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Posted: 1/7/2021 12:21:53 AM EST
I've been working the jail with my current department for about a year with no road experience.

Wife and I are relocating after I got hired on a much more rural department(17 or so people per square mile, 2 deputies for the entire county on 3rd shift etc.).

Too green to even know what to ask so I'll leave this one open ended.  We're selling the house and moving 4hrs away for this so I really can't fuck this one up if I want to stay married.

Any words of advice, things you like to see out of a new trainee, or stuff you regularly see the new guys screw up?
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 12:27:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/7/2021 12:28:17 AM EST by TXGunnersM8]
1. Pens. Lots of pens. You're going to hand yours over so people can give written statements and not want them back a lot of the time.
2. Wet wipes
3. Clorox wipes
4. Hand sanitizer. I would buy a quart size pump a couple times a year.


Coming with a year in the jail, your personal interaction skills are probably on par with guys that have been on the road for a bit.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 12:29:44 AM EST
Just stay safe.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 12:57:39 AM EST
Learn how to write a good report. Such as make sure you articulate the elements of the crime.

Stay positive. It is so easy to become jaded with everything from BS calls, worthless admin, to the guy you arrested released within the hour.

Keep work at work. Some do it very well, others not so much. Find what works for you to decompress at the end off a shift and keep that shit away from your family.

As far as gear, a good seat organizer comes in handy.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 8:12:29 AM EST
I’m assuming they are putting you on an fto program. Listen to your fto and ask questions if you don’t understand something no matter how trivial it seems. If you haven’t refreshed yourself on your states criminal laws do so. It’s a terrible thing when an officer doesn’t know what they can and can’t do for enforcement. If you’re going to be on nights, then you need to get good eating and sleeping routines. If you are new to the area you need to study the maps and get to know the layout of your patrol area. It’s a bad feeling when you’re pursuing someone and you have know idea where you are when calling for help. Things look different at night vs daylight hours. Don’t cheap out on a good flashlight. Make it big enough with plenty of  lumens and enough weight that you can even use it as an emergency impact weapon/ window breaker/door stop.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 8:19:56 AM EST
Relax

Police work is almost all common sense.  

Treat people with respect.  Don't assume everyone is a "bad guy"

Remember your job is to protect and help people from other bad people.

If you don't get issued a body cam buy a cheap one yourself (if allowed)
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 8:22:34 AM EST
Don't let your politics [or your departments] get in the way of properly doing your job.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 12:03:49 PM EST
The best advice I can give you is don't take shortcuts. In time, you will learn where it's safe and acceptable to cut a corner and when not.

ANYTHING involving juveniles, the elderly, domestic violence, or sex crimes reported to you... write a report even if not required by law or policy, even if it's just a paragraph documenting what you were made aware of and what actions you took or didn't take.

There is a common saying... "don't sweat the little things"... completely not applicable to LE. My saying is if you sweat the little things you won't be bothered by the big things. If that makes no sense to you I can't help you.

Keep your personal affairs personal... despite people wearing a uniform, there are fucked up cops out there that cause drama. It's no ones business about your personal affairs.

At the end of the day... pause with no distractions, and rethink the day... was there anything that stood out? Did you do the right thing(s)? Can you go back and add to or improve something? Is there something that maybe you should mention to the boss, other officers? Sometimes after things stew for a while other thoughts or ideas will come to you... don't ignore those afterthoughts.  

Stay open-minded. Things will not always be as they seem. You WILL have times where you believe someone is lying and they are not and times where they are lying and you believe them. No shame in being tricked, it happens, what you do about it matters. Trust but verify is the saying. Open-minded critical thinking and constant analysis will guide you... avoid rushed decisions when not necessary.

On that note... do not take the job personal. What happens AFTER the arrest with the prosecutor or courts is not your concern as long as you had PC. Guys/gals who take this job personal are the ones who try to work around the system, make emotionally based decisions, and put more time in trying to make something out of nothing... the result, BAD DECISONS. Either you have it or you don't, don't try to make a situation into something. Criminals have to be lucky every time... we just need to be lucky onetime.  

Here is a saying my old boss told me when I got promoted...

You will spend half your time protecting the citizens from criminals and the other half protecting the citizens from other cops.

Some on here might not like the insinuation with this... that's ok. It's meant to remind supervisors and leaders that they need to be on guard as to what people under their charge are doing... to make sure the right things are being done. Eventually, if not already witnessed, you will experience a situation where this will make more sense.

Good luck and thanks for being willing to serve.



Link Posted: 1/7/2021 2:59:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/7/2021 3:14:42 PM EST by UnaStamus]
Use your skills to help you in your new job, but understand that you’re new and you’re at the bottom of the totem pole and your opinion doesn’t amount to jack.  The biggest problem we have with laterals is them going “back at ___ we did it this way”. Well, you’re here to do it OUR way.  We have to break some laterals of their habits because they’re not used to policing the way we do.  You’re there to learn how to police THEIR WAY, so give yourself over to their process.  If you know something is fucked up, just play the game and get through it.  Do it different when you’re on your own, so long as it’s the right thing to do.

Make sure you acknowledge openly that you’re the new guy, and act like it.  My first week on the road way back at my first agency, I was in the squad room writing a report when one of the most senior officers in the department walked in and handed me a bullhorn and told me to go put it downstairs in the equipment room.  I immediately got up and ran downstairs with it and put it in the equipment room.  A couple hours later I was in the car with my FTO and he told me that I scored some major points with the other officers by immediately doing that and knowing my place.  Just a game, but you gotta play it.

If you have a shit FTO, just deal with it.  When I lateraled to my current agency, I had more experience than half my FTOs.  One of them was a real prick who thought he was the shit.  I just played the game and found out at the end of my rotation with him that other officers all disliked him too, and that they gave me a lot of credit for just sucking it up and dealing with it.  This FTO trashed me to the FTO Sergeant, but she talked to other officers and knew that I wasn’t the problem and told me so.  

Don’t do stupid shit.  You still will, but keep it to a minimum and don’t do the same stupid thing twice in a row.  And if you do stupid shit, own it.  Admit to it and acknowledge what you have to do to not do it again.

Never ever EVER lie.  If you lie to your FTO or other officers, it will backfire and you’ll look like a fool and probably fail.  If you lie on a report or in court, you’ll quickly make the Brady/Giglio List and basically can’t do your job.  There’s a difference between acceptable lying to a citizen to achieve an end goal for public safety, and lying in general.  Do what you’re trained to do for the first part, but don’t do the second part.  Lying is especially a problem when you get graded/rated on your integrity by your FTO and supervisor.  It’s even more of a problem if your lying involves the cop version of stolen valor.  Don’t lie about who you are or what you’ve done.  

Officer safety is king.  The #1 quickest way to get washed out is to have horrible officer safety.  You’re not in a position to know what are acceptable risks and what aren’t, so err on the side of caution and your training officer until you understand your limitations.  On the street, you have different boundaries than in a jail. This concept of keeping everyone out of arms reach/tip-in distance works up until you can’t because you’re crammed into the bathroom of a restaurant, or the entryway of an apartment building.  Each agency has different standards for officer safety, so again this is a matter of learning what they expect.  I go by common sense, whereby criminals don’t get to put their hands in their pockets, but someone reporting their car stolen at their house can stick their hands wherever they want because it’s their house and they’re not a suspect.  HOWEVER, that can change the instant they become suspicious or hostile.  BUT, at the start of training we want recruits to always be mindful of hands until they get a feel for it, and act accordingly.  As a former FTO, and current fill-in part time FTO, I’m a stickler for officer safety.  My biggest areas of concern are communication (use your radio), situation awareness (where are you and what is going on), pat downs and searches (done appropriately and correctly), using backup when necessary (and WAITING for said backup when necessary), and WEARING YOUR SEATBELT.  Some FTOs don’t wear seatbelts and don’t enforce it. Our policy says we have to wear seatbelts, and they’ve saved several of my friends’ lives on the job, so I wear one and make my recruits wear one. They get one warning, and after that, the points start dropping for the routine and Code 3 driving grading.  

Driving safety is extremely important.  Remember that you can’t help anyone if you don’t get there.  Drive conscientiously.  Clear your intersections when driving Code 3, even if you have ROW.  Always try to see every car and predict what they’ll do.  People (other drivers) do really dumb shit when they see emergency lights.  For me, I lump this one in with officer safety quite a bit.  I once extended a recruit on his final plain-clothes phase for running a red light at full speed during a code run.  He claimed that he had no idea that he did it.  I had to replay the body and squad videos to show him, which made it even worse because it meant that either A. He was that fucking oblivious, B. He was on vapor lock and couldn’t handle the stress, or C. He was lying.  That video and incident went straight to the FTO sergeant and was one of the final straws that broke the camel’s back for getting him washed out and fired.  He was horrifically incompetent anyways.

If you run into something you don’t know, admit that you don’t know it and seek the answer.  Ask for help, and never be afraid to ask for help.  A post above talks about making sure you don’t do stupid shit that other officers do when they make bad enforcement decisions or bad arrests.  If you run into something and don’t know whether it’s illegal or allowed, or how to proceed, acknowledge that you don’t know, and then make it known that you will seek the answer.  As a citizen, I would rather an officer say “I don’t know, but I’ll find out for you” than to just bullshit me and talk out of their ass.  This goes with bad arrests where officers decide that something is illegal without actually knowing for a fact that it is.  Constitutionally, you have to err on the side of a citizen’s liberty first, so don’t just make a decision because you feel like it.

Don’t get caught up in video traps.  By that I mean cell phone or surveillance video.  Don’t fall for the CopBlock bullshit or the “First Amendment auditors” who will try to bait you.  Cameras are everywhere anyways.  Know your laws and policies.  Err on the side of their rights, balanced with officer safety.  If they approach you to challenge you, give the information you’re mandated to disclose when asked like name/badge number, but then don’t get drawn in.  Ignore them.  Or suck up your ego and leave.  Live to fight another day and you’ll look better when they post it on the internet or social media to bolster their ego while their mom makes them some meatloaf.  Know that as a cop, EVERYONE is always watching you.

Talk to people like they’re people.  And talk to people like you’re a person and not some automaton.  You probably know this from being in the jail, but talking to people like they’re another person goes a long way, and you can see definite shifts in behavior and attitude when you suddenly become authoritarian towards people.  There’s a time to be that robotic authority cop, and that’s not when you’re trying to mediate a domestic dispute, answer citizen questions or calm down a Karen.

Make a decision.  Be decisive.  One of the main reasons recruits wash out is because they can’t make decisions under stress.  At first, wrong decisions are fine so long as they’re made.  We can correct the end result, but we don’t want to have to correct the process.  When I first started, my FTO had me do traffic stops to get me comfortable with them.  I would sit in my squad trying to decide for minutes whether I wanted to ticket the person each time, and my FTO would ask me if I was going to ticket the guy, and I would say “I don’t know.”  He finally put his foot down and said “Does this person deserve a ticket for what they did?”  I would have difficulty answering sometimes, and in retrospect it was because I wasn’t sure whether I would get in trouble for not writing a ticket.  The ticket didn’t matter and never did matter- it was all about making the decision.  My FTO finally said “Are you 100% certain you want to ticket this person?”  No.  “Then don’t ticket them.  If you’re not 100% sold that they need to be ticketed, then don’t.  It’s just an equipment/moving violation, not murder.”  Suddenly I was a lot more at ease about it.

If you opt to spend 15 minutes trying to talk someone out of making a 5 minute report, you didn’t use your time wisely.
Link Posted: 1/7/2021 7:18:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/7/2021 7:18:51 PM EST by ThatGuy91K]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By UnaStamus:
Use your skills to help you in your new job, but understand that you’re new and you’re at the bottom of the totem pole and your opinion doesn’t amount to jack.  The biggest problem we have with laterals is them going “back at ___ we did it this way”. Well, you’re here to do it OUR way.  We have to break some laterals of their habits because they’re not used to policing the way we do.  You’re there to learn how to police THEIR WAY, so give yourself over to their process.  If you know something is fucked up, just play the game and get through it.  Do it different when you’re on your own, so long as it’s the right thing to do.

Make sure you acknowledge openly that you’re the new guy, and act like it.  My first week on the road way back at my first agency, I was in the squad room writing a report when one of the most senior officers in the department walked in and handed me a bullhorn and told me to go put it downstairs in the equipment room.  I immediately got up and ran downstairs with it and put it in the equipment room.  A couple hours later I was in the car with my FTO and he told me that I scored some major points with the other officers by immediately doing that and knowing my place.  Just a game, but you gotta play it.

If you have a shit FTO, just deal with it.  When I lateraled to my current agency, I had more experience than half my FTOs.  One of them was a real prick who thought he was the shit.  I just played the game and found out at the end of my rotation with him that other officers all disliked him too, and that they gave me a lot of credit for just sucking it up and dealing with it.  This FTO trashed me to the FTO Sergeant, but she talked to other officers and knew that I wasn’t the problem and told me so.  

Don’t do stupid shit.  You still will, but keep it to a minimum and don’t do the same stupid thing twice in a row.  And if you do stupid shit, own it.  Admit to it and acknowledge what you have to do to not do it again.

Never ever EVER lie.  If you lie to your FTO or other officers, it will backfire and you’ll look like a fool and probably fail.  If you lie on a report or in court, you’ll quickly make the Brady/Giglio List and basically can’t do your job.  There’s a difference between acceptable lying to a citizen to achieve an end goal for public safety, and lying in general.  Do what you’re trained to do for the first part, but don’t do the second part.  Lying is especially a problem when you get graded/rated on your integrity by your FTO and supervisor.  It’s even more of a problem if your lying involves the cop version of stolen valor.  Don’t lie about who you are or what you’ve done.  

Officer safety is king.  The #1 quickest way to get washed out is to have horrible officer safety.  You’re not in a position to know what are acceptable risks and what aren’t, so err on the side of caution and your training officer until you understand your limitations.  On the street, you have different boundaries than in a jail. This concept of keeping everyone out of arms reach/tip-in distance works up until you can’t because you’re crammed into the bathroom of a restaurant, or the entryway of an apartment building.  Each agency has different standards for officer safety, so again this is a matter of learning what they expect.  I go by common sense, whereby criminals don’t get to put their hands in their pockets, but someone reporting their car stolen at their house can stick their hands wherever they want because it’s their house and they’re not a suspect.  HOWEVER, that can change the instant they become suspicious or hostile.  BUT, at the start of training we want recruits to always be mindful of hands until they get a feel for it, and act accordingly.  As a former FTO, and current fill-in part time FTO, I’m a stickler for officer safety.  My biggest areas of concern are communication (use your radio), situation awareness (where are you and what is going on), pat downs and searches (done appropriately and correctly), using backup when necessary (and WAITING for said backup when necessary), and WEARING YOUR SEATBELT.  Some FTOs don’t wear seatbelts and don’t enforce it. Our policy says we have to wear seatbelts, and they’ve saved several of my friends’ lives on the job, so I wear one and make my recruits wear one. They get one warning, and after that, the points start dropping for the routine and Code 3 driving grading.  

Driving safety is extremely important.  Remember that you can’t help anyone if you don’t get there.  Drive conscientiously.  Clear your intersections when driving Code 3, even if you have ROW.  Always try to see every car and predict what they’ll do.  People (other drivers) do really dumb shit when they see emergency lights.  For me, I lump this one in with officer safety quite a bit.  I once extended a recruit on his final plain-clothes phase for running a red light at full speed during a code run.  He claimed that he had no idea that he did it.  I had to replay the body and squad videos to show him, which made it even worse because it meant that either A. He was that fucking oblivious, B. He was on vapor lock and couldn’t handle the stress, or C. He was lying.  That video and incident went straight to the FTO sergeant and was one of the final straws that broke the camel’s back for getting him washed out and fired.  He was horrifically incompetent anyways.

If you run into something you don’t know, admit that you don’t know it and seek the answer.  Ask for help, and never be afraid to ask for help.  A post above talks about making sure you don’t do stupid shit that other officers do when they make bad enforcement decisions or bad arrests.  If you run into something and don’t know whether it’s illegal or allowed, or how to proceed, acknowledge that you don’t know, and then make it known that you will seek the answer.  As a citizen, I would rather an officer say “I don’t know, but I’ll find out for you” than to just bullshit me and talk out of their ass.  This goes with bad arrests where officers decide that something is illegal without actually knowing for a fact that it is.  Constitutionally, you have to err on the side of a citizen’s liberty first, so don’t just make a decision because you feel like it.

Don’t get caught up in video traps.  By that I mean cell phone or surveillance video.  Don’t fall for the CopBlock bullshit or the “First Amendment auditors” who will try to bait you.  Cameras are everywhere anyways.  Know your laws and policies.  Err on the side of their rights, balanced with officer safety.  If they approach you to challenge you, give the information you’re mandated to disclose when asked like name/badge number, but then don’t get drawn in.  Ignore them.  Or suck up your ego and leave.  Live to fight another day and you’ll look better when they post it on the internet or social media to bolster their ego while their mom makes them some meatloaf.  Know that as a cop, EVERYONE is always watching you.

Talk to people like they’re people.  And talk to people like you’re a person and not some automaton.  You probably know this from being in the jail, but talking to people like they’re another person goes a long way, and you can see definite shifts in behavior and attitude when you suddenly become authoritarian towards people.  There’s a time to be that robotic authority cop, and that’s not when you’re trying to mediate a domestic dispute, answer citizen questions or calm down a Karen.

Make a decision.  Be decisive.  One of the main reasons recruits wash out is because they can’t make decisions under stress.  At first, wrong decisions are fine so long as they’re made.  We can correct the end result, but we don’t want to have to correct the process.  When I first started, my FTO had me do traffic stops to get me comfortable with them.  I would sit in my squad trying to decide for minutes whether I wanted to ticket the person each time, and my FTO would ask me if I was going to ticket the guy, and I would say “I don’t know.”  He finally put his foot down and said “Does this person deserve a ticket for what they did?”  I would have difficulty answering sometimes, and in retrospect it was because I wasn’t sure whether I would get in trouble for not writing a ticket.  The ticket didn’t matter and never did matter- it was all about making the decision.  My FTO finally said “Are you 100% certain you want to ticket this person?”  No.  “Then don’t ticket them.  If you’re not 100% sold that they need to be ticketed, then don’t.  It’s just an equipment/moving violation, not murder.”  Suddenly I was a lot more at ease about it.

If you opt to spend 15 minutes trying to talk someone out of making a 5 minute report, you didn’t use your time wisely.
View Quote


Read everything this guy said again, because all of it is spot on.

My two cents as a former FTO and now FTO coordinator, if you aren't already studying penal code, transportation code and department policy, you should be. If you don't spend your off time studying those, your should. If you have those memorized verbatim and can recite them at the drop of a hat, good for you now start reading case law.

Unless you grew up in the area and know it like the back of your hand, orientation is one of the biggest issues I see recruits struggle with. Studying and using your map is fine, but on your off days drive your beat in your personal time. I'd pull up a realtor app, find an address and drive to it to help me learn the streets. Sometimes I'd load the wife up and she'd go with me. She always enjoyed it.

While in training, life is going to be extremely stressful. Don't make plans or commitments and add to the stress. Talk to your wife about it. If you communicate the stress of what your about to do, she will understand and hopefully take some of the family burden off of you.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 3:08:16 AM EST
Some good advise has been posted already.

When you start your new job....if someone comes up to you and welcomes you and tells you to come to them for anything...smile and thank that person....then avoid them. That person is the agency problem and he/she has alienated everyone else and is looking for a new friend....and they will eventually fuck you too if you allow them to get close to you. The best deputies will be kind of stand offish at first because they are sizing you up. Don’t take it personally. It’s a good thing. Your agency may not be big enough for that to be an issue.....but there’s a good chance at least one person there is like that.

Don’t take things personally with the public. No crime? Walk away. Some people will piss you off and sometimes they will pull one over on you. Don’t let it bother you....just shrug your shoulders and leave. Best thing that happened to me in this job was getting to the point that very few things bothered me. Only thing that bothers me any more is when I deal with a true victim....especially women and children. You’re just a victim of your own stupidity? Yeah don’t give a shit. Your suffering makes me smile.  

Annoying obnoxious ass wants to initiate a confrontation? Laugh and walk away. I dealt with one of those 1st Amendment Auditor types recently. I actually tried to talk to him thinking he was someone we were waiting for. Once I realized he was a dipshit, I told him “oh you are one of THOSE people” and I walked off. He started yelling at me trying to get me to come back and talk to him. I walked off laughing about what an idiot he was. The whole squad got a good laugh about him later.

Don’t die for stupid reasons. Few years ago I made a stop for speeding. Car reeked of fresh MJ. Driver was a BM who had gang affiliations and a history of violence. I checked the MDT screen and there was no one available to come assist me. Shift was short handed and all on important calls. I sat there for at least a minute staring at the car. I asked myself.....is MJ worth your life? I decided the answer was no and let the guy go with a citation. I didn’t like it but decided it wasn’t worth my life. There is a good chance he had other drugs and weapons in the car.  But, he walked that day. It has always annoyed me but I believe I made the right decision. For the OP.....you really have to think about that. You’ll be working remotely and with little back up and what you have is probably far away. Make wise decisions and don’t let your ego walk you to your death.

People do die in this job in the line of duty. Decide what you are willing to die for. There are things in this world that are worth dying for.

Get to know the decent folks in your patrol area. They can be one of your best assets and sources of info. Nothing wrong with stopping in the local convenience store and spending some time bullshitting with the locals. This job isn’t just about finding bad guys and not everyone you talk to is a bad guy. Learn who the good people are. Smile at people and be friendly. Not everyone is out to kill you. But, always be cautious around people who give you a bad feeling and never trust a drug or alcohol impaired person.



Link Posted: 1/8/2021 3:12:36 AM EST
Some good advice here. Stay safe
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 3:49:15 AM EST
You will need to find out what your department wants you to do with suicidal people. However, the general consensus in LE is don’t risk yourself to save a suicidal person. If the person won’t come out to go to a mental commit, leave. If they off themselves, you just have to arrange for the mess cleanup.  America loves suicide and we have a LOT of it. It’s never been more common than now and it’s getting worse. I offer help but if it’s denied and I’m unable to safely get you detained for an involuntary commit, then I no longer care and we leave. We aren’t going to get goaded into killing you for you. If you want to kill yourself, go ahead. You won’t save the world and you won’t save all the suicidal people. I’ve seen officers save a person from suicide and they feel good......until the person kills themselves a few weeks later. If you can help a suicidal person....that’s nice but don’t risk yourself to save them from themselves.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 9:26:54 AM EST
Lots of good info here.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 3:08:59 PM EST
I am very impressed with the thoughtful and thorough amount of good advise here in this thread.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 10:02:41 PM EST
Get the fuck out while you can.  Find a job where you won't get politically prosecuted for doing your job.  It is not worth it.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 11:10:33 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dwb1987:
Get the fuck out while you can.  Find a job where you won't get politically prosecuted for doing your job.  It is not worth it.
View Quote




There are areas of the country that aren’t full of dipshits. Don’t let GD here fool you. There actually are decent places to work in LE still. Very few of them are in big cities though!
Link Posted: 1/9/2021 7:47:29 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
There actually are decent places to work in LE still. Very few of them are in big cities though!
View Quote
Where are the decent places to work that pay more than $22/hour? That's what I want to know.

Lots of great advice in this thread.
Link Posted: 1/9/2021 11:33:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/9/2021 11:38:18 AM EST by ColtRifle]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KitBuilder:
Where are the decent places to work that pay more than $22/hour? That's what I want to know.

Lots of great advice in this thread.
View Quote




Find a conservative area and then look at cost of living. In some places, $22 per hr is below poverty. In other places it’s a decent living.

Most people who are looking for police jobs (or any job for that matter) only look at the dollar amount they will get paid. One should always look at cost of living and overall job and location satisfaction. Then, one should also look at side benefits. Things like take home cars may be worth quite a bit of money (or be a liability in some areas). Off duty and overtime opportunities can be pretty lucrative in some areas too.
Link Posted: 1/9/2021 3:58:32 PM EST
Don’t dwell on the little bullshit. You are going to have times with whichever agency you work for throughout your career that you are getting fucked with from above and most of those times you need to let it go and pick your battles. It happens to everyone. For whatever reason in this line of work we tend to eat our own so be cautious how you proceed when that happens, otherwise blow it off and don’t sweat the small stuff. (And most stuff is small stuff)
Link Posted: 1/9/2021 4:04:57 PM EST
Don't be a dick.
Link Posted: 1/9/2021 4:11:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By nimrod3316:
Just stay safe.
View Quote


This
Link Posted: 1/9/2021 4:39:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/9/2021 4:40:43 PM EST by SteelonSteel]
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Originally Posted By Dc204:
Don’t dwell on the little bullshit. You are going to have times with whichever agency you work for throughout your career that you are getting fucked with from above and most of those times you need to let it go and pick your battles. It happens to everyone. For whatever reason in this line of work we tend to eat our own so be cautious how you proceed when that happens, otherwise blow it off and don’t sweat the small stuff. (And most stuff is small stuff)
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My neighbor is a few years older than me.  He gave me that speach even though he was a power company guy and I was LE.  Don’t get get caught up on the stuff he said.  The stuf being, the pain in the neck bureaucratic crap, the stupid nonsensical required PC training etc.  Its just stuff, remember why you are there and that the stuff will always be there.  Put it in its place.  



Oh my words of wisdom......keep a full roll of TP in a zip lock bag under your seat if you are working really rural.

Link Posted: 1/10/2021 11:13:12 AM EST
A lot of good advice here but I can add a few general pearls that I learned over my career and stuff that I would tell my guys when I was a Boss.  I'll try not to repeat too much what others have already said.

Never drive in a way or do something that you would cite or arrest someone else for doing.

Try to treat the public like you would want your family to be treated.  As a cop you deal with people every day.  You move on and forget about them.  Remember that the general public has interactions with police very few times in their life and that is usually during a stressful situation.  It's a big thing for them and they remember if you're an asshole or if you treated them with respect.

If you make a traffic stop and something doesn't seem right there is nothing wrong with leaving.  Turn the overheads off and drive away.  Especially in a rural area with no backup available.

Take advantage of a bathroom every chance you get.  Nothing worse than being on a crime scene or accident scene with a full bladder.

Years ago during training I was told that 90% of a cop's stress comes from his agency, not the public.  True.  There are things you will have absolutely no control over.  Try not to worry about them.  Instead make the little bubble you do have control over the best you can for yourself and the guys you work with.

I could keep going but most of it's already been said.  Have fun and stay safe.
Link Posted: 1/10/2021 5:21:05 PM EST
I've been in the jail for almost a year.  I start the academy on Thursday.  Thanks for all the info in this thread.
Link Posted: 1/11/2021 1:03:47 AM EST
Too much good stuff here to individually address at the moment, just wanted to thank you all for some really solid advice and experience.
Link Posted: 1/11/2021 4:36:16 AM EST
There has been some very good advice that’s been given here.  Not only would I suggest you heed it,  I would print it out and keep it with me.  Take every advantage of any training opportunities that become available.  Not just the tactical type stuff, but criminal procedure for law enforcement,  civil liabilities for law enforcement,  elements of crimes,  etc, etc, etc.  
I’ll give you some small tips, because all the best stuff has been posted above.  Always know where you are.  Shit can happen in a split second and you’re gonna need help. Be able to give your location over the radio at the drop of a hat.  If you are in a foot chase, the first words out your mouth should be giving radio your location and direction of travel.  2nd words should be a description of the suspect.  Everyone will know that you are in a foot chase by your breathing.  Try to be clear in your communication with radio and responding units.  Listen to the radio.  Get to know the voices of other units.  Might not be a problem where you’re at,  but if you work on a watch with 40 other cops,  you need to do this.  I don’t see this as being a problem with where you’re gonna be.  Don’t back yourself into a corner with stupid shit, like if you don’t do this I’m gonna lock you up, with no criminal violation.  Pissing off the police was a crime in my day, 70-s to 80-s.  Don’t do this!  Also,  don’t become part of someone else’s problem.  For example,  you’re backing someone up,  and they beat the dog snot out of someone, and they want you to corroborate some bullshit cover story, DON’T DO IT.  Find stable, competent officers to watch, and learn from them.  Avoid the hot dogs like the Covid virus or an std laden slut.  And like someone said above, someone is watching everything you do.  One thing I always tried to go by was,  I’m not gonna get cold, wet, or hungry.  You will suffer from all three of these.  Try to mitigate these.  You’ll be living out of that car.  At least I was.  Carry water, snacks, and maybe an extra pair of shoes-dry socks.  All I have for now.
Link Posted: 1/11/2021 5:45:33 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/11/2021 5:46:51 AM EST by K9-Bob]
To act justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly.





Link Posted: 1/11/2021 9:50:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/11/2021 9:53:59 AM EST by 1245xx]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By K9-Bob:
To act justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly.





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This. And don't go all the time to places that offer cops free food or %50 off.  Ive have had restaurant owners complaining to me that we give the beat cop %50 off, or free food, then we had state troopers showing up from the capital wanting 50 off or free food. Fucking douches.  I called the governor's to put a stop to that. I was the beat cop. Well, watch commander,  and i paid for for full price in tip. I can walk in there today and not pay a dime. I pay full price plus 20 or 30 percent.
Link Posted: 1/11/2021 6:07:06 PM EST
Be aware you will likely be treated as an outsider there and see some very different applications of traditional LE. I worked a rural station that was agricultural and it was a culture shock, two deputies for about 400 square miles. Had beat partners that would drive home people I arrested once they were released from jail, was the usual suspects, nearly every crime was committed by the same 6-10 people, everyone knew or was related to everyone else. Just keep your head low and learn the community and what is expected there ditch all preconceived notions and keep and open mind. Good luck
Link Posted: 1/11/2021 6:42:47 PM EST
I can't give you any actual work-related advice, but I just wanted to say good luck, and stay safe out there, brother!

Link Posted: 1/12/2021 6:45:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/12/2021 6:54:06 AM EST by hodgescl]
Be nice until it’s time to not be nice. Kindness and professionalism can go a long way sometimes, and help you out later.

Remember names. People will remember yours.


Always know where you are, right now. Constantly look at road signs and mailboxes. Say them out loud if you want to.

If you need help right now, can you tell someone where you are.

Learn how to read a paper map and use a compass, it sounds weird but it helps with staying oriented and using gps systems too.

Study your jurisdiction, break it down into a grid and study the main roads, back roads and everything in between. Also know what the borders are, and study what’s just beyond them.
Link Posted: 1/12/2021 4:27:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/12/2021 4:28:13 PM EST by rogueboss]
Always watch hands.
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