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Posted: 12/14/2020 7:01:51 PM EDT
I need help with my jambalaya guys, and I'm afraid the cooking forum or GD would be a shit show if I asked there.  

I like cooking jambalaya, but it seems like every time I cook it the rice burns on the bottom of the pot.  Sometimes the burnt tastes is throughout the whole pot, sometimes its just a layer at the bottom that's black.  

My basic procedure goes something like this:  brown my meat, take it out, brown my sausage, add onions n bell peppers, put the meat back in and simmer til its fork tender.  Then I add enough liquid for the amount of rice I'm cooking and crank the heat up.  When its boiling good I dump in the rice, cook out most of the liquid, then put the lid on and turn the fire down low for 20 minutes.  Just like if I was cooking rice on the stove top.  

Saturday night I did it just like that with a whole chicken, and 5 minutes after I added the rice it was already sticking to the bottom of my dutch oven.  The jambalaya actually turned out great, its just the whole layer of rice on the bottom was black.  

All the couyons on youtube cook the rice separate and add it at the end.  I want to do it the old fashioned way with 1 pot.  

Any advice will be appreciated.  Go ask your paran and get back with me.
Link Posted: 12/15/2020 3:01:25 PM EDT
Take my advice with a grain of salt, as I'm up here in the hills of Lincoln Parish.

I usually make jambalaya with leftover chicken that's already cooked/picked, so YMMV. Heat up the pot while slicing your sausage (I slice mine into quarter rounds for jambalaya), then render every bit of fat you can out of it - not burned, but a nice crisp crust on it. I then add my onions to the sausage grease, and cook 'til tender. Then add your rice dry, and cook it a little bit in the grease & onions - almost like you're making Spanish rice or something. Once you can smell the rice cooking (kind of a nutty scent), then add back in your sausage, picked chicken, and enough stock to cook the rice. Bring to a boil, lower to a simmer, season to taste, clamp on the lid, and stir every few minutes. The "toasted" rice doesn't stick or clump nearly as bad as raw rice, and it adds even more flavor to the jambalaya.

My imported wife (from Iberville Parish) says don't you dare forget the white beans. Blue Runner is fine if you ain't got time.
Link Posted: 12/15/2020 5:33:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Logan45:
I need help with my jambalaya guys, and I'm afraid the cooking forum or GD would be a shit show if I asked there.  

I like cooking jambalaya, but it seems like every time I cook it the rice burns on the bottom of the pot.  Sometimes the burnt tastes is throughout the whole pot, sometimes its just a layer at the bottom that's black.  

My basic procedure goes something like this:  brown my meat, take it out, brown my sausage, add onions n bell peppers, put the meat back in and simmer til its fork tender.  Then I add enough liquid for the amount of rice I'm cooking and crank the heat up.  When its boiling good I dump in the rice, cook out most of the liquid, then put the lid on and turn the fire down low for 20 minutes.  Just like if I was cooking rice on the stove top.  

Saturday night I did it just like that with a whole chicken, and 5 minutes after I added the rice it was already sticking to the bottom of my dutch oven.  The jambalaya actually turned out great, its just the whole layer of rice on the bottom was black.  

All the couyons on youtube cook the rice separate and add it at the end.  I want to do it the old fashioned way with 1 pot.  

Any advice will be appreciated.  Go ask your paran and get back with me.
View Quote


Your whole approach is wrong because you've been misled at some point.
"All the couyons on youtube cook the rice separate and add it at the end.  I want to do it the old fashioned way with 1 pot."
The couyons are correct, jambalaya is traditionally a mix of the leftover meat and rice from a previous meal with
additional spices and stretchers added.
The "old fashioned way" you describe is a recipe/technique that was  invented back when "Cajun food" became a thing.
My grandmother, who could barely speak english, would have been puzzled by anyone asking how to cook jambalaya in one pot.
Link Posted: 12/15/2020 6:44:10 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By rttlsnkndaddy:
Take my advice with a grain of salt, as I'm up here in the hills of Lincoln Parish.

I usually make jambalaya with leftover chicken that's already cooked/picked, so YMMV. Heat up the pot while slicing your sausage (I slice mine into quarter rounds for jambalaya), then render every bit of fat you can out of it - not burned, but a nice crisp crust on it. I then add my onions to the sausage grease, and cook 'til tender. Then add your rice dry, and cook it a little bit in the grease & onions - almost like you're making Spanish rice or something. Once you can smell the rice cooking (kind of a nutty scent), then add back in your sausage, picked chicken, and enough stock to cook the rice. Bring to a boil, lower to a simmer, season to taste, clamp on the lid, and stir every few minutes. The "toasted" rice doesn't stick or clump nearly as bad as raw rice, and it adds even more flavor to the jambalaya.

My imported wife (from Iberville Parish) says don't you dare forget the white beans. Blue Runner is fine if you ain't got time.
View Quote

That's not a bad technique.  I've done one with leftover pork chops and grilled sausage kinda like that, with rice cooked on the side however.  Its my "leftovers" jambalaya and its not as good as one from scratch but it ain't bad.  And yes white beans are a perfect pairing with jambalaya.
Link Posted: 12/15/2020 6:47:40 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By kleeb:


Your whole approach is wrong because you've been misled at some point.
"All the couyons on youtube cook the rice separate and add it at the end.  I want to do it the old fashioned way with 1 pot."
The couyons are correct, jambalaya is traditionally a mix of the leftover meat and rice from a previous meal with
additional spices and stretchers added.
The "old fashioned way" you describe is a recipe/technique that was  invented back when "Cajun food" became a thing.
My grandmother, who could barely speak english, would have been puzzled by anyone asking how to cook jambalaya in one pot.
View Quote

I don't claim to know everything about cooking, being only 35 and all.  However my grandfather was as French as they come and he cooked his in one pot, according to what I've been told.
Link Posted: 12/17/2020 5:26:21 PM EDT
Didn't mean to question the Frenchness of your kinfolk.

I'm not surprised to hear that recipe/techniques vary a lot from area to area.
When I started getting away from home I was surprised at what cooks from Houma did to their
gumbo compared to how it was cooked at home.

For what it's worth both my grandma's and my mom made jambalaya in one pot.
It just consisted of already cooked meat, already cooked rice, chopped onions, peppers, and as many eggs
as necessary to stretch the jambalaya to feed the supper crowd.(Grandma Merzy had 11 kids, my mom had 12)

Once all the ingredients were mixed in a single pot enough water was added to keep the rice from burning
and the mix was cooked until the raw ingredients were cooked.

It was a good meal but I don't remember it being over the top delicious,
I don't doubt starting from scratch would produce a better tasting result, it's just that the meal cooked
the way you describe would not have been called jambalaya where I was raised.

So, where ya from? Or more important, Where's ya family from?

I was raised in west end of St. Landry Parish just east of Eunice.
Link Posted: 12/18/2020 11:47:44 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By kleeb:
Didn't mean to question the Frenchness of your kinfolk.

I'm not surprised to hear that recipe/techniques vary a lot from area to area.
When I started getting away from home I was surprised at what cooks from Houma did to their
gumbo compared to how it was cooked at home.

For what it's worth both my grandma's and my mom made jambalaya in one pot.
It just consisted of already cooked meat, already cooked rice, chopped onions, peppers, and as many eggs
as necessary to stretch the jambalaya to feed the supper crowd.(Grandma Merzy had 11 kids, my mom had 12)

Once all the ingredients were mixed in a single pot enough water was added to keep the rice from burning
and the mix was cooked until the raw ingredients were cooked.

It was a good meal but I don't remember it being over the top delicious,
I don't doubt starting from scratch would produce a better tasting result, it's just that the meal cooked
the way you describe would not have been called jambalaya where I was raised.

So, where ya from? Or more important, Where's ya family from?

I was raised in west end of St. Landry Parish just east of Eunice.
View Quote

I'm from Kinder, been here most of my life.  Most of my family is from around here, though if you go back more than a generation or two they come from all over.  

Its funny how different parts of the state do things differently.  My brother lived in Laplace for a while for work, and things were totally different down there.  Basically if you drive 30 minutes in any direction, you get a different accent and different cooking methods.  

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