fox thanks for posting the deal.
View Quote
You are welcome. I ran into this company through a YouTube ad when I was watching hammocking videos. This is my first purchase from them, hopefully they don't pull a BoTach
Link Posted: 3/12/2018 12:35:59 AM EST
[#35]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Looks like I'm buying a hammock then. Now if my friends actually come through on the canoe trip...
View Quote
You will want to experiment with set ups way before you depend on a good night's sleep in a hammock. The "good" stuff can be rather expensive, but you can ease into it inexpensively.

My first was a $25 cheapo from Academy. I could porch nap in it better than the wife's Eno that she loved. (I hated the Eno). Tarp was a blue Walmart 10x12. Underquilts are pricey, but well worth the expense. I was able to start with a pad. It was a green foam pad. It, with a 2x4 foot rectangle of Reflectix insulation and a top quilt kept me warm into the low 40's. My top quilt is just a down mummy bag flipped over and used as a TQ.  Add a real TQ and a homemade fleece TC liner and I was comfy to the low 20's.

An adjustable "structural" ridgeline was one of the best investments I made.  Adjust it to get the perfect amount of  sag in the hammock, then lock it down.  That one thing gained me the most sleep (beside good insulation)

My latest evolution in hammocking is an 11' Dutchware hammock, whoopies/treehuggers/tarp build by a freind from Hammock Forums (Squidbilly). Insulation is the already mentioned inverted down bag, the homemade fleece TC liner (with extra insulated footbox). Bottom insulation is either my old army pad or an underquilt the wife made. Note: if I use the army pad, i lay a small cotton camp towel between me and the pad to soak any sweat that might accumulate there.
Link Posted: 3/12/2018 12:39:02 AM EST
[#36]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I've gotten a couple more afternoon hammock naps under my belt. Because of my height I started having an issue of knee hyper extension. It just made my knees ache. I solved most of it with adjusting strap heights and tension on the hammock. I also got a blowup camping pillow from amazon and I put it up under my knees. That did the trick. I've been looking at quilts but I think I'll spend a few nights in it first before I lay out the cash for those. So far so good.
View Quote
That was also my biggest sleep robber and was solved with a blow up pillow,  a structual ridge line set just right and diagonal lay in a longer hammock.
Link Posted: 3/12/2018 10:53:13 PM EST
[#37]
I received the Outdoor Vitals 15° top quilt. The delivery came in several days early. When I was unpacking everything I found a hand written note saying that they had complimentary upgraded my order to two day shipping. Nice. Everything looked nice and well made. I ordered the larger size. Im 6'4" and it is plenty big for me (I can pull it over my head). As mentioned before at this price point it's a bargain.

So with new quilt I thought what the hell It's time for my first overnight hang. I rigged an underquilt out of an old sleeping bag. I set up on the back porch without a tarp. I settled in to bed wearing a beanie,shorts and a tshirt.Except for the occasional draft from turning over or the beanie coming off of my ear. I was plenty warm( it got down to 37°).I slept solid until about 4am.After that the wind got up to about 15 mph and I could feel the bottom side of the hammock cooling down, but I never got cold. But in between the swaying of the hammock in the wind and the pack of coyotes howling in the distance I slept poorly from 4- 6am.

All in all I'm impressed with the Outdoor vitals top quilt.And I'm pleased I finally got the first overnight hang under my belt.

Edited to say. Right out of the box it took the quilt about 30 min to loft up. Also the footbox on the OV top quilt had plenty of room.
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 7:04:34 AM EST
[#38]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I received the Outdoor Vitals 15° top quilt. The delivery came in several days early. When I was unpacking everything I found a hand written note saying that they had complimentary upgraded my order to two day shipping. Nice. Everything looked nice and well made. I ordered the larger size. Im 6'4" and it is plenty big for me (I can pull it over my head). As mentioned before at this price point it's a bargain.

So with new quilt I thought what the hell It's time for my first overnight hang. I rigged an underquilt out of an old sleeping bag. I set up on the back porch without a tarp. I settled in to bed wearing a beanie,shorts and a tshirt.Except for the occasional draft from turning over or the beanie coming off of my ear. I was plenty warm( it got down to 37°).I slept solid until about 4am.After that the wind got up to about 15 mph and I could feel the bottom side of the hammock cooling down, but I never got cold. But in between the swaying of the hammock in the wind and the pack of coyotes howling in the distance I slept poorly from 4- 6am.

All in all I'm impressed with the Outdoor vitals top quilt.And I'm pleased I finally got the first overnight hang under my belt.
View Quote
Thank you for your review on it.  It's funny how coyotes will keep you awake once you hear them getting something.  I did 41° with the Hennessy Super Shelter and the patrol bag from an MSS.  I was cold on top, toasty on bottom.  I probably need this in my life.
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 7:28:13 AM EST
[#39]
If I’m honest, I always have a tough night the first night in a hammock unless I am physically exhausted.  It’s such a different mode of sleep that it’s tough to just plop down and go to bed.  Unless it’s afternoon.  For some reason I can’t stay awake in one in the afternoon.  Go figure.

A big help to me is just to take some sleep aid before bed the first night.  Then I sleep pretty soundly unless there is a major issue.

Another trick is to boil up some water and put it in a nalgene container.  Put that in a sock and put that inside with you between the legs.  It really helps keep the cold at bay overnight.
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 8:08:22 AM EST
[#40]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
That was also my biggest sleep robber and was solved with a blow up pillow,  a structual ridge line set just right and diagonal lay in a longer hammock.
View Quote
I have been looking into structural ridgelines but haven't set one up yet. My understanding is that it allows you to set and keep a constant "slack" in the hammock regardless of how tight or loose the suspension may be; is that right?

One of the things I like about using a wide & long camp pad is it helps me keep some form for a diagonal lay, and allows me to roll from back to side if I want. Conversely, I don’t get the point of the mummy pods as they force a straight lay and that seems to be uncomfortable for a night's sleep.
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 8:11:19 AM EST
[#41]
Regarding the OV top quilt, it has a ton of loft and is lighter and packs much smaller than the Coleman mummy bag I was draping over myself. I am excited to take it out this weekend, though I think the over-nights are only about 35°.
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 8:26:57 AM EST
[#42]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I have been looking into structural ridgelines but haven't set one up yet. My understanding is that it allows you to set and keep a constant "slack" in the hammock regardless of how tight or loose the suspension may be; is that right?

One of the things I like about using a wide & long camp pad is it helps me keep some form for a diagonal lay, and allows me to roll from back to side if I want. Conversely, I don’t get the point of the mummy pods as they force a straight lay and that seems to be uncomfortable for a night's sleep.
View Quote
Exactly.  It sets the length between the ends of the hammock so that a specific amount of sag is there no matter where the suspension lines are placed on the trees (within reason).  Keep in mind that closer the suspension lines get to horizontal the force on the ridge line and exerted on the tree goes up exponentially.

I setup a ridgeline on my Clark for this reason.  It's much easier to put up the hammock if I don't have to fuss with the suspension lines trying to get the sag just right.  It also opens a wider selection of trees since I don't have to reach 4' above my head if they are a little further apart than the ideal.
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 11:02:54 AM EST
[#43]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Exactly.  It sets the length between the ends of the hammock so that a specific amount of sag is there no matter where the suspension lines are placed on the trees (within reason).  Keep in mind that closer the suspension lines get to horizontal the force on the ridge line and exerted on the tree goes up exponentially.

I setup a ridgeline on my Clark for this reason.  It's much easier to put up the hammock if I don't have to fuss with the suspension lines trying to get the sag just right.  It also opens a wider selection of trees since I don't have to reach 4' above my head if they are a little further apart than the ideal.
View Quote
By intoducing the sag into the hammock does it help you lay flatter?
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 11:26:29 AM EST
[#44]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
By intoducing the sag into the hammock does it help you lay flatter?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:

Exactly.  It sets the length between the ends of the hammock so that a specific amount of sag is there no matter where the suspension lines are placed on the trees (within reason).  Keep in mind that closer the suspension lines get to horizontal the force on the ridge line and exerted on the tree goes up exponentially.

I setup a ridgeline on my Clark for this reason.  It's much easier to put up the hammock if I don't have to fuss with the suspension lines trying to get the sag just right.  It also opens a wider selection of trees since I don't have to reach 4' above my head if they are a little further apart than the ideal.
By intoducing the sag into the hammock does it help you lay flatter?
Yes. If it is pulled too tight, you can't get diagonal. Laying diagonally is how you get flat(ter).

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 12:36:42 PM EST
[#45]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

By intoducing the sag into the hammock does it help you lay flatter?
View Quote
In general yes.  For the Clark it’s not designed for a heavy asymmetrical lay.  You can do a slight diagonal lay in it but not like Black Bird.  However the whole thing just feels better at the proper sag angle.  It doesn’t squeeze in on your shoulders, the fabric isn’t as stressed and doesn’t push on your calves so much.  Also the zippers work correctly for the netting with the proper sag.
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 2:41:54 PM EST
[#46]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

In general yes.  For the Clark it’s not designed for a heavy asymmetrical lay.  You can do a slight diagonal lay in it but not like Black Bird.  However the whole thing just feels better at the proper sag angle.  It doesn’t squeeze in on your shoulders, the fabric isn’t as stressed and doesn’t push on your calves so much.  Also the zippers work correctly for the netting with the proper sag.  
View Quote
My whole family is in Hennessys for less than a Clark.  
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 3:52:13 PM EST
[#47]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

My whole family is in Hennessys for less than a Clark.  
View Quote
Yeah, I didn't like Hennesy, and I loved sleeping in the Warbonnet Blackbird but as mentioned I can't get insulation to stay put on it so I wake up in the wee hours freezing somewhere.  Clark works well for me and I stay warm and sleep well through the nights.  Thus that's what I keep using.  Got it when they had a sale going on, so it wasn't the painful current list price.

I also got a Tentsile with last years dividend from REI so it cost me $50 out of pocket.  I freaking LOVE that thing for car camping expeditions.  It's expensive too, but it's comfortable and fun to use.

Takes all kinds.
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 8:15:32 PM EST
[#48]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Yeah, I didn't like Hennesy, and I loved sleeping in the Warbonnet Blackbird but as mentioned I can't get insulation to stay put on it so I wake up in the wee hours freezing somewhere.  Clark works well for me and I stay warm and sleep well through the nights.  Thus that's what I keep using.  Got it when they had a sale going on, so it wasn't the painful current list price.

I also got a Tentsile with last years dividend from REI so it cost me $50 out of pocket.  I freaking LOVE that thing for car camping expeditions.  It's expensive too, but it's comfortable and fun to use.

Takes all kinds.
View Quote
I was just a little envious.
Link Posted: 3/13/2018 10:41:51 PM EST
[#49]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I was just a little envious.
View Quote
Nah don’t be.  If you found something that works good stick with it.  I had a Clark first and then got into a gear forum and had to have all these others so I sold it off and bought the Hennessy, then sold that and bought the Warbonnet, then Warbonnet XL.  Then I ended up back at the Clark.  My kid likes the Warbonnet XL though so that’s not a complete loss.  I gave the first Warbonnet to a good friend of mine as a birthday gift.  He still uses it.

Anyway.  A lot of money got tossed just to find I should have stuck with what was working for me.
Link Posted: 3/19/2018 10:36:50 AM EST
[#50]
Hammocked this past weekend.

Gear: Outer Limits single hammock, Bear Butt tarp & "atlas"-like straps, Outdoor Vitals 15° over quilt, ENO Ember2 under quilt, REI Flash pad

Overnight low: 12.7°

Details: I used an extra atlas strap (NHO brand) as a make shift structural ridgeline, which helped get a good sag despite the rather long distance between trees. It was my first time using a tarp and I wasn't sure how to best string it up; in the end I looped the quick adjusters through the grommets and tied to trees and tent pegs with a clove hitch. No precipitation expected but I rigged the tarp to break the wind. I slept in thin UA-knock offs from Costco, wool socks, and a cotton hooded sweatshirt... and I slept like a baby! Toasty (mostly) all night long.

Cons/changes: my ass cheaks got a little cold, the pad seemed to deflate a little and my butt definitely had the highest PSI of the lay, creating an uninsulated cold spot. I will try with more sag, more air in the pad, and double-wide hammock so I can get a better diagonal lay. I may also revert to (or maybe just double up) and use my foam pad (which is bulkier than and doesn't have the R value of the REI pad, but I won't have to worry about cold spots). "Shoulder wings" may have helped a little but rolling on my side solved the butt problem and got my shoulders warmer.

But those hiccups were minor and I have great confidence in my gear to make it comfortably through a very cold night.
Page / 4
Close Join Our Mail List to Stay Up To Date! Win a FREE Membership!

Sign up for the ARFCOM weekly newsletter and be entered to win a free ARFCOM membership. One new winner* is announced every week!

You will receive an email every Friday morning featuring the latest chatter from the hottest topics, breaking news surrounding legislation, as well as exclusive deals only available to ARFCOM email subscribers.


By signing up you agree to our User Agreement. *Must have a registered ARFCOM account to win.
Top Top