Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
User Panel

Site Notices
Posted: 7/12/2022 11:33:01 AM EDT
We caught an image last night on the game camera.  We are trying to determine which cat this might be.   I am purposely not saying what I think it is, so I don't muddy the waters.

Link Posted: 7/12/2022 11:37:38 AM EDT
[#1]
Malnourished Bobcat?



i may have to change my answer, i think the ears make it a Ocelot or i could be wrong, again
Attachment Attached File


Link Posted: 7/12/2022 11:55:12 AM EDT
[#2]
Looks like a bobcat.
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 12:59:00 PM EDT
[#3]
Babcat

Time for a hunt OP!
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 1:03:32 PM EDT
[#4]
Looks like a bobcat to me
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 2:52:57 PM EDT
[#5]
Ok, the majority of responses say Bobcat.  Maybe emaciated but could be a Bobcat.  Unfortunately, we don't have any other images that show the markings on the cat's body.  At first look I was thinking it was an Ocelot.  Looking at the shape of the ears, feet, and the fur on its face look more like and Ocelot than a Bobcat.  Even the physique looks more like and Ocelot than a Bobcat.

I was really hoping for an Ocelot since they are endangered.
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 3:18:24 PM EDT
[#6]
Looks more ocelot to me.  bobs have shorter legs I think.  But in general I would leave it alone unless its damaging something of yours.

Contact the local game warden, they may be able to trap it if its looking for food pretty easily and rehab or remove, or put it down if its sick.
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 3:25:26 PM EDT
[#7]
I have no intentions of harming the cat.  I do shoot at the feral hogs when we see them and can get a clear shot.  My wife has reached out to some folks at the Parks and Wildlife Department.  So far, the one response we received said Bobcat.
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 4:31:21 PM EDT
[#8]
The place we used to hunt, Coleman Co. between Brownwood and San Angelo, there were always reports of big cats, occasionally someone would shoot a mountain lion. Probably 10 years back, there were several people who claimed to have seen ocelots or "mexican spotted cats".

Around Dallas though, it's just bobcats everywhere. Even in town. You do not want to corner one and piss it off.
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 6:47:07 PM EDT
[#9]
About 7 years ago one of our regular customers showed a phot from the game camera he had on the concrete water trough at his place between Bertram and Burnet.  It was a really clear photo and it was easy to a Black Panther.
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 6:52:48 PM EDT
[#10]
Looks long and angular to be a bobcat, even an emaciated one.
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 9:38:14 PM EDT
[#11]
Stumpy-tailed Speckled Possum
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 10:35:13 PM EDT
[#12]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I have no intentions of harming the cat.  I do shoot at the feral hogs when we see them and can get a clear shot.  My wife has reached out to some folks at the Parks and Wildlife Department.  So far, the one response we received said Bobcat.
View Quote

I still say ocelot.  The legs seem too long to be a bobcat, and the ear patch is much more pronounced than you'd expect in a babcat.
Link Posted: 7/12/2022 10:57:35 PM EDT
[#13]
Any photos of the tail? That would be diagnostic for determining the species.

What county? Ocelot had a large range before eradication. Now their numbers are stuffed into far reaches of the Rio Grande Valley.

Anything is possible with even mountain lions. One was documented in Rowlett and through the Princeton area a couple years ago.

Like all sightings, pics or it didn't happen rule applies.
Link Posted: 7/13/2022 8:07:55 AM EDT
[#14]
This is Burnet County, east of Lake Buchannon.  Lots of ranch land that is undeveloped so there is a lot of areas for the cats to hide out during the day.
Link Posted: 7/13/2022 9:15:15 AM EDT
[#15]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
This is Burnet County, east of Lake Buchannon.  Lots of ranch land that is undeveloped so there is a lot of areas for the cats to hide out during the day.
View Quote


Bobcat for sure. But anything is possible and can be justified if you have solid proof.

The Rowlett mountain lion for instance defied all logic. Here is a video of it along Dalrock

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPQneAndbEs

Link Posted: 7/13/2022 10:41:19 AM EDT
[#16]
We are hoping for another photo of the cat.  we have multiple cameras around the property.  Maybe we will get lucky and get a photo that shows the tail clear enough to make the final determination on which species.

We have seen a couple of unusual animals out here.  we watch and American Hog Nose Skunk wander around one evening.  Neither of us had ever seen a Hog Nosed Skunk.  The local game warden had not seen one either.  

The variety of plants and animals that are native to our place continues to amaze us.
Link Posted: 7/13/2022 11:17:55 AM EDT
[#17]
90% it's a bobcat but could be an ocelot if in deep south Texas.
Link Posted: 7/13/2022 11:20:21 AM EDT
[#18]
Wife and I had a discussion about that. Ears remind us of an ocelot, but the markings and shape scream bobcat. Could be some weird hybrid?
Link Posted: 7/13/2022 11:27:28 AM EDT
[#19]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

We have seen a couple of unusual animals out here.  we watch and American Hog Nose Skunk wander around one evening.  Neither of us had ever seen a Hog Nosed Skunk.  The local game warden had not seen one either.  

View Quote



I have seen one at Colorado Bend State Park. There is a pretty stable population of them centric to an area South of San Saba, North of Llano and west of Burnet.
Link Posted: 7/14/2022 10:49:45 AM EDT
[#20]
Those legs and ears just don't match a bobcat IMO.  Even if emaciated, a bobcat's legs are short and stocky in appearance, and they have very defined ear structure.  We have quite a few bobcats around here, and I occasionally flush one out while mountain biking on our local trail.  There have been one or two families of them living out there for decades.

Especially in Texas, it's not that unusual to see far ranging, out of habitation animals.  However, I'm still waiting for Bigfoot pics.
Link Posted: 7/14/2022 11:29:36 AM EDT
[#21]
It does look more like an ocelot than a bobcat, but hard to tell.  You are quite a ways from what's considered the range of the Texas ocelot, but that doesn't mean one hasn't moved further north.

These folks help protect the ocelots that are left in Texas, and might be able to take a look at your photo and see what species it is.

https://www.texasocelots.com/


[email protected]
Link Posted: 7/14/2022 6:14:13 PM EDT
[#22]
Thanks for the information.  I will reach out to them.
Link Posted: 7/14/2022 8:28:59 PM EDT
[#23]
I'm going with a large bobcat that is malnourished.... there are tons of large bobcats in Burnet County, plenty of turkeys, rabbits, fawns, etc to predate upon.

Hard to say without seeing the tail.

Looks a bit too tall to be an ocelot to my eyes, I'm no expert as I've only seen one in the wild in my lifetime, but have seen a couple of mountain lions and a metric shit ton of bobcats of all sizes in Burnet Co as well as a couple of very large black cats in Bastrop County.

Link Posted: 7/15/2022 12:41:15 AM EDT
[#24]
That’s a bobcat OP. I know you’re hoping for Ocelot but it’s not.  Still beautiful animal to have on your place.
Link Posted: 7/15/2022 8:28:27 AM EDT
[#25]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Those legs and ears just don't match a bobcat IMO.  Even if emaciated, a bobcat's legs are short and stocky in appearance, and they have very defined ear structure.  
View Quote


That's the way I'm leaning, although I haven't seen enough scrawny bobcats to say definitively that that's not what it is.  It's certainly not a healthy, normal bobcat.
Link Posted: 7/15/2022 4:00:25 PM EDT
[#26]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


That's the way I'm leaning, although I haven't seen enough scrawny bobcats to say definitively that that's not what it is.  It's certainly not a healthy, normal bobcat.
View Quote

Like I said, it might be a hybrid. The markings and general shape match a bobcat well, but the ears don't. Could be a bobcat mixed with some domestic cat.
Link Posted: 7/15/2022 6:00:13 PM EDT
[#27]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Like I said, it might be a hybrid. The markings and general shape match a bobcat well, but the ears don't. Could be a bobcat mixed with some domestic cat.
View Quote

Bobcats are normally stockier (shorter legs and not as lean).  Usually not this spotted (adults), either, but sometimes they do have prominent spots in adulthood.
Link Posted: 7/15/2022 11:17:01 PM EDT
[#28]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Those legs and ears just don't match a bobcat IMO.  Even if emaciated, a bobcat's legs are short and stocky in appearance, and they have very defined ear structure.  We have quite a few bobcats around here, and I occasionally flush one out while mountain biking on our local trail.  There have been one or two families of them living out there for decades.

Especially in Texas, it's not that unusual to see far ranging, out of habitation animals.  However, I'm still waiting for Bigfoot pics.
View Quote


They are out there.

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 7/21/2022 1:16:27 PM EDT
[#29]
It kind of looks like a jaguarundi, but it is probably an ocelot.
Link Posted: 7/21/2022 7:23:53 PM EDT
[#30]
I sent the photo to the folks at Friends of Laguna Atascosa.  I'm waiting to hear back on what they see.  We just got back from the property and checked around the area of the game camera as well as around the edge of the water.  We did not see any type of cat tracks at the edge of the water.  No other photos have shown up yet.

But I am looking forward to getting pictures of Big Foot on our cameras.
Link Posted: 7/21/2022 8:26:15 PM EDT
[#31]
Mike Bodenchuk is the cat expert in Texas. You can look him up and contact him if you run into a dead end. He works for USDA and is the best of the best when it comes to knowing cats, tracking and trapping. When mountain lions are on the prowl Mike is on their scent.
Link Posted: 7/22/2022 1:06:12 AM EDT
[#32]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
It kind of looks like a jaguarundi, but it is probably an ocelot.
View Quote


Gents, it’s a bobcat. Not an Ocelot or Jaguarudi. This is reaching GD snake ID levels.
Link Posted: 7/22/2022 1:58:17 AM EDT
[#33]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

This is reaching GD snake ID levels.
View Quote


So what you're really saying is it's a gotdam evil PitBull and should be nuked from fucking earth
Link Posted: 7/22/2022 8:23:38 AM EDT
[#34]
If we did that, would the feral hogs glow in the dark?
Link Posted: 7/22/2022 8:59:40 AM EDT
[#35]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
If we did that, would the feral hogs glow in the dark?
View Quote


Crap, I hope so!  That would turn my coors light into night vision goggles.
Link Posted: 7/22/2022 9:18:45 AM EDT
[#36]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Gents, it’s a bobcat. Not an Ocelot or Jaguarudi. This is reaching GD snake ID levels.
View Quote


Don't get your shorts in a wad.  It's actually a saber tooth tiger long thought extinct by nonbelievers.  And just this morning I saw a 25' python in my corn bin.
Link Posted: 7/23/2022 9:56:53 PM EDT
[#37]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Don't get your shorts in a wad.  It's actually a saber tooth tiger long thought extinct by nonbelievers.  And just this morning I saw a 25' python in my corn bin.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:


Gents, it’s a bobcat. Not an Ocelot or Jaguarudi. This is reaching GD snake ID levels.


Don't get your shorts in a wad.  It's actually a saber tooth tiger long thought extinct by nonbelievers.  And just this morning I saw a 25' python in my corn bin.


I'd take BobWeaver's word on it as he's very knowledgeable in this field, and spends a ton of time in the wild, particularly in OP's AO.

I'm no expert either, but as previously mentioned in this thread I have seen tons of bobcats in OP's AO in various states of health throughout my entire lifetime.  I have not lived in Burnet County in over 24 years but have hunted there my entire life.

It's an emaciated older bobcat from what I can see in the pic.

Here's a healthy female from the same county as OP, that I shot the day before deer season opener last year.


Link Posted: 7/24/2022 6:09:40 PM EDT
[#38]
Quoted:
We caught an image last night on the game camera.  We are trying to determine which cat this might be.   I am purposely not saying what I think it is, so I don't muddy the waters.

https://www.ar15.com/media/mediaFiles/43677/Night_Visitor_JPG-2450066.jpg
View Quote


FWIW, if your camera settings will allow you to have the camera take 2 photos every time it detects motion, you'll often solve these questions.
Link Posted: 7/25/2022 9:35:40 AM EDT
[#39]
I will look at the camera settings.  That could help.
Link Posted: 7/25/2022 9:37:29 AM EDT
[#40]
On a side note, I saw a news story this AM about Jaguars being more common in southern AZ now.  Man, I thought they were more of a jungle animal.  Interesting story, and perhaps increased human activity has caused them to move outside their more common habitat.
Link Posted: 7/25/2022 1:41:11 PM EDT
[#41]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
On a side note, I saw a news story this AM about Jaguars being more common in southern AZ now.  Man, I thought they were more of a jungle animal.  Interesting story, and perhaps increased human activity has caused them to move outside their more common habitat.
View Quote



They were native to the SW U.S. including Texas and are still in parts of Norther Mexico.
Link Posted: 7/27/2022 11:21:23 PM EDT
[#42]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



They were native to the SW U.S. including Texas and are still in parts of Norther Mexico.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
On a side note, I saw a news story this AM about Jaguars being more common in southern AZ now.  Man, I thought they were more of a jungle animal.  Interesting story, and perhaps increased human activity has caused them to move outside their more common habitat.



They were native to the SW U.S. including Texas and are still in parts of Norther Mexico.

Yes, that is true, there has been some recent sightings in the US.

At one time, according to some material I've read from historical documents, they used to roam as far north as what is known as the Buchanan Basin along the Colorado River, along with black bears, jaguarandi and red wolves but the settlers along with market hunters wiped them all out.

I'm convinced the pair of large black cats I saw about 17 years ago not far from Bastrop were black jaguars, I cannot confirm that's what I saw, but they were being chased across an open pasture, approximately 450-500 yds wide at about 100 yds away from where me and a coworker were standing, by a very large APBT type dog .

These cats were definitely larger than a mountain lion as they dwarfed the 100lb+ dog that was hot on their trail.

I know it sounds like BS, but at the time there had been several confirmed sightings of large black cats along the Colorado River between Austin and the Gulf Coast.

OP's cat is an emaciated bobcat.
Link Posted: 8/1/2022 5:05:24 PM EDT
[#43]
I once encountered a jaguarundi on my ranch
Link Posted: 8/1/2022 6:02:56 PM EDT
[#44]
1948 was the last physical proof they existed when what was thought to be the last Jaguar in TX was killed near Kingsville.  I have had several old timers, ranchers and farmers, swear they had sightings back into the 1980’s, and one rancher in a remote area between Nixon and Cuero claiming to have seen one several times between 2006-2012 when I was doing some work on his ranch.  He was in his 80’s and an ex TX Ranger who knew the land and its species very, very well, so I trusted he was telling the truth.

I’ll admit this much, if I knew for a fact that there were Jaguars roaming the woods at night, I would definitely not do some of the solo eradication work I’ve done in the past.  Short of a Bengal Tiger, I don’t think there is anything else out there that would frighten me more than knowing a Jaguar could be lurking in the shadows.  It’s neat to know they were fairly common throughout Central Texas not that long ago.
Link Posted: 8/2/2022 3:31:01 PM EDT
[#45]
jaguarundi are relatively small
Close Join Our Mail List to Stay Up To Date! Win a FREE Membership!

Sign up for the ARFCOM weekly newsletter and be entered to win a free ARFCOM membership. One new winner* is announced every week!

You will receive an email every Friday morning featuring the latest chatter from the hottest topics, breaking news surrounding legislation, as well as exclusive deals only available to ARFCOM email subscribers.


By signing up you agree to our User Agreement. *Must have a registered ARFCOM account to win.
Top Top