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Posted: 1/14/2021 8:57:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/14/2021 8:58:24 PM EST by bruh44]
I have a very unique house. From the looks of it, I think they tore down a barn, built a foundation, framed the house with 16x16 beams and sided it with the barn. The down side of that is it’s VERY inefficient heating and cooling wise. I’ve started dealing up air leaks inside the walls with expanding foam. It’s made a big difference so far.
There is one leak I have no idea how to fix. The entire first floor is surrounded by these 16x16 beams. Butted up to them is the wood flooring.  The space between the beams and the floor is constantly cold and lets cold air in. The floor is standard touge  and groove wood flooring. It’s pretty tight up against the beams around it. I went under the house and used foam all around the foundation. The floor is pretty well insulated but I cannot stop the air leak between the beams and the flooring. It’s so tight against each other I can’t get anything in there to seal it. I tried pulling the molding off to get non expanding foam in there but the space isn’t enough to get the little straw from the foam can in there.
Does anyone know of something I could get in there to seal it up? Any other ideas?
Link Posted: 1/14/2021 9:34:58 PM EST
Probably need ms paint to understand what you are describing. I had a post and beam floor house and the plan (sold before I did it) was to put insulation bats in between the joists and secure them with mesh so they stay in place. Sounds like that is not what you have.

Maybe get a vapor barrier or something breathable like tyvek to at least prevent air movement? I don't think you are supposed to use a vapor barrier under the floor as it could cause mold, but tyvek may work.
Link Posted: 1/15/2021 12:36:13 AM EST
Be careful spraying foam or attaching foam from the foundation up and onto the floor beams. Termites can hide behind it.
Link Posted: 1/15/2021 1:17:57 AM EST
Spend $600 or so on a thermal camera.  Take a targeted approach and fix things that need fixing vs. shotgunning repairs hoping they work.

I was surprised where my heat holes were.  Seek shot pro paid for itself pretty quick.
Link Posted: 1/15/2021 12:41:41 PM EST
Look into Rockwool Insulation, they may have something you could use.
Link Posted: 1/16/2021 10:01:03 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SnowMule:
Spend $600 or so on a thermal camera.  Take a targeted approach and fix things that need fixing vs. shotgunning repairs hoping they work.

I was surprised where my heat holes were.  Seek shot pro paid for itself pretty quick.
View Quote


I have one, that’s how I figured this out.
I guess I could simplify this and just say I need something to fill a gap in wood that’s on average 1/16” of an inch but is the length of my house. Some spots are more like 1/32”. I was hoping to find a liquid that will get down there and harden to stop the airflow.There is molding over it so it wouldn’t need to be pretty.
Link Posted: 1/16/2021 6:32:58 PM EST
Get a spray foam kit and just apply a very thin layer to create an air seal.
Thicker if you want to insulate it.

An elastomeric paint might also work.
Link Posted: 1/17/2021 11:14:15 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/17/2021 11:17:36 AM EST by bruh44]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Handydave:
Get a spray foam kit and just apply a very thin layer to create an air seal.
Thicker if you want to insulate it.

An elastomeric paint might also work.
View Quote

Spray foam won’t get down that crack I’ve tried. I I don’t think that paint is made for wood use. I’m specifically looking for something to stop the cold are from coming in.

Someone recommended to me to try liquid flex seal. I’m not sure that the best for wood either but so far I can’t come up with anything better.
Link Posted: 1/17/2021 12:29:10 PM EST
How about caulking the crack shut with something like OSI Quadmax? No, it doesn’t insulate per se, but it would stop the airflow and it should allow for the seasonal movement of the wood.
Link Posted: 1/17/2021 1:19:16 PM EST
Great Stuff - several varieties (fire resistant, rodent/insect resistant, large crack, 'minimal swell'). For closing gaps between floor joists, brad nail 1x2 wood strips to the bottom of the joists (both sides) creating a runner which can be used to "shelf support" tightly fitted 1/2" Styrofoam insulation. As you install, lay the 'pink stuff' on the Styrofoam shelf between the Styrofoam and the flooring with the vapor barrier correctly positioned.
Link Posted: 1/17/2021 7:09:56 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/19/2021 6:54:38 AM EST by Handydave]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bruh44:

Spray foam won’t get down that crack I’ve tried. I I don’t think that paint is made for wood use. I’m specifically looking for something to stop the cold are from coming in.

Someone recommended to me to try liquid flex seal. I’m not sure that the best for wood either but so far I can’t come up with anything better.
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View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bruh44:
Originally Posted By Handydave:
Get a spray foam kit and just apply a very thin layer to create an air seal.
Thicker if you want to insulate it.

An elastomeric paint might also work.

Spray foam won’t get down that crack I’ve tried. I I don’t think that paint is made for wood use. I’m specifically looking for something to stop the cold are from coming in.

Someone recommended to me to try liquid flex seal. I’m not sure that the best for wood either but so far I can’t come up with anything better.


Spray foam from the underside coating the entire subfloor.
Elastomeric paint will adhere to properly prepared wood.
Link Posted: 1/17/2021 8:59:51 PM EST
How about some photos so people can give good advice
Link Posted: 1/19/2021 2:40:14 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Toyoland66:
How about some photos so people can give good advice
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I don’t have access to a free photo server anymore. I definitely would. I think I got enough ideas to make something work.
Link Posted: 1/22/2021 4:38:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/22/2021 4:44:51 PM EST by dangerdan]
Without seeing what underneath your house looks like, I'm going to assume it's at least a basic pier and beam style foundation.
You should probably do something like this:

Attachment Attached File


This pic is of an insulated floor. However, if you foam (closed cell foam) just the corners (and not the field in-between joists), you should have a very good air seal.

Don't use open cell foam for the exterior of the home. It can trap humidity and cause rot. Plus it's not as good at air sealing as closed cell, but it does have good uses elsewhere in the home.
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