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Posted: 1/7/2021 2:51:48 PM EST
Rem Oil is getting hard to find and I'm looking for a replacement that has the same properties.

I do not use it as a lube.  I have other products that I prefer.

However, I loved Rem Oil as a wipe down for the firearm.  I'd use it as a general wipe down, light cleaning, and light protectant.  The Rem Oil was thin and evaporated quickly which may have made it a lousy lube.  For me, those same properties made it great as a wipe down.  I'd wipe down a firearm and leave it sit, the majority would evaporate and I'd wipe down the rest.  It left a bit of PTFE behind which was nice.

You can hardly find it now though and I'm not sure what other products might share similar properties.

Any recommendations?
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 3:06:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/7/2021 3:06:50 PM EST by FALKommando]
Super Lube Multi-Use Synthetic Oil. Basically the same shit with PTFE.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 3:47:01 PM EST
Ballistol.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 3:50:30 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By finnfan:
Ballistol.
View Quote


+1
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 3:56:23 PM EST
Mobil 1 European formula has  the most  PTFE of all motor oils and it will do it all lube and protect . For what its worth the best protectant is EEZOX.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 4:00:37 PM EST
Lucas Synthetic gun oil. Sold at O'Reilley's auto parts.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 4:38:36 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By finnfan:
Ballistol.
View Quote



This
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 7:35:08 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By finnfan:
Ballistol.
View Quote


+1

You’ll get used to the smell.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 8:14:48 PM EST
Tri-Flow.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 9:40:23 PM EST
Rem oil is trash. My buddy would wipe his 30-06 down with it and the thing would start getting surface rust in his closet. But it was also a remmington 710 which is a budget 30-06 from walmart. He was using the rem oil wipes.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 9:47:50 PM EST
Kroil.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 2:21:55 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By finnfan:
Ballistol.
View Quote
This is the way.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 2:59:13 AM EST
I like Eezox and Ballistol.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 6:48:17 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/8/2021 6:54:26 AM EST by LampShadeActual]
Lucas Oil “Red” gun oil sold often at auto parts places.  Thin, proper lube, does not dry, and does not run off.  Exactly what you asked for.  If you liked RemOil, this is way better and inexpensive.
 
https://lucasoil.com/products/out-door-line/gun-oil

Their Extreme Duty oil is very good, but needs to go on thin.  It is thick enough that if golluped on, slows .22 semi auto function.

https://lucasoil.com/products/out-door-line/extreme-duty-gun-oil

[As a side note, some PTFE oils break down and create rust in storage as opposed to use.]
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 7:59:50 AM EST
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 8:11:01 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GONIF:
Mobil 1 European formula has  the most  PTFE of all motor oils and it will do it all lube and protect . For what its worth the best protectant is EEZOX.
View Quote

As a lube, I love Mobil 1 but it offers almost no rust protection and would not be my choice for a wipe down product.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 8:33:00 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BobCole:
Lucas Synthetic gun oil. Sold at O'Reilley's auto parts.
View Quote


This stuff is great.
Link Posted: 1/10/2021 4:41:25 AM EST
Birchwood Casey Barricade.
A quick mist on the outside of the gun and a wipe with a clean soft rag, done!
Link Posted: 1/11/2021 10:09:34 AM EST
What you will get is a lot of personal likes/dislikes, which is all any of us can provide. Here is mine.

Currently I have an even dozen gun oils and now 7 gun greases of various ages on my work bench. As far as an oil lubricant I can tell little difference in actual uses between the various gun oils with a couple of exceptions. And only grease, not oil, gets used on my break action shotgun hinge pins and auto loading handgun rails.

As far as corrosion protection Rem Oil is at the very bottom of the list in effectiveness in my own expensive experience and in a couple of detailed published tests. Here is one opinion. Grant Cunningham is high on Lubriplate, which I have never tried, but does a good job explaining the various lubricant products. This work has also been reviewed by oil engineers. In case you don't want to read his article at the link I will just include his quote on Rem Oil.

"Frankly, in terms of mechanical performance, most oils “work”; some are better than others, but everything will make parts move for a while. The weakest area of most oils is in corrosion resistance – and on a gun, corrosion is a bad thing! There have been lots of claims, but those people who have actually taken the time to run experiments to test corrosion on steel have found that the products with the greatest hype are often the worst at corrosion resistance. Not surprisingly, plain mineral oils, such as Rem Oil, score at the very bottom of the list. (To that you can usually add most of the plant- or vegetable-based oils.)"

https://www.grantcunningham.com/2006/05/lubrication-101/

Ballistol has been mentioned and I found it to be as good as most, IF you can get past the stomach turning, gag and puke inducing, God-awful stink of the stuff. I tried it a number of times and eventually just threw it in trash as it stunk up the whole garage. My wife wouldn't even come in it if she caught a hint of that stuff when she walked through the door. I'm not really smell sensitive, but Ballistol stinks. OP, should you decide to try Ballistol, best to take a sniff of it first. It may or may not affect you the same way as it affects me.

For years and years my choice for the outside of my guns has been EEZOX. It's synthetic and a do-all similar to CLP, but better. Regardless of what cleaner I use on the inside of my guns the outside always gets wiped down with EEZOX. Overnight it dries and protects with that dry film, unlike petroleum based oils which can often feel "oily" the next day after cleaning.

Shotguns especially get handled a lot during a long day of competition at trap/skeet, which means sweaty hands on them during the hot months. Those same shotguns are handled even more on hot sweaty day-long dove hunts in the field. EEZOX never fails to protect my carbon steel break action shotguns during those times. Rem Oil failed big time the only time I ever used it before an opening day dove hunt on one of my over/under Browning shotguns.

Like most others, I had bought Rem Oil simply because it was packaged and sold as a Remington product (which it isn't, as its made by a contract blender) and I thought they would only sell a quality product. They taught me otherwise.


Link Posted: 1/11/2021 10:12:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/11/2021 10:14:11 AM EST by delta25]
Duplicate, please ignore.
Link Posted: 1/11/2021 10:23:02 AM EST
I’ve always liked WD40 for wiping down guns. It’s not the best preservative out there but as long as you’re doing regular maintenance it works great. I just spray some on a microfiber and wipe down. Plus it smells good. Just don’t use it inside a gun, it has absolutely no place there.
Link Posted: 1/11/2021 1:55:37 PM EST
I dont mind the smell of ballistol at all. I think I'm an outlier. I used is liberally in my basement workshop lol
Link Posted: 1/22/2021 12:46:59 PM EST
Break Free CLP.

On new guns I clean the parts completely (as in de-grease them).

MEK works well here.

Heat the parts gently (around 250 F), then immerse them in a
glass pan full of Break Free CLP and allow them to cool.

Wipe of excess.
Link Posted: 1/23/2021 2:20:29 AM EST
Clenzoil.  I'm a fanboi now.
Link Posted: 1/23/2021 8:08:17 AM EST
Link Posted: 1/23/2021 1:08:00 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By delta25:
What you will get is a lot of personal likes/dislikes, which is all any of us can provide. Here is mine.

Currently I have an even dozen gun oils and now 7 gun greases of various ages on my work bench. As far as an oil lubricant I can tell little difference in actual uses between the various gun oils with a couple of exceptions. And only grease, not oil, gets used on my break action shotgun hinge pins and auto loading handgun rails.

As far as corrosion protection Rem Oil is at the very bottom of the list in effectiveness in my own expensive experience and in a couple of detailed published tests. Here is one opinion. Grant Cunningham is high on Lubriplate, which I have never tried, but does a good job explaining the various lubricant products. This work has also been reviewed by oil engineers. In case you don't want to read his article at the link I will just include his quote on Rem Oil.

"Frankly, in terms of mechanical performance, most oils “work”; some are better than others, but everything will make parts move for a while. The weakest area of most oils is in corrosion resistance – and on a gun, corrosion is a bad thing! There have been lots of claims, but those people who have actually taken the time to run experiments to test corrosion on steel have found that the products with the greatest hype are often the worst at corrosion resistance. Not surprisingly, plain mineral oils, such as Rem Oil, score at the very bottom of the list. (To that you can usually add most of the plant- or vegetable-based oils.)"

https://www.grantcunningham.com/2006/05/lubrication-101/

Ballistol has been mentioned and I found it to be as good as most, IF you can get past the stomach turning, gag and puke inducing, God-awful stink of the stuff. I tried it a number of times and eventually just threw it in trash as it stunk up the whole garage. My wife wouldn't even come in it if she caught a hint of that stuff when she walked through the door. I'm not really smell sensitive, but Ballistol stinks. OP, should you decide to try Ballistol, best to take a sniff of it first. It may or may not affect you the same way as it affects me.

For years and years my choice for the outside of my guns has been EEZOX. It's synthetic and a do-all similar to CLP, but better. Regardless of what cleaner I use on the inside of my guns the outside always gets wiped down with EEZOX. Overnight it dries and protects with that dry film, unlike petroleum based oils which can often feel "oily" the next day after cleaning.

Shotguns especially get handled a lot during a long day of competition at trap/skeet, which means sweaty hands on them during the hot months. Those same shotguns are handled even more on hot sweaty day-long dove hunts in the field. EEZOX never fails to protect my carbon steel break action shotguns during those times. Rem Oil failed big time the only time I ever used it before an opening day dove hunt on one of my over/under Browning shotguns.

Like most others, I had bought Rem Oil simply because it was packaged and sold as a Remington product (which it isn't, as its made by a contract blender) and I thought they would only sell a quality product. They taught me otherwise.


View Quote


About sums up my thoughts/experience on all this too...

My first thought when seeing the original OP's question was along the lines of 'why would anyone want to 'replace' such a shitty product with anything.  Aim higher...'

Then I decided to keep my mouth shut and try not to hurt anyone's feelings.  After all, firearms refinishers need to keep busy too, and using RemOil will certainly make it more likely that you'll need them.

As stated in the quote, there have been 'tests' of many of the gun products over the years.  Of course, there are always new wonder products being introduced, always better than all earlier products, of course...

We all have our personal preferences about/with these types of products.  Some are even based on many years/decades of experience with some of them.

Sometimes we even keep products around for nostalgic reasons.  For example, I keep some Hoppes #9 'bore cleaner' around because I occasionally like to get a whiff of it.  I don't use it as a bore cleaner because, well, it's not a great bore cleaner (and hasn't been ever since they took the nasty chemicals out of it several decades ago).  Then again, we're not talking about bore cleaners here...

In terms of personal preferences for products being discussed here, I do have a couple that work for me.  Are they the best (whatever that really means)?  Hell, I don't know but they work for me.

For a light grease substitute, I usually use a nickel based anti-seize (usually Permatex or Locktite).  For example, for lubing the 'wear points' on an M1 Garand or the pivot pins on a break action shotgun, etc.  One potential downside is you have to be careful not to get any on your clothes (if that matters to you).  Then again, you'll have the same problem with any good 'grease' or effective oil product.

For a lubricating oil, I use the Birchwood Casey Synthetic Gun Oil.  Are there other good synthetic gun oils available?  Well, yes, but the BC stuff has worked well for me.

For a surface rust preventative that doesn't leave an oily, wet surface, I use BC Sheath/Barricade.  The vehicle dries, leaving a protectorant surface.  I use it on the exterior steel surfaces of guns (unless I don't mind a little oil (like on parkerized surfaces)) and I finish my bore cleaning with a final wet patch of Sheath/Barricade.  It dries within a short period of time and works well to protect the metal surface.  In addition, since it dries, you can shoot through the bore without having to clean any oil out first...

Anyway, them's my thoughts.  

Just sayin'...

Forrest


Link Posted: 1/23/2021 8:01:28 PM EST
A member here did a pretty thorough test of about 40 or so different products and this one scored the highest for protecting steel from rusting.
Link Posted: 1/23/2021 8:24:43 PM EST
Rem Oil will never touch my comp guns OR my ARs but it works wonders for "spraying down" all my shotguns and other stuff. I scored TWO large spray cans today and I'm done for life. Boretech is the goto for any/all real guns.
Link Posted: 1/24/2021 9:53:26 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ftierson:

My first thought when seeing the original OP's question was along the lines of 'why would anyone want to 'replace' such a shitty product with anything.  Aim higher...'

Then I decided to keep my mouth shut and try not to hurt anyone's feelings.  After all, firearms refinishers need to keep busy too, and using RemOil will certainly make it more likely that you'll need them.

We all have our personal preferences about/with these types of products.  Some are even based on many years/decades of experience with some of them.

For a surface rust preventative that doesn't leave an oily, wet surface, I use BC Sheath/Barricade.  The vehicle dries, leaving a protectorant surface.  I use it on the exterior steel surfaces of guns (unless I don't mind a little oil (like on parkerized surfaces)) and I finish my bore cleaning with a final wet patch of Sheath/Barricade.  It dries within a short period of time and works well to protect the metal surface.  In addition, since it dries, you can shoot through the bore without having to clean any oil out first...

View Quote


When I first got into adult air guns years ago Beeman sold Sheath and I used it on all my quality German-made barrel cocking spring air guns for years. It worked extremely well as a rust preventive. My oldest Beeman air rifle is 40 years old and not a speck of rust on the barrel or anywhere else. And it has been shot A LOT, especially when it was the only one of that type that I owned. Example is when I ordered that rifle I also order 5 tins of 500 pellets each and shot them all up within the first two weeks. 2500 pellets and each shot by grabbing the barrel and cocking it. I did not then and do not now wipe down an air rifle barrel after each shooting session. Birchwood Casey now sells the same product as Sheath only they renamed it Barricade for the retail market while keeping the name Sheath for the commercial large container market. Or so they claim.

That Sheath and later Beeman's own oil, which I think is just Sheath in their own branded container, has always done great on all my air rifles and air pistols. And those barrel cocking air rifle barrels are handled constantly, as in every shot. If I had used Rem Oil they would have been a rusty mess in no time. Rem Oil is as crappy a rust preventive as any product sold for use on guns. As I said in my previous note, it was an expensive lesson I learned when it failed to protect a beautifully finished Browning over/under shotgun the only time I used it on the outside of one of my guns.

Thanks for the heads  up on Sheath/Barricade. I have a can in my cart ready for the next order I make. Then I'll have 13 different gun use oils on my workbench. As Grant Cunningham says in his article, most gun oils work to keep parts moving for a time, with some being better than others. But where many fail is in corrosion protection. In that use Rem Oil is safely ensconced among the very bottom performing of the "we be sucking" group.
Link Posted: 2/1/2021 12:27:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/1/2021 1:57:18 PM EST by Slvrktman]
Anyone try Gibb’s oil. Really lifts light rust...wipe it off, EVEN ON A BRAND NEW GUN, and the rag usually shows some light brown. Dry to the touch after a bit.

http://www.roadsters.com/gibbs/#intro
Link Posted: 2/1/2021 12:32:45 PM EST
Rig Rag
Link Posted: 2/1/2021 1:48:34 PM EST
Rem Oil isn't that great
Link Posted: 2/1/2021 7:47:54 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Slvrktman:
Anyone try Gibb’s oil. Really lifts light rust...wipe it off, EVEN ON A BRAND NEW GUN, and the rag usually shows some light brown. Dry to the touch after a bit.

http://www.roadsters.com/gibbs/#intro
View Quote


i still have a can and a half of that around. I swear it's part ATF. It kept going up in price and I switched over to Kroil years ago because I could always get a 2 for 1 offer at least once or twice a year so $16 or so got you a couple big ass cans and shipping.
Link Posted: 2/2/2021 7:23:26 AM EST
I used the Gibbs stuff on the magnesium differential case of a vintage Lotus race car that I used to tend to.  Kept the magnesium nice looking, and it cleaned off after race dirt/debris well, and it seemed to hold up under high heat conditions.  Inboard disc brakes right next to the diff in a fully enclosed body get pretty hot.
Link Posted: 2/2/2021 7:41:31 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BlitzPig:
I used the Gibbs stuff on the magnesium differential case of a vintage Lotus race car that I used to tend to.  Kept the magnesium nice looking, and it cleaned off after race dirt/debris well, and it seemed to hold up under high heat conditions.  Inboard disc brakes right next to the diff in a fully enclosed body get pretty hot.
View Quote


I always thought Gibbs was kind of a local thing in the central northern states.
Link Posted: 2/2/2021 8:31:38 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bucket-Back:
Rem Oil isn't that great
View Quote

In fairness to Rem Oil, I do know of at least one situation where it works better then anything else I've tried...

Every now and then I'll get an AR receiver that has a "chalky" finish. I've tried a number of different lubes/oils and none of them would "fix" the issue. As soon as you wiped them off (or they dried off) it would go back to the "chalky" looking finish.

Rem Oil in the aerosol can was the only thing that worked. Spray it on liberally, let it sit for 15 minutes or longer, wipe off the excess and voila, you are left with an attractive, satin black finish and chalky look is gone forever.
Link Posted: 2/2/2021 11:57:16 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By airgunner:

In fairness to Rem Oil, I do know of at least one situation where it works better then anything else I've tried...

Every now and then I'll get an AR receiver that has a "chalky" finish. I've tried a number of different lubes/oils and none of them would "fix" the issue. As soon as you wiped them off (or they dried off) it would go back to the "chalky" looking finish.

Rem Oil in the aerosol can was the only thing that worked. Spray it on liberally, let it sit for 15 minutes or longer, wipe off the excess and voila, you are left with an attractive, satin black finish and chalky look is gone forever.
View Quote


Interesting...

Forrest
Link Posted: 2/2/2021 6:55:01 PM EST
I use LPS-3 on airplanes and it’s damn good for corrosion.  

Would work on guns but is kinda nasty.
Link Posted: 2/2/2021 6:59:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/2/2021 7:01:17 PM EST by fxntime]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By samuse:
I use LPS-3 on airplanes and it’s damn good for corrosion.  

Would work on guns but is kinda nasty.
View Quote


I've used that for many years on the insides of the doors and underneath my vehicles. I used to buy it by the case. A few years ago though, I think they changed the formula and I wasn't as impressed with it. I liked how the older stuff really got into the cracks and folds of door skins and such and then set. If yiu did it right and it was warm enough, you'd never get any rust inside the door skins. Never EVER let it [vehicle] sit on a nice drive after using the old LPS-3, you'll have waxy splooge everywhere.
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