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Link Posted: 11/26/2020 9:19:06 PM EST
As-received counter, still in plastic wrap.  

The packaging saved the wood from massive handling damage - cardboard box was badly ripped in many places.



Similar shot after several coats of tung oil.


The "bowling alley" shot.



Link Posted: 11/30/2020 1:07:32 AM EST
Trouble today -

I finished the first counter and set it aside to start its curing.  

I also finished the bottom of the second counter.  

When I flipped it over, I ran into some trouble - a deep linear dent on the top surface of the counter.  The wood fibers were cut/broken.

Something heavy and hard and with a sharp bottom edge had been dropped onto the surface.  It probably took a bounce, too, as there are two distinct dents.

They tried to sand out the dent while it was still at the factory.  It was too deep (1/16") to sand it out without resurfacing and thinning the entire counter top.

They decided to pack it and ship it anyway and let the consumer deal with it.

I know it did not happen in transit as there was no damage to the cardboard wrap or the plastic wrap over the board.  

1.  This happened at the factory.  
2.  They knew it was there.  
3.  They shipped it anyway.

How about that for a quality supplier???

Yes, Home Depot took it back even though the bottom, ends and sides had been oiled.

No, they did not accuse me of doing it.  

Yes, I ordered a replacement from Home Depot.

It has set me back by TWO WEEKS while I await delivery of the replacement.  It has placed my entire plan in jeopardy.  

I'd planned to install them over the Christmas-New Year holiday shut down when I am off work.  Now, the oil finish will not be cured in time.

It is the counter with the sink and faucet.  

I am in deep schedule trouble.

Link Posted: 12/1/2020 2:05:18 AM EST
Home Depot emailed me.  The replacement will be ready for pick up this Thursday.  That makes me VERY happy.

I will be inspecting the counter before I leave the store - both sides.  
Link Posted: 12/1/2020 3:48:18 AM EST
Tag for finished pics
Link Posted: 12/5/2020 2:09:23 AM EST
I picked up the new counter tonight.

The outer cardboard is in bad shape but I'm still hopeful the wood inside is fine.  I'll know more tomorrow.

If it is okay, I lost a week.  If it also has to go back,...
Link Posted: 12/5/2020 2:14:50 AM EST
The rags I used to oil the top of the first counter have been outside and have pretty well cured - they've lost all flexibility.  That's a good sign of progress for that counter.  The rags are my "cure sample" for that top.

Guys, let me remind you of your fire safety training as a kid.  Remember, they used to say, "Oily rags can spontaneously combust."  Tung oil and linseed oil are the types of oils they were referring to in those films.  Used rags go outside spread out to dry.  Don't pile them up.  Don't put them in a plastic trash can until they are fully cured.
Link Posted: 12/5/2020 5:27:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/5/2020 5:35:49 PM EST by Trollslayer]
Well, the box for the new counter was totally ravaged.  

The counter top inside wasn't too bad but had some dents in the edge.  

I decided to try steaming them out before returning the top.  There were no broken fibers, so I was fairly certain it would work and it did.  

There were two sizable dents in this edge.  One can still be seen.  The other is gone.  

If you look carefully, beneath the glove's finger, on the bottom edge, you can see a hint of the dent.

Link Posted: 12/5/2020 5:32:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/5/2020 5:35:07 PM EST by Trollslayer]
These show how badly the box was damaged.  





Link Posted: 12/5/2020 5:38:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/5/2020 5:38:59 PM EST by Trollslayer]
I would have to say that the freight company and Home Depot are not prepared to safely ship these.

Alternatively, they are not packaged well enough to prevent damage.  

They are well packaged but not well enough for the mistreatment they receive.
Link Posted: 12/5/2020 10:49:43 PM EST
This is looking awesome!
Link Posted: 12/12/2020 3:35:09 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/15/2020 2:02:36 AM EST by Trollslayer]
I finished oiling the second, larger counter top.

The oiling was super-easy to do.  It's the cure time that has me bugged - 2 weeks to a month to cure.  Still, it is a beautiful finish.

Tung oil is a product from and for a different era, an era when 30 days to cure was reasonable.  Of course, that is why I am finishing now yet not installing until during our Christmas break.  

Oh well, while I wait, I ordered the sink and related plumbing goodies.

Link Posted: 12/12/2020 2:43:25 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:
The rags I used to oil the top of the first counter have been outside and have pretty well cured - they've lost all flexibility.  That's a good sign of progress for that counter.  The rags are my "cure sample" for that top.

Guys, let me remind you of your fire safety training as a kid.  Remember, they used to say, "Oily rags can spontaneously combust."  Tung oil and linseed oil are the types of oils they were referring to in those films.  Used rags go outside spread out to dry.  Don't pile them up.  Don't put them in a plastic trash can until they are fully cured.
View Quote
Yup, no joke!  Buddy at work lost his Expedition as his box of old rags decided to ignite by themselves that he had temporarily placed in the back, that suv went up quick.
Link Posted: 12/13/2020 8:19:58 AM EST
Big dittos on the oily rag caution!
My father almost lost his small shop to them.
We caught it in time and no serious damage.
Had he not gone back out that evening to turn off the lights it would have been gone.
Ever since they go outside or are put in the woodstove and burned.
Nice looking counters OP, Waiting for more foto updates..
Link Posted: 12/13/2020 12:56:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/13/2020 1:02:47 PM EST by Trollslayer]
I've been keeping my used rags outdoors.  I think the best thing to do is to burn them.  

I keep my applicator/dauber in a sealed zip lock bag.  One day, I reached in to get it and it was warm; not hot, not threatening but more than room temperature.  

The counters have been set aside to cure.  It's been pretty cold of late (45 F low, 65 F high).  I would think that's got to affect the rate of curing, slowing it down.

There's still a couple of weeks to go before demolition and installation happen.
Link Posted: 12/13/2020 1:13:50 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/13/2020 3:13:50 PM EST by Trollslayer]
The sink installation instructions show the use of a jig saw to cut the opening.  

That doesn't seem credible for cutting through 1 1/2" thick maple (blade deflection/bending).

I was thinking of making the long, straight cuts by plunging and cutting with my circular saw.  I suppose I could cut around the corners with the jig saw.

Any other ideas?
Link Posted: 12/13/2020 1:18:46 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:
The sink installation instructions show the use of a jig saw to cut the opening.  

That doesn't seem credible for cutting through 1 1/2" thick maple (balde deflection/bending).

I was thinking of making the long, straight cuts by plunging and cutting with my circular saw.  I suppose I could cut around the corners with the jig saw.

Any other ideas?
View Quote


Jig saw with a suitable length and teeth spacing should be fine.

You will have to go slow.
Hole saws and a portable circular saw can also work.
Link Posted: 12/13/2020 3:15:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/13/2020 3:18:50 PM EST by Trollslayer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Hole saws ... can also work.
View Quote


That's a great idea for the corners.  I have several.  Thanks for that.

I was also thinking about a 1/2" end mill bit in my plunge router running inside a fence.  

It would leave a nice clean cut.  

Ever done that?
Link Posted: 12/14/2020 2:54:29 AM EST
Are you doing an undermount?

I just used a jig saw for mine and since it was an overmount.
Link Posted: 12/14/2020 11:54:17 AM EST
The sink is a drop-in.
Link Posted: 12/18/2020 12:06:49 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Jig saw with a suitable length and teeth spacing should be fine.
View Quote


Any recommendations on teeth spacing, length and blade speed (my jig saw is variable speed) would be welcome.
Link Posted: 12/26/2020 1:44:50 AM EST
Demolition starts tomorrow.  
Link Posted: 12/26/2020 2:15:34 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:
The sink is a drop-in.
View Quote


Drop in, as in it has a rim that sits on top of the counter? If so, the cut doesn't have to be perfect. I'd use a circular saw for the long cuts and a jigsaw for the corners in this case.

If you mean drop in like a farmers sink or undermount then it is critical the lines are straight and clean. I'd make a template out of 1/4" MDF which is easy to cut and shape to make perfect. Rough gut the hole 1/8" undersized, then use a router with a top bearing pattern bit to clean up the cut. I'd put a 1/8" radius round over around the edge.
Link Posted: 12/27/2020 1:00:32 PM EST
cut on the small side. you can always make the cutout bigger.
Link Posted: 12/28/2020 5:56:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/28/2020 8:30:00 PM EST by Trollslayer]
The old counter and backslash are out.  

HOLY SHIT!

For example, there was a grand total of TWO drywall screws holding the entire 12 feet of counter top in place and they were both on the same end.

The wall behind the backsplash,... why did they do that?

I am too embarrassed to post photos.  I'll wait until the new stuff is in.
Link Posted: 12/28/2020 9:36:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/28/2020 9:39:46 PM EST by gillplate]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:


That's a great idea for the corners.  I have several.  Thanks for that.

I was also thinking about a 1/2" end mill bit in my plunge router running inside a fence.  

It would leave a nice clean cut.  

Ever done that?
View Quote

You could rough cut your counter top slightly undersized with a jig saw.
Then make a plywood template with cheap 1/2" plywood and use double side tape to affix it to your counter top.
Use a top bearing template bit  in your router to make your final cut nice and neat. (you may need a couple different lengths)
Just go slow with router, no more than 1/4" depth of cut per pass.

Link Posted: 12/28/2020 10:53:52 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:
The old counter and backslash are out.  

HOLY SHIT!

For example, there was a grand total of TWO drywall screws holding the entire 12 feet of counter top in place and they were both on the same end.

The wall behind the backsplash,... why did they do that?

I am too embarrassed to post photos.  I'll wait until the new stuff is in.
View Quote


No need to be embarrassed at the hack job someone else did. Post pics.

One nice thing about hack jobs is they are easy to tear apart.
Link Posted: 12/28/2020 10:54:36 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gillplate:

You could rough cut your counter top slightly undersized with a jig saw.
Then make a plywood template with cheap 1/2" plywood and use double side tape to affix it to your counter top.
Use a top bearing template bit  in your router to make your final cut nice and neat. (you may need a couple different lengths)
Just go slow with router, no more than 1/4" depth of cut per pass.

https://i.imgur.com/Jg7bpvn.jpg
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gillplate:
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:


That's a great idea for the corners.  I have several.  Thanks for that.

I was also thinking about a 1/2" end mill bit in my plunge router running inside a fence.  

It would leave a nice clean cut.  

Ever done that?

You could rough cut your counter top slightly undersized with a jig saw.
Then make a plywood template with cheap 1/2" plywood and use double side tape to affix it to your counter top.
Use a top bearing template bit  in your router to make your final cut nice and neat. (you may need a couple different lengths)
Just go slow with router, no more than 1/4" depth of cut per pass.

https://i.imgur.com/Jg7bpvn.jpg


See my post, a few posts up.
Link Posted: 12/28/2020 10:56:38 PM EST
OST for the finished kitchen

I hope things go easier, OP
Link Posted: 12/30/2020 6:52:05 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By A_G:


See my post, a few posts up.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By A_G:
Originally Posted By gillplate:
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:


That's a great idea for the corners.  I have several.  Thanks for that.

I was also thinking about a 1/2" end mill bit in my plunge router running inside a fence.  

It would leave a nice clean cut.  

Ever done that?

You could rough cut your counter top slightly undersized with a jig saw.
Then make a plywood template with cheap 1/2" plywood and use double side tape to affix it to your counter top.
Use a top bearing template bit  in your router to make your final cut nice and neat. (you may need a couple different lengths)
Just go slow with router, no more than 1/4" depth of cut per pass.

https://i.imgur.com/Jg7bpvn.jpg


See my post, a few posts up.

Missed it.

I agree on the roundover.
Link Posted: 12/30/2020 7:50:36 PM EST
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:
I'm going to be putting in butcher block counters.


On one, I'll have a 45 degree miter cut to go around an inside corner.  

I'm going with a butt joint, instead.


Anyone ever done this?  Would you care to share any lessons learned?

How did you close the seam?

How did you keep the top surfaces co-planar/aligned?

How did you make the sink cut out?

Any other tips on how to do this?

If you've done it, would you do it again?
View Quote
I put it on the island because we use it so much (not for food prep). Maintenance headache. Can't imagine it on main counter tops.
Link Posted: 12/30/2020 10:32:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/30/2020 10:54:35 PM EST by Trollslayer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By usmcmp:
I put it on the island because we use it so much (not for food prep). Maintenance headache. Can't imagine it on main counter tops.
View Quote


I hope you are wrong but I know you are right.  If the new counters don't work out, we can always upgrade.  I'm thinking Silastone but who knows.  The new wooden counter tops cost a total of $600, including the tung oil.  

These are a few examples of what was under the old countertop and backslash.  I am ashamed it was in my house.





Why this board was cut is beyond my understanding (see photo below).  Then, to leave it dangling,...???



Link Posted: 12/31/2020 12:40:12 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:


I hope you are wrong but I know you are right.  If the new counters don't work out, we can always upgrade.  I'm thinking Silastone but who knows.  The new wooden counter tops cost a total of $600, including the tung oil.  

These are a few examples of what was under the old countertop and backslash.  I am ashamed it was in my house.

https://i.ibb.co/1fVxG3b/IMG-0569-1.jpg

https://i.ibb.co/FDLkwr6/IMG-0570-1.jpg

Why this board was cut is beyond my understanding (see photo below).  Then, to leave it dangling,...???

https://i.ibb.co/M91hwYs/IMG-0568-1.jpg

https://i.ibb.co/2sDWRSj/IMG-0565-1.jpg
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:
Originally Posted By usmcmp:
I put it on the island because we use it so much (not for food prep). Maintenance headache. Can't imagine it on main counter tops.


I hope you are wrong but I know you are right.  If the new counters don't work out, we can always upgrade.  I'm thinking Silastone but who knows.  The new wooden counter tops cost a total of $600, including the tung oil.  

These are a few examples of what was under the old countertop and backslash.  I am ashamed it was in my house.

https://i.ibb.co/1fVxG3b/IMG-0569-1.jpg

https://i.ibb.co/FDLkwr6/IMG-0570-1.jpg

Why this board was cut is beyond my understanding (see photo below).  Then, to leave it dangling,...???

https://i.ibb.co/M91hwYs/IMG-0568-1.jpg

https://i.ibb.co/2sDWRSj/IMG-0565-1.jpg


No need to be ashamed. Hack jobs like this are all over the country. Usually done by homeowners who don't know any better, are cheapskates, or get in over their heads. Of course, the previous owners could have paid someone to do the job, and he did this.

After buying my first (and current) house, I learned that it's far better to buy a fixer and fix it yourself not only because things can be done right, but for other reasons like lower taxes, easier refinancing, etc.
Link Posted: 1/2/2021 3:04:25 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/9/2021 9:15:34 PM EST by Trollslayer]
The counters are just plopped down for a fit check.  The butt joint came out A-Okay!  More work tomorrow.



We'll be doing some version of a white subway tile for the backsplash.

Link Posted: 1/2/2021 9:42:52 AM EST
Nice look!
Link Posted: 1/2/2021 9:16:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/2/2021 9:17:55 PM EST by Trollslayer]
Thank you, the color scheme is by my wife and daughter.  The tile will be 4"X8" white, wavy surface porcelain.

Here's an update.  Yes, I am slow.


Link Posted: 1/4/2021 8:32:28 AM EST
It looks nice.  Some time this winter I hope to build a bar height butcher block small kitchen table/food prep island type thing.  I wasn't sure if I wanted to try to build the butcher block or purchase it, but if I purchase it, my research seemed to point me towards Home Depot for the cheapest top.  I appreciated all the previous posters adding their experiences.
Link Posted: 1/9/2021 9:22:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/12/2021 11:54:58 AM EST by Trollslayer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Buckshot4U:
It looks nice.  Some time this winter I hope to build a bar height butcher block small kitchen table/food prep island type thing.  I wasn't sure if I wanted to try to build the butcher block or purchase it, but if I purchase it, my research seemed to point me towards Home Depot for the cheapest top.  I appreciated all the previous posters adding their experiences.
View Quote



Thank you, the counter installation is almost but not quite done.

Home Depot may be inexpensive but they are special orders with a long delivery delay.  

Also, I have to advise you to inspect your top carefully.  They DO NOT have a system in place to deliver these tops to the consumer without damaging the top.  

They will take back a damaged top but you have to go get it, unpack it and inspect it.  Then, if it's damaged you have to load it back into your vehicle and drive over there.

They will then order a replacement with another delivery delay (mine were 1-2 weeks).

There is a very high likelihood the replacement will also be damaged and you get to repeat the process ad nauseum.
Link Posted: 1/15/2021 12:17:29 AM EST
Following this thread. I am about to order a 10' maple butcher block top for a garage workbench. Also planning to coat with the same ring oil you used. The whole oiling process has me a little nervous, hoping I don't do something wrong and have it cup on me.

your tops look REALLY good OP
Link Posted: 1/15/2021 12:43:25 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By number9XD:
Following this thread. I am about to order a 10' maple butcher block top for a garage workbench. Also planning to coat with the same ring oil you used. The whole oiling process has me a little nervous, hoping I don't do something wrong and have it cup on me.

your tops look REALLY good OP
View Quote


Its almost impossible to screw up oiling wood.

Just soak it in oil on all surfaces and wipe excess. Use 00 or 000 steel wool or a maroon abrasive pad the day after, wipe away all crud and repeat the oiling and in between steps twice more.

Coating all surfaces helps assure balance and equilibrium. If you only coat the top but not the bottom for instance, you may have some problems.
Link Posted: 1/15/2021 12:47:04 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/15/2021 12:51:54 AM EST by Trollslayer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By number9XD:
Following this thread. I am about to order a 10' maple butcher block top for a garage workbench. Also planning to coat with the same ring oil you used. The whole oiling process has me a little nervous, hoping I don't do something wrong and have it cup on me.

your tops look REALLY good OP
View Quote


Thanks very much.  I am happy with how it came out.

You really cannot do it wrong.  Follow the instructions - a few coats on the bottom; a few coats on the top and edges and you are good to go.  

Fear not!  It is NOT like lacquer or varnish.  It is easy - like finger painting, just smear it on, then smear some more on.  

If you damage the surface in use, just smear on some more.  :-)

In this forum, they encourage us to post follow-up pics and posts to show how things came out.  I have some pics of the finished butt joint and the counters with the sink and faucet installed.  I'll post soon.
 
This weekend I'll be tiling the backsplash - an entirely different skill set.
Link Posted: 1/17/2021 7:47:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/17/2021 7:49:51 PM EST by Trollslayer]
The tiling didn't happen due to an issue with the tiles, themselves.

To tide you over, here's a photo of the butt joint (seam) between two sections of counter.  It's not perfect but, hack that I am, it is "good enough".  Photo makes counters look darker than they are.

Link Posted: 1/17/2021 11:39:43 PM EST
Looks good man
Link Posted: 1/22/2021 9:55:36 PM EST
I picked up a12' maple top this evening. Have to cut it down to 10' and ease the square edges before oiling.

OP, did you get the Milk Paint Pure Tung Oil (not darkened)?  Also, did you apply full strength or cut it down with something for the first coats?  What size did you buy and how much have you used?
Link Posted: 1/22/2021 11:13:03 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By number9XD:
I picked up a12' maple top this evening. Have to cut it down to 10' and ease the square edges before oiling.

OP, did you get the Milk Paint Pure Tung Oil (not darkened)?  Also, did you apply full strength or cut it down with something for the first coats?  What size did you buy and how much have you used?
View Quote


I'm not the OP, but you should thin it down with mineral spirits for the first application. About 1/3 MS to 2/3 TO. This helps it penetrate deeper into the wood. You can apply it straight, won't hurt, but it won't penetrate as deep. Make sure you get actual tung oil and not "tung oil finish" as that is actually a varnish, not just a pure oil.
Link Posted: 1/23/2021 9:16:00 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By A_G:


I'm not the OP, but you should thin it down with mineral spirits for the first application. About 1/3 MS to 2/3 TO. This helps it penetrate deeper into the wood. You can apply it straight, won't hurt, but it won't penetrate as deep. Make sure you get actual tung oil and not "tung oil finish" as that is actually a varnish, not just a pure oil.
View Quote
Thanks! I'd planned on cutting with odorless mineral spirits. I went ahead and ordered the 32oz bottle.
Link Posted: 1/23/2021 12:49:29 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/23/2021 3:50:34 PM EST by Trollslayer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By number9XD:
I picked up a12' maple top this evening. Have to cut it down to 10' and ease the square edges before oiling.

OP, did you get the Milk Paint Pure Tung Oil (not darkened)?  Also, did you apply full strength or cut it down with something for the first coats?  What size did you buy and how much have you used?
View Quote


Yes, Milk Paint brand pure tung oil and their thinner.

For your counter size, I'd advise you to buy at least a gallon of tung oil and a gallon of their thinner.  You use the 50:50 thinned material on the edge grain and 100% oil on the end grain.  

I started with a quart of 50:50 and a quart of 100%.  A second order was needed - a gallon of 100% and a gallon of thinner.  Thinning is super easy to do, as the ratio does not need to be perfect.  I do have some left over after treating 14' of counter top (well over a quart each of oil and solvent are left).

P.S. - I really liked the orange scent, a lot.  

P.P.S. - Remember to properly store and dispose of the rags.
Link Posted: 1/25/2021 1:17:05 PM EST
Have a question on the oiling process. I know I need to oil all sides, but not sure on the order of the process to keep it from cupping. I am thinking:

- butcher block placed on saw horses with bottom surface facing up
- oil the bottom surface (facing up)
- let it sit for ???? length of time
- flip it over so bottom is now sitting on the horses and top surface facing up
- oil top surface and all sides


Does that sound right? How long can it sit with the oil on one surface before flipping to do the other side? I would think it need to sit long enough for the oil to soak in, but at what point is too long that runs the risk of starting to cup?




Link Posted: 1/25/2021 4:20:53 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By number9XD:
Have a question on the oiling process. I know I need to oil all sides, but not sure on the order of the process to keep it from cupping. I am thinking:

- butcher block placed on saw horses with bottom surface facing up
- oil the bottom surface (facing up)
- let it sit for ???? length of time
- flip it over so bottom is now sitting on the horses and top surface facing up
- oil top surface and all sides


Does that sound right? How long can it sit with the oil on one surface before flipping to do the other side? I would think it need to sit long enough for the oil to soak in, but at what point is too long that runs the risk of starting to cup?




View Quote


You're over thinking this.

Yes, that is a good order to oil, not for reducing the cupping, but to keep the show side looking nice.

For the first, thinned down coat, a ten minute or so soak time is good. Wipe off excess. Subsequent coats five to ten minutes of soak time, wipe excess thoroughly.

It's important to not let it sit too long as the oil will begin to polymerize and become a sticky, gummy mess. Wipe excess very well for the same reason. Between coats use a maroon ScotchBrite pad or 0000 steel wool.
Link Posted: 1/30/2021 3:16:47 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By A_G:


You're over thinking this.

Yes, that is a good order to oil, not for reducing the cupping, but to keep the show side looking nice.

For the first, thinned down coat, a ten minute or so soak time is good. Wipe off excess. Subsequent coats five to ten minutes of soak time, wipe excess thoroughly.

It's important to not let it sit too long as the oil will begin to polymerize and become a sticky, gummy mess. Wipe excess very well for the same reason. Between coats use a maroon ScotchBrite pad or 0000 steel wool.
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Originally Posted By A_G:
Originally Posted By number9XD:
Have a question on the oiling process. I know I need to oil all sides, but not sure on the order of the process to keep it from cupping. I am thinking:

- butcher block placed on saw horses with bottom surface facing up
- oil the bottom surface (facing up)
- let it sit for ???? length of time
- flip it over so bottom is now sitting on the horses and top surface facing up
- oil top surface and all sides


Does that sound right? How long can it sit with the oil on one surface before flipping to do the other side? I would think it need to sit long enough for the oil to soak in, but at what point is too long that runs the risk of starting to cup?






You're over thinking this.

Yes, that is a good order to oil, not for reducing the cupping, but to keep the show side looking nice.

For the first, thinned down coat, a ten minute or so soak time is good. Wipe off excess. Subsequent coats five to ten minutes of soak time, wipe excess thoroughly.

It's important to not let it sit too long as the oil will begin to polymerize and become a sticky, gummy mess. Wipe excess very well for the same reason. Between coats use a maroon ScotchBrite pad or 0000 steel wool.
Thank you, been following the advice given here.

OP - you got any update?

Im sitting here waiting to wipe off the 3rd coat now. Allowing 24hr between, doing a coat every evening basically, but didn't get to yesterday. All 3 have been 1:1 with mineral spirits. I think I can maybe get 2 more coats out of this 32oz jug.

Ive been making sure it's coated to where it looks like it's got a glossy coat of poly on it. Letting it stand for about 30min while continually checking for spots that look like they're drying and dabbing more on.
Link Posted: 1/30/2021 3:46:37 PM EST
I did the bottom first.  After several days, I flipped it over and started on the top.

At first, I used painter's points to support the counter as I worked the top surface.  They were less than stable, so I switched over to blocks of wood resting on spots that would not be seen.  I oiled the blocks so they wouldn't scavenge too much oil from the bottom of the counter.

Be careful but it's not rocket science.

P.S. - While I had oily rags, I quickly oiled some kitchen knife handles.  They are now awesome.
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