Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
User Panel

Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 9/7/2021 6:48:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2021 6:49:00 PM EDT by mm38]
I retired at the end of June.  I actually stayed about 3½ years longer than I had originally wanted to.

I'm wondering who else that are/were eligible to retire, but well under the "traditional" retirement age, have chosen to retire?  Did the silliness that started in 2020 contribute to the decision?


mm
Link Posted: 9/7/2021 8:17:28 PM EDT
Retirement is not an age, it's a number.  At least to be comfortable.  

Congrats on your success and I hope you have some great experiences coming up.  Don't worry about being free like that, lots of people doing remote work or retiring early, it's not as rare as it once was.  Besides you still have a job - managing a retirement fund with just one client.

I have a bit longer but will be out of here when I hit my number.  I know folks who really like their work and will stay longer just to have something to do, but that's not me.  We got a late start but some applied effort works wonders.

Link Posted: 9/7/2021 8:20:21 PM EDT
Retired at 60 with most excellent medical and a decent retirement income.  Civil service engineer with the USAF.
Link Posted: 9/7/2021 9:32:37 PM EDT
Although I could retire in fewer than 40 days, and my "number" is decent (it could always be better), age 50 just seems way too early to quit working, even though my ranch would certainly keep me occupied...
Link Posted: 9/8/2021 10:30:39 AM EDT
I'm late 50's. Work from home the past 10 years. Make really good money and like my job.
I get 7 weeks paid time off each year. I'm in no hurry to retire. But if I had to
I could quit working today. My youngest has a few more years to go in college
and my wife isn't eligible for retirement from her job for another 10 years.
Link Posted: 9/8/2021 11:01:48 AM EDT
Life is an eternal balance between time and money.

When you're young, you have lots of time and little money.

When you're older, you have more money, but time is the thing lacking.  By the end, you trade all your money for more time to extend your life.

At some point you have to transition between one phase and the other.  Do it too young, and you run of out money.  People say they can go back to work - but a long break between jobs, in the same field anyway, usually results in far lower pay than keeping on with the same job for longer.

Do it too old, and you work all your life, then get sick and croak without spending time doing what you like, unless you're in the small group of people who really likes what you do for a living, and would do the same thing as as hobby for free.

I'd err on the side of doing it too young, and having more time / less money.  There are plenty of things to do that don't cost a great deal, and the best things like having good times with family and friends don't cost that much to begin with.

Link Posted: 9/8/2021 11:20:16 AM EDT
My wife is 51, eligible to retire right now. The question for us is health insurance. Too young to be on the government dole. March will make 25 with the agency she's at now. She can keep her plan for her only as long as we pay for it. I run a small business, talked to my business insurance company last month. No way I can get enough employees to pay premiums to have a company insurance policy. I may actually have to start a second holding company to get a plan together. But it's all up in the air if she's actually going to jump ship or not.

Link Posted: 9/8/2021 11:20:30 AM EDT
I set a goal, decades ago, to retire at 55 with no dependence on Social Security. I've been with the same financial advisor for all those years and with his help, I got there - retired in early 2019 at 55.

I could have worked another 5 years, but the political crap at my job made me leave. Got tired of seeing good people pushed down or cast aside, while smooth-talking idiots got promoted into positions they neither earned nor deserved.

As soon as your finances are in order, pull the trigger. I've talked to other retirees who wished they'd retired sooner. I highly recommend the retired life
Link Posted: 9/8/2021 3:56:22 PM EDT
I am planning on retiring at the end of 2022.  I will be 51.  Almost dying last year changed my perspective on work, family and life.   We will evac Dallas to Bosque County.  I will probably do a little real estate and still consult for my former company.
Link Posted: 9/8/2021 3:58:56 PM EDT
My life goal was to retire "earl" compared to my peers. I quit working at 50 and we finally sold out when I was 55. It has been MARVELOUS. Far and away the best year of our lives. We're active and travel a lot. I'll be shooting a PRS match in a couple of weeks with my Son and the wife and I will just take off from the match site and go wherever she wants to go. I'm beginning to slow down a bit as I'll be 68 pretty soon. That doesn't mean I feel old it just means that I and only I set my speed for the day or the event or the whatever. I enjoy working in my shop and squiring the wife around. My tractor gets plenty of work. I shoot almost every day.

On the financial side I knew being debt free was paramount in achieving the comfort level we wanted as retirees. We planned for years to be in the right condition to retire. We weren't wrong in our approach. We're worth more now than when we sold our business twelve years ago. It's just a wonderful time to be alive for us other than the political landscape. There was never much we could do about it anyway so it is just an aggravation and not much more,,,yet.
Link Posted: 9/8/2021 6:14:16 PM EDT
Wife still works, retires in Jan 22.  I use up my free time fixing outboard motors for a local Marine dealer.


 Wife wants to stay in this house, I want to move a little closer to the coast and have property with actual dirt instead of rocks.
Link Posted: 9/8/2021 9:43:07 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/8/2021 9:48:01 PM EDT
Very relevant post to my concerns

Turning 60 next year.  Wife is 6 years younger than I am.


Numbers are better than I thought they were and we are about to sell a piece our weekend place for twice what I thought it was worth.  That would push our numbers over the edge for me  to quit working full time and do about  500 hours a year consulting.  This is very appealing right now, with the insanity  Wife a has cushy job she likes, that keeps us in medical insurance and she only goes in the office 1 day a week...soon to be only once per month.
Link Posted: 9/8/2021 9:59:45 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NAK:
Very relevant post to my concerns

Turning 60 next year.  Wife is 6 years younger than I am.


Numbers are better than I thought they were and we are about to sell a piece our weekend place for twice what I thought it was worth.  That would push our numbers over the edge for me  to quit working full time and do about  500 hours a year consulting.  This is very appealing right now, with the insanity  Wife a has cushy job she likes, that keeps us in medical insurance and she only goes in the office 1 day a week...soon to be only once per month.
View Quote



Take the deal. Tomorrow may not come. That was my perspective. I'll be 68 and we're having a blast.
Link Posted: 9/9/2021 12:39:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GigEmAggies:
I set a goal, decades ago, to retire at 55 with no dependence on Social Security. I've been with the same financial advisor for all those years and with his help, I got there - retired in early 2019 at 55.

I could have worked another 5 years, but the political crap at my job made me leave. Got tired of seeing good people pushed down or cast aside, while smooth-talking idiots got promoted into positions they neither earned nor deserved.

As soon as your finances are in order, pull the trigger. I've talked to other retirees who wished they'd retired sooner. I highly recommend the retired life
View Quote


Everyday is Saturday!

Paladin
Link Posted: 9/9/2021 1:30:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By mm38:
I retired at the end of June.  I actually stayed about 3½ years longer than I had originally wanted to.

I'm wondering who else that are/were eligible to retire, but well under the "traditional" retirement age, have chosen to retire?  Did the silliness that started in 2020 contribute to the decision?


mm
View Quote


You're lucky.  I probably won't ever be able to retire.  Social Security will be bankrupt before I reach the ever increasing age to collect.  I work in an unstable industry (Tech) and have had my retirement savings decimated by recessions (thanks Clinton and Obama) and layoffs and now runaway inflation (thanks Biden).  So basically it looks like I'm going to be working until I fall over dead at my desk some day.

Link Posted: 9/10/2021 6:43:37 PM EDT
I went at 60 after 33 1/2 years. I was an old man doing a young man's job. I haven't looked back. I did draw my SS at 60 which has helped. The few hundred dollars more vs the risk of waiting wasn't worth it.
Your new hobby will be going to the doctor to get all of those old hurts fixed instead of working through them.
When the gorilla jumps off of your back after turning in your keys, ID badge, and phone will be one of the best days of your life.
Link Posted: 9/10/2021 6:50:43 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mojo:


 How old are you, mm?
View Quote



@mojo  I'm 58.

My late wife and I did plan for retirement.  The original plan was for me to retire at 62, the same time she would have been able to retire.  Things did work out for me though...after paying for medical insurance (COBRA) and taxes i'm still taking home a few hundred more than I was when I was working.  I do have a 401K which I haven't tapped into and am eligible for social security when I'm 60.

mm
Link Posted: 9/11/2021 12:56:23 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SoftwareJanitor:
You're lucky.  I probably won't ever be able to retire.  Social Security will be bankrupt before I reach the ever increasing age to collect.  I work in an unstable industry (Tech) and have had my retirement savings decimated by recessions (thanks Clinton and Obama) and layoffs and now runaway inflation (thanks Biden).  So basically it looks like I'm going to be working until I fall over dead at my desk some day.
View Quote


It's never too late to start...  No one can say what the future will hold, but it pretty much universally better to have some money put away, than not.  

Several of those sentences don't really go together, if you've been in the biz over 20 years and 12 since the great recession.  There are many smart people here who can give some advice or at least point you to some resources to make your own plan.  Or post up your budget and resources and you'll definitely get some advice.
Link Posted: 9/11/2021 9:09:40 AM EDT
I can retire in 1.5 years at age 56. I really like my job so I am probably going to work a couple of extra years as it boosts my retirement pay by 2.3% of my annual salary for every year that I work.
Link Posted: 9/12/2021 1:20:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2021 1:32:24 AM EDT by VaniB]
I'm 67 and retired days from my 63rd birthday. I can't believe how fast those 4.5 years went!! Wife retired 1 year ago, and I needed to let her do that first.... but that year went fast and here I am still sitting around on my ass passing the time. She's 65 now and not young either. Unless you really enjoy working DON'T WAIT LONGER THEN YOU HAVE TO for you to do what you dreamed of doing. You'll get too old.  I notice the difference in my age and health during those 4.5 years, and my wife has all kinds of health issues sneaking up on her in the last couple of years. We still intend to move out of Texas to a dream home in the woods and will start looking soon, but I'm only sorry I waited this long to do it!!!!  I feel like I'll have only just a few good years to enjoy myself in my next house because I waited too long. It sucks having to feel like I am confined to moving somewhere that has good medical nearby. Good medical facilities nearby wasn't even my concern when I retired at 63 just 4 years ago, but now it is. This is the crap that happens when you wait too long.

Enjoy your retirement while you're still young and in decent health. Did I already say not to wait longer then you have to ?? lol
Link Posted: 9/12/2021 1:47:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2021 1:52:58 AM EDT by VaniB]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SoftwareJanitor:


You're lucky.  I probably won't ever be able to retire.  Social Security will be bankrupt before I reach the ever increasing age to collect.  .........

View Quote


Yea, and they said the 2 Trillion dollar debt in 1985 was going to destroy this nation. That was 36 years years ago and here we are at 28.3 trillion now with cash in the mail. lol.  Do you really think that these lying, power hungry politicians who buy votes will EVER tell you "Sorry. No Social Security check for you today" because our account is overdrawn". They haven't stopped thinking up new ways to increase welfare, unemployment benefits, and stimulus checks to try & win favor with you. Your state may not have the funds to waste, but the Fed Government simply prints up cash as needed. They will NEVER refuse to mail you your SS check. When that happens, the USA has ceased to exist, and the globe will follow suit. We will have bigger problems then our missing SS payments if that ever happens    

Link Posted: 9/12/2021 2:30:51 AM EDT
52 here so no talk of retirement.  Wife has been with a major insurance company for 23 years.  She will have a pension and SS.  I will not have a pension or rely on SS, but I've managed to save a significant portion for 20 years.

What is the magic number for a retirement at age 60?  House is paid off.  $500k?  $750?
Link Posted: 9/12/2021 12:40:09 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By L2Free:
52 here so no talk of retirement.  Wife has been with a major insurance company for 23 years.  She will have a pension and SS.  I will not have a pension or rely on SS, but I've managed to save a significant portion for 20 years.

What is the magic number for a retirement at age 60?  House is paid off.  $500k?  $750?
View Quote


"how much you need" depends on "how much you spend". A few years before I retired I tracked how much money I spent in one calendar year. For that year, I spent money as I normally did. At the end of the year, I looked at how much I spent for that year - and told my finance guy I wanted 1/12th of that amount dumped into my checking account every month when I retired, all the way to age 80. At age 80, the monthly amount goes down by 20% until age 100 (big assumption that I'll live past 80 due to family medical history).

So, look at (1) how much you spend, and (2) how long you plan on living. Then do the math.
Link Posted: 9/12/2021 12:59:26 PM EDT
I’m never retiring.
In 10 years, the Lord willing, I’ll collect a pension and move on to some other place of employment or if I still like where I am, not take the pension.
No plans to quit work while I can work .
Link Posted: 9/12/2021 1:23:10 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By VaniB:
DON'T WAIT LONGER THEN YOU HAVE TO for you to do what you dreamed of doing. You'll get too old.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By VaniB:
DON'T WAIT LONGER THEN YOU HAVE TO for you to do what you dreamed of doing. You'll get too old.


This is what I hear all the time from folks who have prepared properly, but  are worried about committing, or have OMY syndrome (One More Year).

I'm not even 50 and I'm already dialing back my homesteading dreams for a retirement property.  Don't want to build myself too much of a new job.  


Originally Posted By L2Free:
52 here so no talk of retirement.  Wife has been with a major insurance company for 23 years.  She will have a pension and SS.  I will not have a pension or rely on SS, but I've managed to save a significant portion for 20 years.

What is the magic number for a retirement at age 60?  House is paid off.  $500k?  $750?


Figure out your budget in retirement, then need 25x or 30x in available investments.  Pensions and SS count as income to reduce your necessary monthly/yearly budget, or if you want to calculate a net worth then count them as around 25x their annual benefit.  

That's another benefit of really prioritizing retirement savings, it forces you to control your budget during your working years, so it's easier to retire being used to a lower budget, which you need a lower net worth to cover.  

So if house is paid off, then budget can be lower.  $500k invested would be pretty safe for $20k annual income.  That's a bit low but possible with pension/SS covering other needs.  If you're planning around usual retirement age, you can be more aggressive in using that money.  If you're 65 then it needs to last 20 years for you and 30 for your wife...  versus someone trying to retire at 50 it needs to last 35/45 years.

Pre-Medicare-age medical is often the key, lots of opinions on how to do that without a job-related program.  Even has people thinking of low-level jobs at Starbucks or other firms that include health benefits with hourly employment.  If you can keep your adjusted gross income (not basic income) under the Obamacare/ACA subsidy limits ($60k-ish for 2) then those costs can be surprisingly reasonable, and built into your annual budget.  Lots of investment income up to certain limits doesn't count for AGI.  May make sense to shop around as some states are better than others.
Link Posted: 9/12/2021 5:36:44 PM EDT
50 is too young unless you are in poor health.

A million dollars now to fund a retirement now is good.

In 10 years it will likely be worth one fourth of that.

At least find a job you love. It will give you some income and enrich your life.
Link Posted: 9/12/2021 7:36:28 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TontoGoldstein:
50 is too young unless you are in poor health.

A million dollars now to fund a retirement now is good.

In 10 years it will likely be worth one fourth of that.

At least find a job you love. It will give you some income and enrich your life.
View Quote


This

Sitting on your ass with no direction will age someone and kill them off fast .  Having a job after you retire allows you to have something you want to do.  If you have never worked a job that you actually enjoy then you have never known what the good life is.
Link Posted: 9/12/2021 7:57:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SoftwareJanitor:


You're lucky.  I probably won't ever be able to retire.  Social Security will be bankrupt before I reach the ever increasing age to collect.  I work in an unstable industry (Tech) and have had my retirement savings decimated by recessions (thanks Clinton and Obama) and layoffs and now runaway inflation (thanks Biden).  So basically it looks like I'm going to be working until I fall over dead at my desk some day.

View Quote


You are in desperate need of a financial/retirement planner. SS is never going bankrupt, it is a pay as you go program. Dont fall for that BS. All market downturns have been recovered from many times over.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 1:52:57 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RenegadeX:


You are in desperate need of a financial/retirement planner. SS is never going bankrupt, it is a pay as you go program. Dont fall for that BS. All market downturns have been recovered from many times over.
View Quote


Its too late for that according to financial planners I've talked to.  SS is already bankrupt, it just doesn't know it yet.  The problem is "pay as you go" doesn't work when there aren't enough people paying in to over the people already drawing.  The millennials are by and large worthless sacks of garbage.  Gen Z is even more useless.  They can't carry the Boomers, they are spoiled and lazy.  GenX is currently barely covering thing, but when older GenXers start to retire in a few years, the system will collapse.

Market downturn recoveries do no good to people who were forced to liquidate during layoffs in the downturns.  There's nothing left to recover.  It was do what you had to do to avoid being homeless.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 9:56:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2021 9:56:21 AM EDT by SmallTownGuy1]
Retired at 45 in east Texas in 2016. Combo of “fck you money” and .mil health problems.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 11:15:48 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mPisi:
I'm not even 50 and I'm already dialing back my homesteading dreams for a retirement property.  Don't want to build myself too much of a new job.
View Quote


exactly, Scot, as you know, my ranch is definitely keeping me always busy
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 11:44:07 AM EDT
Our "number" is right about where it needs to be, but the wild card is medical insurance.

Thanks to Obungocare, it is damned expensive, and is really the only reason that I keep working.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 12:41:12 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bud:
Our "number" is right about where it needs to be, but the wild card is medical insurance.

Thanks to Obungocare, it is damned expensive, and is really the only reason that I keep working.
View Quote


Medical insurance is the killer retiring before 65. If you can get a deal from your employer to buy in through their discounted plan. I got bought out 2 months before turn 65 and negotiated those 2 months be paid in my buy out. Got paid 26 weeks pay, plus my 401K/profit sharing which was pretty healthy that I rolled into my IRA that was pretty decent.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 1:34:28 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mPisi:

I'm not even 50 and I'm already dialing back my homesteading dreams for a retirement property.  Don't want to build myself too much of a new job.  

View Quote



I've been thinking a lot about this.  I've had big dreams about having a decent chunk of land to retire on.  At least 50 acres.

I figure if I'm feeling good (or if the economy/society/etc gets really bad), then I can work the land more.  If I just want to sip margaritas on a beach somewhere (or if get decrepit faster than I thought), I can let the land, well, just be land.  Either way, I'll try to have my dream house built on as big of a lot as I can find/afford.

I've also dreamed about moving north a bit, but after last winter, I'm not sure I can handle the cold weather.  I've never lived anywhere that I've had to shovel snow, so not sure I want to learn how to deal with that kind of weather in my retirement years.  But, damn, I hate triple digit heat.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 3:11:33 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bud:
Our "number" is right about where it needs to be, but the wild card is medical insurance.

Thanks to Obungocare, it is damned expensive, and is really the only reason that I keep working.
View Quote


If you have retired and are not getting an income, ObamaCare is cheap.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 7:38:34 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RenegadeX:

If you have retired and are not getting an income, ObamaCare is cheap.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RenegadeX:
Originally Posted By Bud:
Our "number" is right about where it needs to be, but the wild card is medical insurance.
Thanks to Obungocare, it is damned expensive, and is really the only reason that I keep working.

If you have retired and are not getting an income, ObamaCare is cheap.


For retirement your must Do. The. Math.  Don't listen to other folks (maybe some financial advisors, but not many)

Here's a link for 2 50-year-olds in Texas with a $50k AGI:
https://www.kff.org/interactive/subsidy-calculator/#state=tx&zip=75082&locale=collin&income-type=dollars&income=50000&employer-coverage=0&people=2&alternate-plan-family=&adult-count=2&adults%5B0%5D%5Bage%5D=50&adults%5B0%5D%5Btobacco%5D=0&adults%5B1%5D%5Bage%5D=50&adults%5B1%5D%5Btobacco%5D=0&child-count=0&received-unemployment=0
Silver plan for 2 would be $14,440 per year in premium.  
Yeah, that sucks, but with ACA subsidy you get $11,440 per year, leaving your cost at $2800 per year.  $17,100 out-of-pocket maximum on top of this for health care you actually use (if both are significantly sick).  

If you can control your income to be $30,000 AGI, then the subsidy grows so your cost is only $288 per year!  And the OOP max would be only $5,700.  $30,000 AGI example.  Lower AGI helps both premiums and OOP max, it goes up to a set % of your income.

Previously there have been big subsidy cliffs where the subsidy is abruptly cut above a certain AGI (noted as % of federal poverty line).  This was changed in the Covid rescue acts to say you can't pay more than 8.5% of your AGI on the premiums.  So for the $14,440 premium cited above for 2, you get a decreasing subsidy up to about $169,000 AGI.



Link Posted: 9/13/2021 7:43:41 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mPisi:
For retirement your must Do. The. Math.  

Here's a link for 2 50-year-olds in Texas with a $50k AGI:

View Quote


For Life, you must Learn. To. Read.

I wrote "not getting an income"

If you have  $50K AGI, you are getting an income.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 7:45:16 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DaTrueDave:
I've been thinking a lot about this.  I've had big dreams about having a decent chunk of land to retire on.  At least 50 acres.

I figure if I'm feeling good (or if the economy/society/etc gets really bad), then I can work the land more.  If I just want to sip margaritas on a beach somewhere (or if get decrepit faster than I thought), I can let the land, well, just be land.  Either way, I'll try to have my dream house built on as big of a lot as I can find/afford.

I've also dreamed about moving north a bit, but after last winter, I'm not sure I can handle the cold weather.  I've never lived anywhere that I've had to shovel snow, so not sure I want to learn how to deal with that kind of weather in my retirement years.  But, damn, I hate triple digit heat.
View Quote


You're right in my line of thinking.  I still want a lot of land, but even that is is fading a little.  
I was tracking all the self-sufficiency stuff and wanted things verging on farm, not just garden.  But that ties you down in its own way, besides being a ton of work as you get older.  So it's pretty much dialed back to chickens, regular garden, and maybe a cow or two for color.  Wife likes highland cows, while I want some longhorns.  I once stayed at an AirBNB when the owner also basically did Longhorn rescue.  Just giving a place for a couple to live out their days, not expecting anything out of it.  My farmer cousins are always showing off their cows, I need some longhorns to trump them

Each summer I really want to move north, but it's a hard choice...  Winters don't bother me, but as much brave talk as my wife says, I know there's a limit to how rural and cold she can get.  There is something to be said for your local networks.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 7:49:09 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RenegadeX:
For Life, you must Learn. To. Read.
I wrote "not getting an income"
If you have  $50K AGI, you are getting an income.
View Quote


I was commenting on not having a job, most people retiring early would still have some income from investments/pension/etc.

If you're low enough, then you're on Medacaid, not ACA.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 7:50:44 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mPisi:
If you're low enough, then you're on Medacaid, not ACA.
View Quote


Nope.
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 9:47:43 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RenegadeX:
If you have retired and are not getting an income, ObamaCare is cheap.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RenegadeX:
If you have retired and are not getting an income, ObamaCare is cheap.


Originally Posted By RenegadeX:
Originally Posted By mPisi:
If you're low enough, then you're on Medacaid, not ACA.

Nope.


I started citing those examples since I was agreeing with you that ACA was cheap, assuming no job but some income.  But OK then, please enlighten me how ACA helps with income less than the poverty line, or 0 in your example.  You don't get subsidies at that level.  Yes, you can buy a plan for the full marketplace rates, I guess.  And the other portability and preexisting conditions changes.  



(and for anyone silly enough to be reading along, all my AGIs above should technically be MAGIs)
Link Posted: 9/13/2021 11:05:25 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mPisi:
But OK then, please enlighten me how ACA helps with income less than the poverty line, or 0 in your example.  You don't get subsidies at that level.  Yes, you can buy a plan for the full marketplace rates, I guess.  And the other portability and preexisting conditions changes.  
View Quote


I only posted to help a guy know he might be eligible for significantly discounted ObamaCare, based on my personal experience, not to argue.

He or anyone else is free to call a market place provider and see what he can get. That is what I did. I am pretty satisfied with my subsidies and plan, I am on Ambetter.



Link Posted: 9/15/2021 11:08:16 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RenegadeX:


If you have retired and are not getting an income, ObamaCare is cheap.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RenegadeX:
Originally Posted By Bud:
Our "number" is right about where it needs to be, but the wild card is medical insurance.

Thanks to Obungocare, it is damned expensive, and is really the only reason that I keep working.


If you have retired and are not getting an income, ObamaCare is cheap.


I ran the numbers.  Taxable interest and tax-exempt interest counts as income.  No tax subsidy for me.
Link Posted: 9/15/2021 11:26:05 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bud:
I ran the numbers.  Taxable interest and tax-exempt interest counts as income.  No tax subsidy for me.
View Quote


Yeah, I had to reinvest stuff to avoid that. I also managed to move enough to a Roth to live on until I am 65. It is complicate stuff and takes long term planning.
Link Posted: 9/18/2021 7:10:09 PM EDT
I "retired" early but basically walked away after my kids grew up and were able to take care of themselves without my assistance.  I know I can't stop working for money in order to afford cost of living in the US so I opted to move to a place with low health insurance.  It might not be the best and I might die younger but I'm still alive after all this pandemic and enjoying my days not stressing or being in a job/profession that I grew to hate.

I will probably need to find some seasonal work in the US or maybe I can do better being a bum in CA.  I'm just going to let all you rich folk work for me.

The biggest concern I face is avoiding women, especially the younger ones, so I can try to live poor.
Link Posted: 9/19/2021 12:59:13 AM EDT
I retired in Feb.2016, at 62. Wife and I bought a home in Sun City Georgetown, last April. I lived in Wichita Falls, for over 40yrs, and Sun City is paradise, by comparison. Our kids and grandchildren live just 15min away, in Liberty Hill.
Just wish we has made the move, sooner.
Link Posted: 9/19/2021 2:55:16 AM EDT
I can retire in 5yrs at 53 and I won't feel guilty about it at all.  Everyone keeps asking, "Where are you going to work when you retire?"  They don't seem to know what really retiring is, they seem to confuse it with changing jobs.  Retiring for me means 7-day weekends for the rest of my life.
Link Posted: 9/19/2021 9:19:15 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By brazos609:
"Where are you going to work when you retire?"  
View Quote



That is exactly what I went through.  

I do get some recruiters contacting me, not interested in doing what I used to do though...if something really interesting comes up I may bite.  A few have been people looking for a cheap ISO facilitator/implementer but I really don't want to travel.

Right now, I'm pretty content to just study for my amateur radio General license and watch 14 different school buses stop in front of my house each morning and then again each afternoon....some of those moms are really hot.


mm
Link Posted: 9/20/2021 1:07:23 PM EDT
Next thing you know, you'll be at the grocery store "accidentally" knocking things down with your cane trying to get women to help you pick it up.
Link Posted: 9/20/2021 1:11:22 PM EDT
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
An error occurred on the server when processing the URL. Please contact the system administrator.

If you are the system administrator please click here to find out more about this error.