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Posted: 1/21/2021 8:05:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/22/2021 12:44:50 PM EST by Gopher]
From the GOA today.
* links fixed

Since the 87th Legislative Session began last week, Texas legislators have filed three important pieces of legislation to help restore our right to keep and bear arms and to keep Texans safe. All three of these are priority legislation for Gun Owners of America.

SJR 24 by Senator Bob Hall: Constitutional Carry through Constitutional Amendment
This piece of legislation proposes to amend the Texas Constitution by adding that the Legislature “may not require a citizen of this state to obtain a license or permit to wear arms.” It would nullify the current statutory requirement to have an LTC to carry a handgun. In order to amend the Constitution, the House and the Senate must approve the language by a 2/3 majority, and Texas voters must approve a related ballot proposition by a majority vote in the following November election.  

https://capitol.texas.gov/tlodocs/87R/billtext/pdf/SJ00024I.pdf#navpanes=0

Senator Hall stated: "I am ready to advance the cause of liberty and protect the rights of Texans across the state."
HB 1238 by Representative Kyle Biedermann: Constitutional Carry
This bill would repeal the requirement to obtain a permit to carry a handgun, providing that anyone who is legally able to purchase a handgun (under Federal and state law) may carry it, open or concealed, without a permit, in the same places where a license holder can now carry a handgun. The exception is that no one can use this law to lawfully carry a handgun while committing any crime other than a Class C traffic misdemeanor.

https://capitol.texas.gov/tlodocs/87R/billtext/pdf/HB01238I.pdf#navpanes=0



Rep. Biedermann stated: "Self defense is a fundamental right of all humans and you should not have to rely on the government to access that right."
HB 1094 by Rep. Tom Oliverson: Domestic Violence Protection
This bill acknowledges that a piece of paper called a “protective order” is unable to keep a violent abuser from continuing to harm a victim – or even to take the victim’s life. It provides that anyone age 18 or older who is legally able to purchase a firearm and currently protected under a protective order (or similar restraining order) does not need to obtain a license in order to carry a handgun. It would exempt such people from “gun-free” zones listed in Texas Penal Code 46.03 and 46.035. Their family and household members (not including abusers named in the protective order) would be able to carry a handgun to protect themselves in the same manner.
https://capitol.texas.gov/tlodocs/87R/billtext/pdf/HB01094I.pdf#navpanes=0

Rep. Oliverson stated: “Victims of domestic violence should not have to wait for the State of Texas to send them a card in the mail to use their 2nd amendment rights to protect themselves from imminent harm.”
We thank these legislators for filing these important pieces of legislation and we commit to advocating strongly for these bills throughout this legislative session.

In addition to prioritizing the above bills, Gun Owners of America is also prioritizing the following pieces of legislation which were pre-filed, and which we have previously announced to you:
Federal Firearms Protection
HB 112 by Rep. Steve Toth; HB 635 by Rep. Matt Krause; HB 919 by Rep. Ben Leman – These bills prohibit state & local government entities from enforcing future Federal statutes, rules, orders, or regulations that regulate a firearm, accessory, or ammunition and that do not exist in state law. HB 112 also provides that individual officers or other personnel who violated this law could face a Class A misdemeanor. HB 635 includes all such Federal regulations, past and future.
“Made in Texas”
HB 915 by Rep. Matt Krause would declare that firearms and ammunition manufactured in Texas from Texas parts, and sold in Texas, are not subject to Federal regulations.
Suppressor Freedom

HB 957 by Rep. Tom Oliverson would declare that firearm suppressors manufactured in Texas from Texas parts, and sold in Texas (“Made in Texas” suppressors), are not subject to Federal regulations.

Anti-”Red Flag” Law
HB 336 by Rep. Briscoe Cain would keep Texas out of any Federal Red Flag scheme and would prohibit any entity in this state from enforcing a "Red Flag" gun confiscation law not enacted by our state legislature.

Curtail Emergency Powers
HB 26 by Rep. Valoree Swanson; HB 340 by Rep. Briscoe Cain – These bills would repeal the Governor’s powers to regulate or control the sale, transportation, and use of firearms and ammunition during a disaster declaration or state of emergency, while HJR 40 by Rep. James White proposes an amendment to the Texas Constitution to ensure that the Governor never has power to suspend or limit the sale or transportation or firearms.  
View Quote


It will be interesting to see how the Mad Mommies and Everytown argue against the Domestic violence bill.
Link Posted: 1/21/2021 9:02:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/24/2021 10:00:01 PM EST by DonofKalifornia]
This is the first time Constitutional Carry bills have been filed in both the house and Senate. The bills are very close  so there is a much better chance of Constitutional Carry passing.

ETA:  The big difference between the two bills is the Senate bill is a constitutional amendment. That requires a high threshold to pass both the house and senate. It needs to pass by 2/3’s not simple majority. Quite a bit harder to get passed. Worse is if passed this November it would go on the ballot for the public to vote on. This would bring in billions on BloomTURD dollars running ads against and getting uneducated voters out to vote. This not only would end Constitutional Carry for decades, using the excuse the people of Texas don’t want it.
Link Posted: 1/22/2021 1:13:19 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/22/2021 1:38:16 AM EST by CleverNickname]
OP, edit the links in your post so they don't have the extra space at the front.  They're not working because of that.

Originally Posted By Gopher:
HB 1094 by Rep. Tom Oliverson: Domestic Violence Protection
This bill acknowledges that a piece of paper called a “protective order” is unable to keep a violent abuser from continuing to harm a victim – or even to take the victim’s life. It provides that anyone age 18 or older who is legally able to purchase a firearm and currently protected under a protective order (or similar restraining order) does not need to obtain a license in order to carry a handgun. It would exempt such people from “gun-free” zones listed in Texas Penal Code 46.03 and 46.035. Their family and household members (not including abusers named in the protective order) would be able to carry a handgun to protect themselves in the same manner.
https://capitol.texas.gov/tlodocs/87R/billtext/pdf/HB01094I.pdf#navpanes=0
View Quote


I just read the text of this bill, and it would allow such a person under a protective order to carry at any school (not just colleges), at polling places, at courthouses, at racetracks, in secured areas of airports, at private colleges who post 30.06 signs, and at 51% locations.  The only places I see that they still wouldn't be able to carry are jails & prisons, mental institutions, and within 1000 feet of an execution.  Also, although they would be able to carry a handgun at those places, they aren't exempted from 46.03(a-1), so they'd still be prevented from carrying location-restricted knives at the listed restrictive locations, just like anyone else.  It seems sort of strange that they wouldn't make 46.03(a-1) not applicable either.  "Sure, carry your handgun to court, but take a switchblade to an amusement park and it's off to jail with you, buddy."

I hope this is a sneaky way to set the stage to modify the law again in a later bill and remove the restrictions for everyone.

Link Posted: 1/23/2021 1:43:52 PM EST
I wondered how they would react.

Texas, we need to be ready:

In 2019, Texas enacted nearly a dozen dangerous gun laws, many of which went into effect less than a month after the hate-fueled mass shooting in El Paso, and less than 24 hours after the shooting spree in Midland and Odessa. And now the Texas legislature is back for more.

State lawmakers are already talking about policies that would allow people to carry guns just about anywhere.
They want to weaken safety requirements for school marshals to carry firearms in K-12 schools.
They even want to scrap the permitting system that currently requires a background check and safety training to carry a hidden, loaded handgun in public.
At a time when armed extremists are threatening our state and federal governments and trying to scare people away from participating in democracy, Texas lawmakers should be working to strengthen our gun safety laws, not dismantle them.

Everytown.

Link Posted: 1/24/2021 8:58:37 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Gopher:
I wondered how they would react.

Texas, we need to be ready:

In 2019, Texas enacted nearly a dozen dangerous gun laws, many of which went into effect less than a month after the hate-fueled mass shooting in El Paso, and less than 24 hours after the shooting spree in Midland and Odessa. And now the Texas legislature is back for more.

State lawmakers are already talking about policies that would allow people to carry guns just about anywhere.
They want to weaken safety requirements for school marshals to carry firearms in K-12 schools.
They even want to scrap the permitting system that currently requires a background check and safety training to carry a hidden, loaded handgun in public.
At a time when armed extremists are threatening our state and federal governments and trying to scare people away from participating in democracy, Texas lawmakers should be working to strengthen our gun safety laws, not dismantle them.

Everytown.

View Quote

Oh no!  Armed extremists are everywhere!  Shame on governments for not making sure that every potential victim is disarmed and vulnerable!
Link Posted: 1/25/2021 7:26:05 PM EST
Weekly update.

Filed Bills
Constitutional Carry, HB 1238 by Rep. Kyle Biedermann – repeals the requirement to get a permit to carry a gun, allowing open or concealed carry for anyone who can legally purchase a gun in the same places where LTC holders can currently carry

Constitutional Carry by Constitutional Amendment, SJR 24 by Sen. Bob Hall – proposes an amendment to the Texas Constitution to prohibit the Legislature from requiring a license to carry.

Domestic Violence Victim Defense, HB 1094 by Rep. Tom Oliverson – recognizes that a piece of paper doesn’t protect a victim, and allows anyone 18+ who is protected under a protective order and can legally possess a firearm to carry a handgun without a license and in “gun-free” zones.

See initial list of GOA priority legislation.

Public Participation in the Legislative Process
During the first week of session, the House and the Senate each approved a set of rules (HR 4, SR 1 & SR 2).

The Senate requires members of the public to show a negative COVID test before attending a committee hearing or entering the gallery. Each Senate office will decide its own requirements for meetings with constituents.

The House will not require testing, but is focusing on mask requirements.

The Senate will allow testimony via videoconference for Redistricting hearings, and all House committees can allow invited testimony by video. However, neither chamber has made a move to allow any other video testimony.

House committees must allow the public to give written statements on the public record on bills set for a committee hearing and must post those statements online.

The House adopted a new set of emergency rules which are in place currently and will remain in place until the House votes to deactivate them. Under these rules, House committees do not have to allow the public to testify or attend hearings in person and can simply broadcast a committee hearing online.

Amendments Shot Down
Several Representatives moved to amend the House Rules to help increase public participation and get important business done.

Rep. Tinderholt moved to require committees to vote on moving a bill out of committee at the request of the bill author. Many bills die because the committee chair refuses to call for a vote. This amendment died on a 21-122 vote (House Journal page 175).

Rep. Slaton moved to require the House to vote on whether to abolish abortion before voting on renaming highways and bridges. Rep. Tinderholt moved to amend Slaton’s motion to require the House to vote on the Texas GOP priorities – including Constitutional Carry – before voting on renaming highways and bridges. Tinderholt’s amendment died on a point of order; Slaton’s motion died on a 41-99 vote. (House Journal pages 191-93).

Rep. Vasut and Rep. Biedermann each moved to reduce the mask requirements. Their amendments died on 23-119 votes. (House Journal pages 193-96.)

Rep. Cason moved to require committees to always allow in-person testimony. His amendment died on a 40-102 vote. (House Journal page 197).

NOTE: The House now requires 3 members to request a recorded vote in which the names of representatives who voted each way are notated in the House Journal. Thanks to Reps. Biedermann, Cason, and Slaton for requesting a recorded vote on all of these amendments. Click the House Journal links to read the recorded votes.

In Their Own Words
"Self defense is a fundamental right of all humans and you should not have to rely on the government to access that right." (Rep. Kyle Biedermann, announcing the filing of the HB 1238, Constitutional Carry).

“It is past time for the Texas Legislature to recognize that requiring a permit does not make us safer—it only makes victims more vulnerable.” (Texas Director Rachel Malone on the filing of HB 1238.)  

“[HB 1238] would remove the ‘Mother, may I?’ to the government to get your permit.” (Paul Lathrop, interviewing Rachel Malone on the Daily Bullet, 1/25/21.)

“If legislators decide to show up, pay attention to the people of Texas, and work hard to pass legislation that restores our liberties – that's how we’ll know they mean business.” (Rachel Malone in the Houston Courant.)
Link Posted: 1/25/2021 9:18:17 PM EST
Link Posted: 1/25/2021 10:08:04 PM EST
This is from GOA Texas. The e-mail has the links to the bills. I highly suggest everyone sign up for their e-mail list. TSRA is slacking IMHO.
Link Posted: 1/25/2021 10:37:48 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Gopher:
This is from GOA Texas. The e-mail has the links to the bills. I highly suggest everyone sign up for their e-mail list. TSRA is slacking IMHO.
View Quote



But, people here say they don’t do anything.. The GOA in Texas is very focused, not getting distracted by one or two idiots that file anti-gun bills.

Sign up with GOA, not only for their updates, but their Zoom meetings. You will learn a lot on how to deal with the Texas legislature.
Link Posted: 1/26/2021 2:23:09 AM EST
The constitutional amendment sounds hot.

But like was said earlier, that opens up a bigger fight and puts much more on the table.

Those votes show that there is either a lot of fear about the teriyaki tremors or they are happy to have an excuse to limit public access to their bullshit.
Link Posted: 1/26/2021 12:02:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/26/2021 12:04:20 PM EST by Gopher]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By joshdb50:
The constitutional amendment sounds hot.

But like was said earlier, that opens up a bigger fight and puts much more on the table.

Those votes show that there is either a lot of fear about the teriyaki tremors or they are happy to have an excuse to limit public access to their bullshit.
View Quote





Amen. There are a number of folks on both sides that will do anything they can to limit public discussion on these CC bills.
Link Posted: 1/26/2021 12:21:01 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By joshdb50:
The constitutional amendment sounds hot.

But like was said earlier, that opens up a bigger fight and puts much more on the table.

Those votes show that there is either a lot of fear about the teriyaki tremors or they are happy to have an excuse to limit public access to their bullshit.
View Quote

They've not doubt greatly enjoyed not having to deal with real oversight for the past year.
Link Posted: 1/26/2021 2:21:16 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By joshdb50:
teriyaki tremors
View Quote

Teriyaki is Japanese cuisine; don't blame them.
Link Posted: 1/26/2021 5:04:16 PM EST
IMHO the Biderman secession bill blows his credibility on the CC bill out of the water. Don't get me wrong,,I'm all for getting out from under the left/right coast thumbs,,but trying to secede in todays environment via any Constitutional amendment is a fools play.  "That nut that wants to secede wants the wild wild west too"
Link Posted: 1/26/2021 5:19:18 PM EST
IMHO the Biderman secession bill blows his credibility on the CC bill out of the water. Don't get me wrong,,I'm all for getting out from under the left/right coast thumbs,,but trying to secede in todays environment via any Constitutional amendment is a fools play.  "That nut that wants to secede wants the wild wild west too"
Link Posted: 1/26/2021 5:48:31 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ACEB36TC:
IMHO the Biderman secession bill blows his credibility on the CC bill out of the water. Don't get me wrong,,I'm all for getting out from under the left/right coast thumbs,,but trying to secede in todays environment via any Constitutional amendment is a fools play.  "That nut that wants to secede wants the wild wild west too"
View Quote

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