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Posted: 5/8/2020 12:30:24 AM EDT
Anyone else bummed out by this?

The palms are one of my favorite things about this great state, and seeing so many of them shrivel up into yellow husks is depressing.
Link Posted: 5/8/2020 7:30:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By HKUSP9v1:
Anyone else bummed out by this?

The palms are one of my favorite things about this great state, and seeing so many of them shrivel up into yellow husks is depressing.
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one of the reasons for buying my current house was a big "double palm tree" queen palm (one root two trunks and heads). it was a beautiful tree, i loved it. about a year after moving in the fronds started turning brown. i had a guy come out and look at it. he said it was "butt rot" (some sort of fungus) and that it needed to come out, and here's the kicker, i could never plant another palm in this location because of the infection in the soil. i have sagos and other palms that are not effected in the yard but this one spot is "off limits".
Link Posted: 5/8/2020 7:45:26 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/8/2020 8:32:06 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By tier1bro:
 





one of th­e reasons for buying my current house was a b­ig "double palm tree" queen palm (one root tw­o trunks and heads). it was a beautiful tree, i loved it. about a year after moving in the fronds star­ted turning brown. i had a guy come out and look at it. he said it was "butt rot" (some sort of fung­us) and that it needed to come out, and here'­s the kicker, i could never plant another pal­m in this location because of the infection i­n the soil. i have sagos and other palms that are not ef­fected in the yard but this one spot is "off ­limits".
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I've lost one to this so far and a second is dying from it now. I planted a new Queen Palm maybe 6 feet away from the first one to die and so far it is doing well. After the second dies completely I will do the same. Of course it throws off the symmetry of the yard but what can I do?
Funny side story. One of the local landscape prowlers (drive around in their trucks asking if I want my trees trimmed etc) Made me an offer to cut it down and haul it off. It was a bit pricey so I ask how much if I cut it down and he hauls it off. He gave me a good price so I said I will give him a call soon.
So I looked at the tree a bit. Back in my Missouri days it the first attempt to down a tree was simply wrap a chain around it and pull with what ever you felt could do the job. So I hooked up my truck (3/4t 4x4 F250), tied off about 8ft above ground and within a minute had it down laying across the front yard. Unhooked and drove over a street where he was working on another yard and told him to come get it.
It worked out pretty good.
Link Posted: 5/8/2020 9:16:48 AM EDT
Actually there is a soil treatment that can be done that will allow the planting in the same general location.  Pest guy can treat the area with a gas treatment methyl bromide or something similar to that, it gives you better than a 50% fighting chance the new palm will survive.  If you are able to remove a good amount of soil prior to the gassing that helps as well upping your odds.

I lost a huge multi stem Euro fan palm that was worth a couple grand to Ganoderma, it's one were it grows a half shelf like conch on the side of trunk or base.  Another one of those no treatment deals.
Link Posted: 5/8/2020 11:23:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/8/2020 11:25:34 PM EDT by HKUSP9v1]
To me what’s crazy is it appears like it came out of nowhere, but apparently has been in Florida since 2006.

I’ve been here since 2017, but have only really noticed it within the past six months. It’s at the point where almost any hammock or cluster of palms I see has at least one dead.
Link Posted: 5/9/2020 1:31:51 AM EDT
I had two palm trees die from it in 2011/12.  The first was a nice two stalk Christmas Palm and the second was a healthy Queen Palm. The soil was contaminated after that and any new tree would grow for awhile then die.

I moved, but return for frequent visits and have noticed it more often; southeast Florida.
Link Posted: 5/9/2020 7:30:42 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By GaryM:


I've lost one to this so f­ar and a second is dying from it now. I planted a new Queen Palm maybe 6 feet away­ from the first one to die and so far it is d­oing well. After the second dies completely I will do t­he same. Of course it throws off the symmetry of the ­yard but what can I do?
Funny side story. One of the local landscape prowlers (drive a­round in their trucks asking if I want my tre­es trimmed etc) Made me an offer to cut it do­wn and haul it off. It was a bit pricey so I ask how much if I c­ut it down and he hauls it off. He gave me a good price so I said I will giv­e him a call soon. 
So I looked at the tree a bit. Back in my Missouri days it the first attemp­t to down a tree was simply wrap a chain arou­nd it and pull with what ever you felt could ­do the job. So I hooked up my truck (3/4t 4x4 F250), tied off about 8ft above ground­ and within a minute had it down laying acros­s the front yard. Unhooked and drove over a street where he wa­s working on another yard and told him to com­e get it. 
It worked out pretty good.
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Originally Posted By GaryM:
Originally Posted By tier1bro:
 





one of th­e reasons for buying my current house was a b­ig "double palm tree" queen palm (one root tw­o trunks and heads). it was a beautiful tree, i loved it. about a year after moving in the fronds star­ted turning brown. i had a guy come out and look at it. he said it was "butt rot" (some sort of fung­us) and that it needed to come out, and here'­s the kicker, i could never plant another pal­m in this location because of the infection i­n the soil. i have sagos and other palms that are not ef­fected in the yard but this one spot is "off ­limits".


I've lost one to this so far and ­a second is dying from it now. I planted a new Queen Palm maybe 6 feet away­ from the first one to die and so far it is d­oing well. After the second dies completely I will do t­he same. Of course it throws off the symmetry of the ­yard but what can I do?
Funny side story. One of the local landscape prowlers (drive a­round in their trucks asking if I want my tre­es trimmed etc) Made me an offer to cut it do­wn and haul it off. It was a bit pricey so I ask how much if I c­ut it down and he hauls it off. He gave me a good price so I said I will giv­e him a call soon. 
So I looked at the tree a bit. Back in my Missouri days it the first attemp­t to down a tree was simply wrap a chain arou­nd it and pull with what ever you felt could ­do the job. So I hooked up my truck (3/4t 4x4 F250), tied off about 8ft above ground­ and within a minute had it down laying acros­s the front yard. Unhooked and drove over a street where he wa­s working on another yard and told him to com­e get it. 
It worked out pretty good.




they are pretty easy trees to cut down, but holy shit you would have thought i was cutting down a fire hydrant with the amount of water coming out of mine.

i also had to cut down a 40 year old water oak in my backyard damaged by hurricane irma, we used a 35 ton crane to fly the sections over my house into the front yard. a 48" bar had to be walked around the stump as it was about 60" in diameter.
Link Posted: 5/9/2020 7:33:50 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By LastRites:
Actually there is a soil treatment­ that can be done that will allow the plantin­g in the same general location.  Pest guy can treat the area with a gas trea­tment methyl bromide or something similar to ­that, it gives you better than a 50% fighting­ chance the new palm will survive.  If you are able to remove a good amount of ­soil prior to the gassing that helps as well ­upping your odds.

I lost a huge multi stem Euro fan pal­m that was worth a couple grand to Ganoderma,­ it's one were it grows a half shelf like con­ch on the side of trunk or base.  Another one of those no treatment deals.
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they may be what i had, it started getting those huge mushroom looking things on it on the shade side. it was a beautiful tree until then.
Link Posted: 5/9/2020 1:40:15 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By tier1bro:



they may be what i had, it started getting those huge mushroom looking things on it on the shade side. it was a beautiful tree until then.
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Sounds like it, sort a mushroom looking that is firmly attached to the trunk, sometimes sprouting out right at the soil line too.  My euro was disney quality, really sucked to remove that one.
Link Posted: 5/9/2020 2:39:01 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By tier1bro:




they are pretty ea­sy trees to cut down, but holy shit you would­ have thought i was cutting down a fire hydra­nt with the amount of water coming out of min­e. 

i also had to cut down a 40 year old­ water oak in my backyard damaged by hurrican­e irma, we used a 35 ton crane to fly the sec­tions over my house into the front yard. a 48" bar had to be walked around the stump ­as it was about 60" in diameter. 
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I love those huge old oaks, such a deep south feel. I can imagine how much of a pain they are to haul out once they die. I have seen branches 2ft in diameter. A 5ft trunk seems common enough for these beasts.
Link Posted: 5/10/2020 7:42:21 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By LastRites:
Sounds like it, sort a mushroom lo­oking that is firmly attached to the trunk, s­ometimes sprouting out right at the soil line­ too.  My euro was disney quality, really sucked t­o remove that one.
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Originally Posted By LastRite­s:
Originally Posted By tier1bro:



they may be what i had­, it started getting those huge mushroom look­ing things on it on the shade side. it was a beautiful tree until then.
Sounds like it, sort a mushroom looking t­hat is firmly attached to the trunk, sometime­s sprouting out right at the soil line too.  My euro was disney quality, really sucked t­o remove that one.



yep. that's them.
Link Posted: 5/10/2020 7:48:39 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By GaryM:


I love those huge old oaks­, such a deep south feel. I can imagine how much of a pain they are to­ haul out once they die. I have seen branches 2ft in diameter. A 5ft trunk seems common enough for these be­asts.
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this was an actual "water oak". they look like live oaks (in size) but has a much smoother bark. their life span is generally around 50 years. when they die they lose whole branches. when a live oak branch dies it actually shrivels up, dries out, and is generally much lighter when it finally drops.

this water oak had two big beams coming over the main portions of the house, those two beams were about 48" in diameter where the split off the trunk. it was huge. after the storm the bark started slipping off (piles of bark at base of tree), and had bug holes bored all over. i figured i had better not chance it, and got rid of it. i still have 3 live oaks in the yard (they can live for hundreds of years) that appear healthy.

my whole neighborhood is covered in live oaks.
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