Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
User Panel

Page / 74
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 11:26:52 AM EST
[#1]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Truck is 6 speed auto, but I have the tow package so it allows me to "shift" or hold in gear longer.
I never thought of renting. That's not a bad idea at all.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
If you can manage it at all, go fifth-wheel.  They tow much better, especially in high winds.  I find hooking up with a fifth-wheel to me MUCH easier because I have to do it alone.  I now have a much smaller travel trailer and it's OK, but I miss my fifth-wheel.  

I would highly recommend using 3/4 of your rated towing capacity as an absolute maximum for trailer gross weight, 7,200# in your case.  Remember that everything you stick in the trailer counts towards gross weight, including fresh water, gray water and black water.  It's REALLY easy to get overloaded.  

If your tow vehicle is a stick, plan on doing a lot of shifting in even moderately hilly country.

The bathroom is where it's at!  I can deal with small appliances, dining area, and not-quite-queen sized bed, but having a tiny shower SUCKS.

Trailer camping is a blast!  I've dragged mine into some truly beautiful places and met a lot of very nice people.  I used to do a lot of tent camping, but now I want my creature comforts.  Did I mention the bathroom being important?  When I want to rough it, I don't set up the satellite dish.

There are dozens, if not hundreds, of manufacturers out there.  When you get closer to buying, check back in and I'm sure the people here can give you a long checklist of what to look for and look out for.

You may want to consider renting a trailer just to see if you like it.  Plan a week-long trip somewhere just far enough away that you can't run back into the house for things you forgot, like the bathroom.  Anyone can put up with a trailer for a weekend, but after five days or so the little things start to wear on you.


Truck is 6 speed auto, but I have the tow package so it allows me to "shift" or hold in gear longer.
I never thought of renting. That's not a bad idea at all.


Back when I was camping just a few times a year, I rented a travel trailer from a local dealer whenever I wanted to go.  They usually had a decent selection of used trailers for sale that were available to rent.  

When I started camping more often, I bought a gently used 1996 Airstream and it's been a great trailer.  20yrs old now and still looks like new (although it takes some work to keep it looking that way.)
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 11:29:42 AM EST
[#2]
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 11:52:47 AM EST
[#3]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
My truck has the manual shift mode when in haul mode so I can hold it in gear to maintain rpm
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:

I've had several 5.3s.    For a typical TT, I try to keep the gross trailer weight under 7k lbs (under 6k preferably).   The rig can pull a lot more weight, but keeping it lighter makes longer trips much more enjoyable - especially in the West where every wind is a headwind, and every road goes uphill.



With a gas engine, you're relying on higher RPMS to get up those hills and push through those headwinds, and those higher revs aren't all that good for GM trannys. So keep the weight down - don't get sucked into thinking you need 8 slideouts and a garage bay for your Ferrari.    Keep the grey/black/fresh water tanks empty whenever you can, tell the wife she can only bring 3 pairs of shoes.




My truck has the manual shift mode when in haul mode so I can hold it in gear to maintain rpm


I've found that 'Tow Mode' (which yours should have if it has the HD Tow Package) does a good job of managing the transmission.



This is the load-balancing hitch I have:  Equal-i-zer Make sure to get the right one for your trailer weight.  Don't get the 20,000 lb. capacity model if you have a 5,000 lb. trailer.  You can have problems.



Here's a nice hitch selector tool.  I entered 5,000 for the trailer weight, 500 tongue weight, and 500 cargo weight.  It told me to get the 10,000 lb. hitch, and it works great!.









 
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 11:59:47 AM EST
[#4]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History


I agree.  That's a lot of RV for that money.



 
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 12:06:14 PM EST
[#5]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I've found that 'Tow Mode' (which yours should have if it has the HD Tow Package) does a good job of managing the transmission.

This is the load-balancing hitch I have:  Equal-i-zer Make sure to get the right one for your trailer weight.  Don't get the 20,000 lb. capacity model if you have a 5,000 lb. trailer.  You can have problems.

Here's a nice hitch selector tool.  I entered 5,000 for the trailer weight, 500 tongue weight, and 500 cargo weight.  It told me to get the 10,000 lb. hitch, and it works great!.


http://www.equalizerhitch.com/img/hitch.png
 
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I've had several 5.3s.    For a typical TT, I try to keep the gross trailer weight under 7k lbs (under 6k preferably).   The rig can pull a lot more weight, but keeping it lighter makes longer trips much more enjoyable - especially in the West where every wind is a headwind, and every road goes uphill.

With a gas engine, you're relying on higher RPMS to get up those hills and push through those headwinds, and those higher revs aren't all that good for GM trannys. So keep the weight down - don't get sucked into thinking you need 8 slideouts and a garage bay for your Ferrari.    Keep the grey/black/fresh water tanks empty whenever you can, tell the wife she can only bring 3 pairs of shoes.


My truck has the manual shift mode when in haul mode so I can hold it in gear to maintain rpm

I've found that 'Tow Mode' (which yours should have if it has the HD Tow Package) does a good job of managing the transmission.

This is the load-balancing hitch I have:  Equal-i-zer Make sure to get the right one for your trailer weight.  Don't get the 20,000 lb. capacity model if you have a 5,000 lb. trailer.  You can have problems.

Here's a nice hitch selector tool.  I entered 5,000 for the trailer weight, 500 tongue weight, and 500 cargo weight.  It told me to get the 10,000 lb. hitch, and it works great!.


http://www.equalizerhitch.com/img/hitch.png
 


Damn!!!! 800 bucks is some serious coin for a hitch, but I guess that's the price of piece of mind.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 12:20:45 PM EST
[#6]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Damn!!!! 800 bucks is some serious coin for a hitch, but I guess that's the price of piece of mind.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I've had several 5.3s.    For a typical TT, I try to keep the gross trailer weight under 7k lbs (under 6k preferably).   The rig can pull a lot more weight, but keeping it lighter makes longer trips much more enjoyable - especially in the West where every wind is a headwind, and every road goes uphill.

With a gas engine, you're relying on higher RPMS to get up those hills and push through those headwinds, and those higher revs aren't all that good for GM trannys. So keep the weight down - don't get sucked into thinking you need 8 slideouts and a garage bay for your Ferrari.    Keep the grey/black/fresh water tanks empty whenever you can, tell the wife she can only bring 3 pairs of shoes.


My truck has the manual shift mode when in haul mode so I can hold it in gear to maintain rpm

I've found that 'Tow Mode' (which yours should have if it has the HD Tow Package) does a good job of managing the transmission.

This is the load-balancing hitch I have:  Equal-i-zer Make sure to get the right one for your trailer weight.  Don't get the 20,000 lb. capacity model if you have a 5,000 lb. trailer.  You can have problems.

Here's a nice hitch selector tool.  I entered 5,000 for the trailer weight, 500 tongue weight, and 500 cargo weight.  It told me to get the 10,000 lb. hitch, and it works great!.


http://www.equalizerhitch.com/img/hitch.png
 


Damn!!!! 800 bucks is some serious coin for a hitch, but I guess that's the price of piece of mind.


Keep in mind its and equalizer and sway control all in one.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 12:21:16 PM EST
[#7]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Your trucks brakes need to be serviced and be in good shape.
A quality brake controller is made by Prodigy. You will need one, it interfaces your truck brakes with the trailer brakes.
http://www.tekonsha.com/

View Quote


^ This is what I was going to add.  Ensure any rig you buy has brakes, not all do.  You do NOT want to rely solely on your truck's brakes, you want the rig to have brakes too and a quality controller installed in your truck so they all work together.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 12:30:32 PM EST
[#8]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History



I have been shopping the RPod 179, they are very nicely equipped for an ultralight.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 12:34:20 PM EST
[#9]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



I have been shopping the RPod 179, they are very nicely equipped for an ultralight.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



I have been shopping the RPod 179, they are very nicely equipped for an ultralight.


I'll have to look that one up.

ETA: how many people are you planning on putting in there?
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 12:47:20 PM EST
[#10]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I'll have to look that one up.

ETA: how many people are you planning on putting in there?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:



I have been shopping the RPod 179, they are very nicely equipped for an ultralight.


I'll have to look that one up.

ETA: how many people are you planning on putting in there?


Two, my wife and I. They have a very nice screen room that attaches to the side, and although the entire rig is quite small and I am 6'5" and change there is not only headroom but also a big enough bed.

I want something small and light enough that it will not limit access to hard to get to places. The next step up and also a consideration is a Forest River Surveyor. I prefer to have 2 axles for several reasons. Also in that class is the Forest River Rockwood Mini-lite which I really like because it has a window in the front as well as the bed. All are fiberglass sidewall and full one piece roof.

The one linked above is priced right but I hate that corrugated sidewall material.

Link Posted: 4/26/2016 12:51:35 PM EST
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Two, my wife and I. They have a very nice screen room that attaches to the side, and although the entire rig is quite small and I am 6'5" and change there is not only headroom but also a big enough bed.

I want something small and light enough that it will not limit access to hard to get to places. The next step up and also a consideration is a Forest River Surveyor. I prefer to have 2 axles for several reasons. Also in that class is the Forest River Rockwood Mini-lite which I really like because it has a window in the front as well as the bed. All are fiberglass sidewall and full one piece roof.

The one linked above is priced right but I hate that corrugated sidewall material.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:



I have been shopping the RPod 179, they are very nicely equipped for an ultralight.


I'll have to look that one up.

ETA: how many people are you planning on putting in there?


Two, my wife and I. They have a very nice screen room that attaches to the side, and although the entire rig is quite small and I am 6'5" and change there is not only headroom but also a big enough bed.

I want something small and light enough that it will not limit access to hard to get to places. The next step up and also a consideration is a Forest River Surveyor. I prefer to have 2 axles for several reasons. Also in that class is the Forest River Rockwood Mini-lite which I really like because it has a window in the front as well as the bed. All are fiberglass sidewall and full one piece roof.

The one linked above is priced right but I hate that corrugated sidewall material.



Makes sense. I'd probably get one a little longer simply because it would be me, wife, 2 dogs, and most likely kids.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 1:03:42 PM EST
[#12]
Renting is cheaper.  The only exception may be for something you use almost every weekend.  I had a self contained toy hauler, always ready to go, and we used it almost every weekend from fall to spring. It was still a huge cost, but averaged out, I spent a lot less having fun than many people do.  

Maintenance was still a bitch and I am glad I no longer have the burden.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 1:09:00 PM EST
[#13]
1/2T truck

20-23' lightweight trailer
Good equalizer hitch
Top quality electronic brake controller
Transmission cooler if tow is an automatic
MAYBE a small generator 1000w or 2000w inverter type like a Honda EU2000i
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 1:14:20 PM EST
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
1/2T truck

20-23' lightweight trailer
Good equalizer hitch
Top quality electronic brake controller
Transmission cooler if tow is an automatic
MAYBE a small generator 1000w or 2000w inverter type like a Honda EU2000i
View Quote


You'll want a slightly larger one if you run air conditioning. The small ones are nice for everything else.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 1:14:40 PM EST
[#15]
Looking at the Puma 23' by Palomino. Looks pretty nice. I have no idea of cost.

UVW = 4831 lbs.

ETA

The 24 FBS (Slide out) looks pretty nice too. Although someone mentioned avoiding the slide outs because of leak issues.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 1:20:28 PM EST
[#16]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Looking at the Puma 23' by Palomino. Looks pretty nice. I have no idea of cost.

UVW = 4831 lbs.

ETA

The 24 FBS (Slide out) looks pretty nice too. Although someone mentioned avoiding the slide outs because of leak issues.
View Quote


We looked at the Puma.. Granted we was looking at a toy hauler version but the quality was night and day between the XLR hyperlite we ended up going with.. The tie downs on the Puma was rated at 1000lbs XLR is rated a 5k.. The regular TT might be different quality but the Puma TH left alot to be desired... I did like their floor plan though.

ETA also something to consider. If the fiberglass shell is an option on anything you look at, I would definitely go spring for that over the metal.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 1:27:23 PM EST
[#17]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History

I haul those. That one looks like a demo unit that would sit in a show room so you can get an idea of what options you could get with different trim packages. It's missing the cover for the propane tanks. Also notice the seam on the front of the trailer just belouthe marker lights. That whole front section flexes and deforms in the wind at highway speeds, that seam will eventually leak right into the forward sleeping area. They tow pretty decently unless there is window over 10mph that isnt a tailwind, then they are all over the place. The frame and axles that is built on has sat out side in the Indiana weether for a while too. Even at that price its not worth it IMHO.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 1:27:43 PM EST
[#18]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


We looked at the Puma.. Granted we was looking at a toy hauler version but the quality was night and day between the XLR hyperlite we ended up going with.. The tie downs on the Puma was rated at 1000lbs XLR is rated a 5k.. The regular TT might be different quality but the Puma TH left alot to be desired... I did like their floor plan though.

ETA also something to consider. If the fiberglass shell is an option on anything you look at, I would definitely go spring for that over the metal.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Looking at the Puma 23' by Palomino. Looks pretty nice. I have no idea of cost.

UVW = 4831 lbs.

ETA

The 24 FBS (Slide out) looks pretty nice too. Although someone mentioned avoiding the slide outs because of leak issues.


We looked at the Puma.. Granted we was looking at a toy hauler version but the quality was night and day between the XLR hyperlite we ended up going with.. The tie downs on the Puma was rated at 1000lbs XLR is rated a 5k.. The regular TT might be different quality but the Puma TH left alot to be desired... I did like their floor plan though.

ETA also something to consider. If the fiberglass shell is an option on anything you look at, I would definitely go spring for that over the metal.



Good to know. I just spent 10 minutes trying to figure out if the Pumas had brakes, but couldn't find anything on their website. However, if the quality isn't all that great, it might not matter.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 1:42:23 PM EST
[#19]
i'm a huge fan of slideouts, makes a big difference in roominess. Mine didnt leak at all fwiw.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 3:12:19 PM EST
[#20]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
i'm a huge fan of slideouts, makes a big difference in roominess. Mine didnt leak at all fwiw.
View Quote


Good because I can see how that feature would add so much space.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 3:18:31 PM EST
[#21]
RV Network and Escapees for helpful info.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 3:50:11 PM EST
[#22]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
RV Network and Escapees for helpful info.
View Quote


Appreciated...
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 3:58:02 PM EST
[#23]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I saw a few used ones in the 30' range for under 15K. I have no intention of buying new.

Also, not looking for an RV, but rather something I can tow.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
If you are going to buy an RV hit the used market and save yourself a ton of money. Just keep in mind the wife will be a big input as to what you buy.


I saw a few used ones in the 30' range for under 15K. I have no intention of buying new.

Also, not looking for an RV, but rather something I can tow.


30ft gets damn long for a bumper pull/tag trailer.  And it gets heavy.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 4:00:39 PM EST
[#24]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Truck is 6 speed auto, but I have the tow package so it allows me to "shift" or hold in gear longer.
I never thought of renting. That's not a bad idea at all.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
If you can manage it at all, go fifth-wheel.  They tow much better, especially in high winds.  I find hooking up with a fifth-wheel to me MUCH easier because I have to do it alone.  I now have a much smaller travel trailer and it's OK, but I miss my fifth-wheel.  

I would highly recommend using 3/4 of your rated towing capacity as an absolute maximum for trailer gross weight, 7,200# in your case.  Remember that everything you stick in the trailer counts towards gross weight, including fresh water, gray water and black water.  It's REALLY easy to get overloaded.  

If your tow vehicle is a stick, plan on doing a lot of shifting in even moderately hilly country.

The bathroom is where it's at!  I can deal with small appliances, dining area, and not-quite-queen sized bed, but having a tiny shower SUCKS.

Trailer camping is a blast!  I've dragged mine into some truly beautiful places and met a lot of very nice people.  I used to do a lot of tent camping, but now I want my creature comforts.  Did I mention the bathroom being important?  When I want to rough it, I don't set up the satellite dish.

There are dozens, if not hundreds, of manufacturers out there.  When you get closer to buying, check back in and I'm sure the people here can give you a long checklist of what to look for and look out for.

You may want to consider renting a trailer just to see if you like it.  Plan a week-long trip somewhere just far enough away that you can't run back into the house for things you forgot, like the bathroom.  Anyone can put up with a trailer for a weekend, but after five days or so the little things start to wear on you.


Truck is 6 speed auto, but I have the tow package so it allows me to "shift" or hold in gear longer.
I never thought of renting. That's not a bad idea at all.


depending on how often you actually use the trailer renting may be the smarter plan in the long run.  Seriously consider this as an option.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 4:05:05 PM EST
[#25]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I have a 26' (29' w/ trailer tongue) Forest River Grey Wolf. I pull it with a 2015 Silverado 1500 (5.3L) that has the tow package and I believe the trailer weighs around 6,000-7,000 and it does it with ease. Does your truck have the built in trailer brake package? That makes it so much cleaner and simpler not having to install an aftermarket brake controller.

Things to consider on towing a travel trailer:

-get a good weight distribution system; helps with sway, bouncing, and puts weight back on the trailer
-airbags, not necessary but I just had some installed and it keeps the truck level and keeps my OCD under control
View Quote


Weight distributing hitches move trailer tongue weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle.

"Putting weight back on the trailer" can be accomplished by loading the trailer so the weight is behind the trailer axles - and reduces tongue weight.  With a bumper pull trailer you want ~10-15% of the trailer weight as tongue weight - this is trailer dependent, not tow vehicle dependent.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 4:05:38 PM EST
[#26]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I saw a few used ones in the 30' range for under 15K. I have no intention of buying new.

Also, not looking for an RV, but rather something I can tow.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
If you are going to buy an RV hit the used market and save yourself a ton of money. Just keep in mind the wife will be a big input as to what you buy.


I saw a few used ones in the 30' range for under 15K. I have no intention of buying new.

Also, not looking for an RV, but rather something I can tow.


Mine is a Forest-River-Wildwood-28-DBUD and we love it.  You will appreciate the super slide once you're in it!
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 4:07:44 PM EST
[#27]
How many people do you want to be able to sleep?

My parents just went through that process and I helped them a lot. Their vehicle had the same tow limit. I think they decided the empty weight of the trailer had to be under 6500 if they wanted to tow comfortably. My short answer is the trailers by Grand Design were by far the best built looking trailers we saw. They ended up with a Grand Design Imagine 2150. They however could have gotten the 2800 and been fine.

Their reason for replacing was that their Keystone Bullet 204RBS was just a bit too small. It was good as a place to sleep and eat, but that was it. You couldn't spend much time in there without feeling cramped, certainly not if more than 2 people were in there. Their major must have to combat this was a slideout. It really opens things up and allows someone to cook while other people can get past them.

Other key features they wanted
-Ability to sleep 4 adults
-Sofa for entertaining and hanging out
-A master "bedroom" separate from the rest of the trailer
-More water tank capacity than their current trailer which had 42 fresh, 30 black, and 30 gray. That wasn't enough for more than a weekend without hoookups.
-Hard overall length limit of 32' to make sure there weren't any camp spaces that they couldn't fit into.

I didn't fully agree with them. The one major thing I would have added was bunks, which I think are a better solution for guests than a hideabed. If I were choosing, I would have picked the Grand Design 2800.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 5:13:11 PM EST
[#28]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I agree.  That's a lot of RV for that money.
 
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I agree.  That's a lot of RV for that money.
 


Got to be a catch somewhere in that.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 7:25:39 PM EST
[#29]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Damn!!!! 800 bucks is some serious coin for a hitch, but I guess that's the price of piece of mind.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I've found that 'Tow Mode' (which yours should have if it has the HD Tow Package) does a good job of managing the transmission.

This is the load-balancing hitch I have:  Equal-i-zer Make sure to get the right one for your trailer weight.  Don't get the 20,000 lb. capacity model if you have a 5,000 lb. trailer.  You can have problems.

Here's a nice hitch selector tool.  I entered 5,000 for the trailer weight, 500 tongue weight, and 500 cargo weight.  It told me to get the 10,000 lb. hitch, and it works great!.


http://www.equalizerhitch.com/img/hitch.png
 


Damn!!!! 800 bucks is some serious coin for a hitch, but I guess that's the price of piece of mind.



Just a data point on W/D hitches.  I have pulled with several different varieties of hitches from the $1k+ almost-hitches-itself variety to a ball stuck through the bumper.  When it comes down to it all of the distribution hitches are just big ass springs attached to the hitch.  I currently run a $150 (on sale) Harbor Freight 10k weight distributing hitch pulling both my 14' cargo trailer (habitually and tragically overloaded) and my buddies 24' flat bed car hauler with everything from cars to a skidsteer on it, and as long as it is properly adjusted, it pulls exactly the same as the more expensive ones.  90% of the "niceness" that makes the $800 hitch $800 involve nuances that make hitching, adjusting and unhitching easier/nicer.  Once it is attached and adjusted, it works just as good.  I am totally fine with having to clean/grease/paint more often, and to have to take a bit more time adjusting and hitching for the cost savings.  Not every needs an aimpoint, sometimes a $50 Chinese special works 90% as well and you can afford a lot of replacements...
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 7:54:01 PM EST
[#30]
I have a question. We've been looking at 5th wheelers and some come with built in generators. Can you operate the generator and AC while towing to keep the trailer cool while traveling? I've gotten conflicting answers on this.
Link Posted: 4/26/2016 9:16:43 PM EST
[#31]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Just a data point on W/D hitches.  I have pulled with several different varieties of hitches from the $1k+ almost-hitches-itself variety to a ball stuck through the bumper.  When it comes down to it all of the distribution hitches are just big ass springs attached to the hitch.  I currently run a $150 (on sale) Harbor Freight 10k weight distributing hitch pulling both my 14' cargo trailer (habitually and tragically overloaded) and my buddies 24' flat bed car hauler with everything from cars to a skidsteer on it, and as long as it is properly adjusted, it pulls exactly the same as the more expensive ones.  90% of the "niceness" that makes the $800 hitch $800 involve nuances that make hitching, adjusting and unhitching easier/nicer.  Once it is attached and adjusted, it works just as good.  I am totally fine with having to clean/grease/paint more often, and to have to take a bit more time adjusting and hitching for the cost savings.  Not every needs an aimpoint, sometimes a $50 Chinese special works 90% as well and you can afford a lot of replacements...
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I've found that 'Tow Mode' (which yours should have if it has the HD Tow Package) does a good job of managing the transmission.

This is the load-balancing hitch I have:  Equal-i-zer Make sure to get the right one for your trailer weight.  Don't get the 20,000 lb. capacity model if you have a 5,000 lb. trailer.  You can have problems.

Here's a nice hitch selector tool.  I entered 5,000 for the trailer weight, 500 tongue weight, and 500 cargo weight.  It told me to get the 10,000 lb. hitch, and it works great!.


http://www.equalizerhitch.com/img/hitch.png
 


Damn!!!! 800 bucks is some serious coin for a hitch, but I guess that's the price of piece of mind.



Just a data point on W/D hitches.  I have pulled with several different varieties of hitches from the $1k+ almost-hitches-itself variety to a ball stuck through the bumper.  When it comes down to it all of the distribution hitches are just big ass springs attached to the hitch.  I currently run a $150 (on sale) Harbor Freight 10k weight distributing hitch pulling both my 14' cargo trailer (habitually and tragically overloaded) and my buddies 24' flat bed car hauler with everything from cars to a skidsteer on it, and as long as it is properly adjusted, it pulls exactly the same as the more expensive ones.  90% of the "niceness" that makes the $800 hitch $800 involve nuances that make hitching, adjusting and unhitching easier/nicer.  Once it is attached and adjusted, it works just as good.  I am totally fine with having to clean/grease/paint more often, and to have to take a bit more time adjusting and hitching for the cost savings.  Not every needs an aimpoint, sometimes a $50 Chinese special works 90% as well and you can afford a lot of replacements...


I have not used any of them and would not argue the point with you, but I will say I trust Chinaman metallurgy almost as much as Hillary Clinton.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 2:15:15 AM EST
[#32]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I have not used any of them and would not argue the point with you, but I will say I trust Chinaman metallurgy almost as much as Hillary Clinton.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I've found that 'Tow Mode' (which yours should have if it has the HD Tow Package) does a good job of managing the transmission.

This is the load-balancing hitch I have:  Equal-i-zer Make sure to get the right one for your trailer weight.  Don't get the 20,000 lb. capacity model if you have a 5,000 lb. trailer.  You can have problems.

Here's a nice hitch selector tool.  I entered 5,000 for the trailer weight, 500 tongue weight, and 500 cargo weight.  It told me to get the 10,000 lb. hitch, and it works great!.


http://www.equalizerhitch.com/img/hitch.png
 


Damn!!!! 800 bucks is some serious coin for a hitch, but I guess that's the price of piece of mind.



Just a data point on W/D hitches.  I have pulled with several different varieties of hitches from the $1k+ almost-hitches-itself variety to a ball stuck through the bumper.  When it comes down to it all of the distribution hitches are just big ass springs attached to the hitch.  I currently run a $150 (on sale) Harbor Freight 10k weight distributing hitch pulling both my 14' cargo trailer (habitually and tragically overloaded) and my buddies 24' flat bed car hauler with everything from cars to a skidsteer on it, and as long as it is properly adjusted, it pulls exactly the same as the more expensive ones.  90% of the "niceness" that makes the $800 hitch $800 involve nuances that make hitching, adjusting and unhitching easier/nicer.  Once it is attached and adjusted, it works just as good.  I am totally fine with having to clean/grease/paint more often, and to have to take a bit more time adjusting and hitching for the cost savings.  Not every needs an aimpoint, sometimes a $50 Chinese special works 90% as well and you can afford a lot of replacements...


I have not used any of them and would not argue the point with you, but I will say I trust Chinaman metallurgy almost as much as Hillary Clinton.


Trailer towing items are not something I buy at Harbor Freight - and I have plenty of stuff from HF including their 56" tool box set. I recently had a weld failure on a HF 3ton jackstand.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 6:33:16 AM EST
[#33]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
How many people do you want to be able to sleep?

My parents just went through that process and I helped them a lot. Their vehicle had the same tow limit. I think they decided the empty weight of the trailer had to be under 6500 if they wanted to tow comfortably. My short answer is the trailers by Grand Design were by far the best built looking trailers we saw. They ended up with a Grand Design Imagine 2150. They however could have gotten the 2800 and been fine.

Their reason for replacing was that their Keystone Bullet 204RBS was just a bit too small. It was good as a place to sleep and eat, but that was it. You couldn't spend much time in there without feeling cramped, certainly not if more than 2 people were in there. Their major must have to combat this was a slideout. It really opens things up and allows someone to cook while other people can get past them.

Other key features they wanted
-Ability to sleep 4 adults
-Sofa for entertaining and hanging out
-A master "bedroom" separate from the rest of the trailer
-More water tank capacity than their current trailer which had 42 fresh, 30 black, and 30 gray. That wasn't enough for more than a weekend without hoookups.
-Hard overall length limit of 32' to make sure there weren't any camp spaces that they couldn't fit into.

I didn't fully agree with them. The one major thing I would have added was bunks, which I think are a better solution for guests than a hideabed. If I were choosing, I would have picked the Grand Design 2800.
View Quote


I was reading this while at happy hour so I couldn't really respond. Thank you for adding this info. I looked at the Grand Design 2800, but I think that is larger than I need and could tow.
I think we'll go and look for fun this weekend. There is a huge place about 30 miles from us in PA.
I like your parents' list. I want pretty much the same thing and will be taking the advise from this thread to make sure the grey tank is 40 or more gallons.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 8:26:57 AM EST
[#34]
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 9:09:30 AM EST
[#35]




Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Not sure if it has the brake package, but it does have the "haul mode" so it changes the shift points and uses the engine to brake. According to the built sheet (provided by an ARCOM member) I have the PDU, Z85, and Z82 upgrades. So H.D. cooling, towing suspension, H.D. towing equipment.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:




I have a 26' (29' w/ trailer tongue) Forest River Grey Wolf. I pull it with a 2015 Silverado 1500 (5.3L) that has the tow package and I believe the trailer weighs around 6,000-7,000 and it does it with ease. Does your truck have the built in trailer brake package? That makes it so much cleaner and simpler not having to install an aftermarket brake controller.
Things to consider on towing a travel trailer:
-get a good weight distribution system; helps with sway, bouncing, and puts weight back on the trailer




-airbags, not necessary but I just had some installed and it keeps the truck level and keeps my OCD under control

Not sure if it has the brake package, but it does have the "haul mode" so it changes the shift points and uses the engine to brake. According to the built sheet (provided by an ARCOM member) I have the PDU, Z85, and Z82 upgrades. So H.D. cooling, towing suspension, H.D. towing equipment.





My rig is set up very similar to what you say yours has. I have a 6.2 litre - 400 hp Yukon Denali and pull a 2011 28' Keystone Zinger - which I bought new. I find 70 mph on the interstate easy to do.





There are brake controllers out now that read g-forces and convert them to braking force. I run a Tekonsha P3. Pretty much state of the art.














Bear in mind towing weight includes all the stuff loaded in/on the trailer and in your truck. You can have a 6,000lb trailer but if you carry 1500lbs of water, food, a generator, gas, beer, etc., you now have a 7,500lb trailer.
For tag-along trailers, a weight distributing/load stabilizing hitch is a must. The spring bars stop 'sway' on the highway and allows you to level the load front to back. I think my hitch setup ran about $800.00. It also needs to be 'set-up' on the first use. My setup is identical to this one:

Using an automatic transmission in towing something as heavy as an RV requires changing the fluid and filter about every 3,000 miles of towing as the extra heat is really hard on ATF. If your vehicle doesn't have a transmission temperature display built in your going to need a transmission temperature gauge of some sort. You don't want your automatic transmission to get above about 240* and ~220* is optimum. I do keep a close eye on my temps, especially when pulling hills.
I use my RV as a portable office for long-term remote jobs so I carry a lot of extra stuff in it. Hell, I lived in it for 3+ years on a job a couple years back. In fact, I'm considering selling my house, moving into my RV full time, retiring....and just going fishing.








 

 
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 9:11:10 AM EST
[#36]


So based on my trucks "ability" to tow 9600 lbs. The recommendation is I stay at or below 6600 lbs. Gross weight so trailer and everything in it?

5,000 lbs. dry weight trailer
300 lbs. of water
1200 lbs. of food, beer, toys, and whatnot IN the trailer

~ 6,500 lbs. being towed. Plus I could still carry me, wife, dogs and maybe an extra cooler in the bed of the truck?
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 9:12:53 AM EST
[#37]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
My rig is set up very similar to what you say yours has. I have a 5.3 litre - 400 hp Yukon Denali and pull a 2011 28' Keystone Zinger - which I bought new. I find 70 mph on the interstate easy to do.


There are brake controllers out now that read g-forces and convert them to braking force. I run a Tekonsha P3. Pretty much state of the art.
http://www.capitalhitch.com/images/tekonsha_p3.jpg

Bear in mind towing weight includes all the stuff loaded in/on the trailer and in your truck. You can have a 6,000lb trailer but if you carry 1500lbs of water, food, a generator, gas, beer, etc., you now have a 7,500lb trailer.

For tag-along trailers, a weight distributing/load stabilizing hitch is a must. The spring bars stop 'sway' on the highway and allows you to level the load front to back. I think my hitch setup ran about $800.00. It also needs to be 'set-up' on the first use. My setup is identical to this one:

http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/towing-weight-distribution-3.jpg


Using an automatic transmission in towing something as heavy as an RV requires changing the fluid and filter about every 3,000 miles of towing as the extra heat is really hard on ATF. If your vehicle doesn't have a transmission temperature display built in your going to need a transmission temperature gauge of some sort. You don't want your automatic transmission to get above about 240* and ~220* is optimum. I do keep a close eye on my temps, especially when pulling hills.

I use my RV as a portable office for long-term remote jobs so I carry a lot of extra stuff in it. Hell, I lived in it for 3+ years on a job a couple years back. In fact, I'm considering selling my house, moving into my RV full time, retiring....and just going fishing.


 
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I have a 26' (29' w/ trailer tongue) Forest River Grey Wolf. I pull it with a 2015 Silverado 1500 (5.3L) that has the tow package and I believe the trailer weighs around 6,000-7,000 and it does it with ease. Does your truck have the built in trailer brake package? That makes it so much cleaner and simpler not having to install an aftermarket brake controller.

Things to consider on towing a travel trailer:

-get a good weight distribution system; helps with sway, bouncing, and puts weight back on the trailer
-airbags, not necessary but I just had some installed and it keeps the truck level and keeps my OCD under control



Not sure if it has the brake package, but it does have the "haul mode" so it changes the shift points and uses the engine to brake. According to the built sheet (provided by an ARCOM member) I have the PDU, Z85, and Z82 upgrades. So H.D. cooling, towing suspension, H.D. towing equipment.
My rig is set up very similar to what you say yours has. I have a 5.3 litre - 400 hp Yukon Denali and pull a 2011 28' Keystone Zinger - which I bought new. I find 70 mph on the interstate easy to do.


There are brake controllers out now that read g-forces and convert them to braking force. I run a Tekonsha P3. Pretty much state of the art.
http://www.capitalhitch.com/images/tekonsha_p3.jpg

Bear in mind towing weight includes all the stuff loaded in/on the trailer and in your truck. You can have a 6,000lb trailer but if you carry 1500lbs of water, food, a generator, gas, beer, etc., you now have a 7,500lb trailer.

For tag-along trailers, a weight distributing/load stabilizing hitch is a must. The spring bars stop 'sway' on the highway and allows you to level the load front to back. I think my hitch setup ran about $800.00. It also needs to be 'set-up' on the first use. My setup is identical to this one:

http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/towing-weight-distribution-3.jpg


Using an automatic transmission in towing something as heavy as an RV requires changing the fluid and filter about every 3,000 miles of towing as the extra heat is really hard on ATF. If your vehicle doesn't have a transmission temperature display built in your going to need a transmission temperature gauge of some sort. You don't want your automatic transmission to get above about 240* and ~220* is optimum. I do keep a close eye on my temps, especially when pulling hills.

I use my RV as a portable office for long-term remote jobs so I carry a lot of extra stuff in it. Hell, I lived in it for 3+ years on a job a couple years back. In fact, I'm considering selling my house, moving into my RV full time, retiring....and just going fishing.


 



That is a lot of great info. I must have been typing this while you were typing yours.

ETA: I do have the transmission temp gauge built in.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 9:22:33 AM EST
[#38]
PCSUTTON. I just bought that controller. How long have tyou had it? Any issues with it so far?

And OP. I would try to stay as lite as possible. Bottom line tow package or not, Its still a half ton truck. Not to say it cant pull it, but stopping it is still a concern. We are currently pulling a 24ft HFS XLR with a 2015 F150 4x4. Ford claims the truck will pull almost 12k, and it does, pulls it fine.. But you know its back there when the wind picks up. We are running a WDH as well. We just bought an excursion to take over on towing though. I just feel better with a heavier duty truck pulling it.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 9:23:11 AM EST
[#39]
You may want to look into an aftermarket Transmission cooler as well. Think of it as drive train insurance.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 9:23:21 AM EST
[#40]


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
That is a lot of great info. I must have been typing this while you were typing yours.





ETA: I do have the transmission temp gauge built in.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:





Quoted:




Quoted:




Quoted:


I have a 26' (29' w/ trailer tongue) Forest River Grey Wolf. I pull it with a 2015 Silverado 1500 (5.3L) that has the tow package and I believe the trailer weighs around 6,000-7,000 and it does it with ease. Does your truck have the built in trailer brake package? That makes it so much cleaner and simpler not having to install an aftermarket brake controller.





Things to consider on towing a travel trailer:





-get a good weight distribution system; helps with sway, bouncing, and puts weight back on the trailer


-airbags, not necessary but I just had some installed and it keeps the truck level and keeps my OCD under control

Not sure if it has the brake package, but it does have the "haul mode" so it changes the shift points and uses the engine to brake. According to the built sheet (provided by an ARCOM member) I have the PDU, Z85, and Z82 upgrades. So H.D. cooling, towing suspension, H.D. towing equipment.
My rig is set up very similar to what you say yours has. I have a 5.3 litre - 400 hp Yukon Denali and pull a 2011 28' Keystone Zinger - which I bought new. I find 70 mph on the interstate easy to do.
There are brake controllers out now that read g-forces and convert them to braking force. I run a Tekonsha P3. Pretty much state of the art.


http://www.capitalhitch.com/images/tekonsha_p3.jpg





Bear in mind towing weight includes all the stuff loaded in/on the trailer and in your truck. You can have a 6,000lb trailer but if you carry 1500lbs of water, food, a generator, gas, beer, etc., you now have a 7,500lb trailer.





For tag-along trailers, a weight distributing/load stabilizing hitch is a must. The spring bars stop 'sway' on the highway and allows you to level the load front to back. I think my hitch setup ran about $800.00. It also needs to be 'set-up' on the first use. My setup is identical to this one:





http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/towing-weight-distribution-3.jpg
Using an automatic transmission in towing something as heavy as an RV requires changing the fluid and filter about every 3,000 miles of towing as the extra heat is really hard on ATF. If your vehicle doesn't have a transmission temperature display built in your going to need a transmission temperature gauge of some sort. You don't want your automatic transmission to get above about 240* and ~220* is optimum. I do keep a close eye on my temps, especially when pulling hills.





I use my RV as a portable office for long-term remote jobs so I carry a lot of extra stuff in it. Hell, I lived in it for 3+ years on a job a couple years back. In fact, I'm considering selling my house, moving into my RV full time, retiring....and just going fishing.
 

That is a lot of great info. I must have been typing this while you were typing yours.





ETA: I do have the transmission temp gauge built in.
I mistakenly called my 6.2 liter engine a 5.3 liter. You're gonna need something quite a bit lighter than what I pull. My 6.2 will do it but it's borderline on long hills. It has the hp but the transmission heats up fairly quickly. Bad juju, that.





 
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 9:25:10 AM EST
[#41]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


PCSUTTON. I just bought that controller. How long have tyou had it? Any issues with it so far?



And OP. I would try to stay as lite as possible. Bottom line tow package or not, Its still a half ton truck. Not to say it cant pull it, but stopping it is still a concern. We are currently pulling a 24ft HFS XLR with a 2015 F150 4x4. Ford claims the truck will pull almost 12k, and it does, pulls it fine.. But you know its back there when the wind picks up. We are running a WDH as well. We just bought an excursion to take over on towing though. I just feel better with a heavier duty truck pulling it.
View Quote
I bought it in about 2012 and have had nothing but good luck with it. I even wired it in myself.



 
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 9:53:05 AM EST
[#42]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I mistakenly called my 6.2 liter engine a 5.3 liter. You're gonna need something quite a bit lighter than what I pull. My 6.2 will do it but it's borderline on long hills. It has the hp but the transmission heats up fairly quickly. Bad juju, that.
 
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I have a 26' (29' w/ trailer tongue) Forest River Grey Wolf. I pull it with a 2015 Silverado 1500 (5.3L) that has the tow package and I believe the trailer weighs around 6,000-7,000 and it does it with ease. Does your truck have the built in trailer brake package? That makes it so much cleaner and simpler not having to install an aftermarket brake controller.

Things to consider on towing a travel trailer:

-get a good weight distribution system; helps with sway, bouncing, and puts weight back on the trailer
-airbags, not necessary but I just had some installed and it keeps the truck level and keeps my OCD under control



Not sure if it has the brake package, but it does have the "haul mode" so it changes the shift points and uses the engine to brake. According to the built sheet (provided by an ARCOM member) I have the PDU, Z85, and Z82 upgrades. So H.D. cooling, towing suspension, H.D. towing equipment.
My rig is set up very similar to what you say yours has. I have a 5.3 litre - 400 hp Yukon Denali and pull a 2011 28' Keystone Zinger - which I bought new. I find 70 mph on the interstate easy to do.


There are brake controllers out now that read g-forces and convert them to braking force. I run a Tekonsha P3. Pretty much state of the art.
http://www.capitalhitch.com/images/tekonsha_p3.jpg

Bear in mind towing weight includes all the stuff loaded in/on the trailer and in your truck. You can have a 6,000lb trailer but if you carry 1500lbs of water, food, a generator, gas, beer, etc., you now have a 7,500lb trailer.

For tag-along trailers, a weight distributing/load stabilizing hitch is a must. The spring bars stop 'sway' on the highway and allows you to level the load front to back. I think my hitch setup ran about $800.00. It also needs to be 'set-up' on the first use. My setup is identical to this one:

http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/towing-weight-distribution-3.jpg


Using an automatic transmission in towing something as heavy as an RV requires changing the fluid and filter about every 3,000 miles of towing as the extra heat is really hard on ATF. If your vehicle doesn't have a transmission temperature display built in your going to need a transmission temperature gauge of some sort. You don't want your automatic transmission to get above about 240* and ~220* is optimum. I do keep a close eye on my temps, especially when pulling hills.

I use my RV as a portable office for long-term remote jobs so I carry a lot of extra stuff in it. Hell, I lived in it for 3+ years on a job a couple years back. In fact, I'm considering selling my house, moving into my RV full time, retiring....and just going fishing.


 



That is a lot of great info. I must have been typing this while you were typing yours.

ETA: I do have the transmission temp gauge built in.
I mistakenly called my 6.2 liter engine a 5.3 liter. You're gonna need something quite a bit lighter than what I pull. My 6.2 will do it but it's borderline on long hills. It has the hp but the transmission heats up fairly quickly. Bad juju, that.
 


So keeping total weight (trailer, everything in trailer, stuff in truck bed, and people) under 6500lbs.?
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 10:08:31 AM EST
[#43]




Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
So keeping total weight (trailer, everything in trailer, stuff in truck bed, and people) under 6500lbs.?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:                                                                                                                                                                             My rig is set up very similar to what you say yours has. I have a 5.3 litre - 400 hp Yukon Denali and pull a 2011 28' Keystone Zinger - which I bought new. I find 70 mph on the interstate easy to do.
There are brake controllers out now that read g-forces and convert them to braking force. I run a Tekonsha P3. Pretty much state of the art.




http://www.capitalhitch.com/images/tekonsha_p3.jpg









Bear in mind towing weight includes all the stuff loaded in/on the trailer and in your truck. You can have a 6,000lb trailer but if you carry 1500lbs of water, food, a generator, gas, beer, etc., you now have a 7,500lb trailer.
For tag-along trailers, a weight distributing/load stabilizing hitch is a must. The spring bars stop 'sway' on the highway and allows you to level the load front to back. I think my hitch setup ran about $800.00. It also needs to be 'set-up' on the first use. My setup is identical to this one:
http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/towing-weight-distribution-3.jpg
Using an automatic transmission in towing something as heavy as an RV requires changing the fluid and filter about every 3,000 miles of towing as the extra heat is really hard on ATF. If your vehicle doesn't have a transmission temperature display built in your going to need a transmission temperature gauge of some sort. You don't want your automatic transmission to get above about 240* and ~220* is optimum. I do keep a close eye on my temps, especially when pulling hills.
I use my RV as a portable office for long-term remote jobs so I carry a lot of extra stuff in it. Hell, I lived in it for 3+ years on a job a couple years back. In fact, I'm considering selling my house, moving into my RV full time, retiring....and just going fishing.




 
That is a lot of great info. I must have been typing this while you were typing yours.
ETA: I do have the transmission temp gauge built in.



I mistakenly called my 6.2 liter engine a 5.3 liter. You're gonna need something quite a bit lighter than what I pull. My 6.2 will do it but it's borderline on long hills. It has the hp but the transmission heats up fairly quickly. Bad juju, that.




 

So keeping total weight (trailer, everything in trailer, stuff in truck bed, and people) under 6500lbs.?

Yup. You can hook up to your empty trailer with your empty truck and go to a truck stop scale and weigh it all. Gross vehicle weight.
You will also want to unhook your trailer and get the tongue weight while empty.
You will also want to weigh the tongue again with the trailer loaded. Now you will have an idea on how you want to pack your trailer to best balance it front to rear so as to not add a bunch of extra tongue weight. The idea is to keep the load's center of gravity just a skosh forward to minimize sway.
Now that you have your load balanced you can get your gross towing weight.






Incidentally, having an electric tongue jack will save lots and lots of cranking. Mine even has a remote.  








 



 
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 10:35:52 AM EST
[#44]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Yup. You can hook up to your empty trailer with your empty truck and go to a truck stop scale and weigh it all. Gross vehicle weight.

You will also want to unhook your trailer and get the tongue weight while empty.

You will also want to weigh the tongue again with the trailer loaded. Now you will have an idea on how you want to pack your trailer to best balance it front to rear so as to not add a bunch of extra tongue weight. The idea is to keep the load's center of gravity just a skosh forward to minimize sway.

Now that you have your load balanced you can get your gross towing weight.

Incidentally, having an electric tongue jack will save lots and lots of cranking. Mine even has a remote.  
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NzgwWDc4MA==/z/fH0AAOSwzrxUtbbI/$_35.JPG
 
 
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:                                                                                                                                                                             My rig is set up very similar to what you say yours has. I have a 5.3 litre - 400 hp Yukon Denali and pull a 2011 28' Keystone Zinger - which I bought new. I find 70 mph on the interstate easy to do.


There are brake controllers out now that read g-forces and convert them to braking force. I run a Tekonsha P3. Pretty much state of the art.
http://www.capitalhitch.com/images/tekonsha_p3.jpg

Bear in mind towing weight includes all the stuff loaded in/on the trailer and in your truck. You can have a 6,000lb trailer but if you carry 1500lbs of water, food, a generator, gas, beer, etc., you now have a 7,500lb trailer.

For tag-along trailers, a weight distributing/load stabilizing hitch is a must. The spring bars stop 'sway' on the highway and allows you to level the load front to back. I think my hitch setup ran about $800.00. It also needs to be 'set-up' on the first use. My setup is identical to this one:

http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/towing-weight-distribution-3.jpg


Using an automatic transmission in towing something as heavy as an RV requires changing the fluid and filter about every 3,000 miles of towing as the extra heat is really hard on ATF. If your vehicle doesn't have a transmission temperature display built in your going to need a transmission temperature gauge of some sort. You don't want your automatic transmission to get above about 240* and ~220* is optimum. I do keep a close eye on my temps, especially when pulling hills.

I use my RV as a portable office for long-term remote jobs so I carry a lot of extra stuff in it. Hell, I lived in it for 3+ years on a job a couple years back. In fact, I'm considering selling my house, moving into my RV full time, retiring....and just going fishing.


 


That is a lot of great info. I must have been typing this while you were typing yours.

ETA: I do have the transmission temp gauge built in.
I mistakenly called my 6.2 liter engine a 5.3 liter. You're gonna need something quite a bit lighter than what I pull. My 6.2 will do it but it's borderline on long hills. It has the hp but the transmission heats up fairly quickly. Bad juju, that.
 


So keeping total weight (trailer, everything in trailer, stuff in truck bed, and people) under 6500lbs.?
Yup. You can hook up to your empty trailer with your empty truck and go to a truck stop scale and weigh it all. Gross vehicle weight.

You will also want to unhook your trailer and get the tongue weight while empty.

You will also want to weigh the tongue again with the trailer loaded. Now you will have an idea on how you want to pack your trailer to best balance it front to rear so as to not add a bunch of extra tongue weight. The idea is to keep the load's center of gravity just a skosh forward to minimize sway.

Now that you have your load balanced you can get your gross towing weight.

Incidentally, having an electric tongue jack will save lots and lots of cranking. Mine even has a remote.  
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NzgwWDc4MA==/z/fH0AAOSwzrxUtbbI/$_35.JPG
 
 



I can agree with the power jack.. We are looking for one right now... Def a worthy purchase
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 10:41:11 AM EST
[#45]
According to the wife, this is the front runner. I can't complain as it has the setup we like, but that fireplace is a waste, but from what I see on Coachmen's site it is standard with this model.

Coachmen 243RBS

Dry weight is 5700lbs.

ETA: how do you find out if the trailer has brakes built in? Never mind I found the internet. I guess anything over 2,000lbs will have brakes.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 1:09:27 PM EST
[#46]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
1/2T truck

20-23' lightweight trailer
Good equalizer hitch
Top quality electronic brake controller
Transmission cooler if tow is an automatic
MAYBE a small generator 1000w or 2000w inverter type like a Honda EU2000i
View Quote



I was reading some of the manuals and it seems like some of them have generators built in.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 2:19:05 PM EST
[#47]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



I was reading some of the manuals and it seems like some of them have generators built in.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
1/2T truck

20-23' lightweight trailer
Good equalizer hitch
Top quality electronic brake controller
Transmission cooler if tow is an automatic
MAYBE a small generator 1000w or 2000w inverter type like a Honda EU2000i



I was reading some of the manuals and it seems like some of them have generators built in.


Some of the trailers do have on board generators.. The price of the trailer usually jumps a few k then... I know we was looking at that option and it jumped the price up almost 6k.. We opted to buy our own and just plug it in to the main electric plug.. Depending on which generator you go with, its quite a bit cheaper than the factory installed option.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 2:48:35 PM EST
[#48]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Some of the trailers do have on board generators.. The price of the trailer usually jumps a few k then... I know we was looking at that option and it jumped the price up almost 6k.. We opted to buy our own and just plug it in to the main electric plug.. Depending on which generator you go with, its quite a bit cheaper than the factory installed option.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
1/2T truck

20-23' lightweight trailer
Good equalizer hitch
Top quality electronic brake controller
Transmission cooler if tow is an automatic
MAYBE a small generator 1000w or 2000w inverter type like a Honda EU2000i



I was reading some of the manuals and it seems like some of them have generators built in.


Some of the trailers do have on board generators.. The price of the trailer usually jumps a few k then... I know we was looking at that option and it jumped the price up almost 6k.. We opted to buy our own and just plug it in to the main electric plug.. Depending on which generator you go with, its quite a bit cheaper than the factory installed option.


I'd buy two Honda EU2000's (or similar) and a parallel cord. They're quiet, light enough to easily move, they can be carried in the truck bed or trailer AND you can use them for other situations where you don't have/want/need the entire trailer.
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 2:49:21 PM EST
[#49]
I bought a travel trailer to use as my portable hotel at the job sites away from home. I should have done this 10 years ago. I travel every week for work so, it's worth it. Per diem pays for the camper, and I still have plenty left over.

Would not currently recommend any Forest River product. I should have bought the Jayco I was looking at, but the dealer was in another state.

Bought mine new last year and it's been at the dealer having several warranty items fixed. It's been in the shop over 4 months right now.

I tried finding something used, but there was only a $5K difference between what I wanted used and what a new one costs.

Check out these RV Wholesalers to get a ballpark price for new units.

https://www.couchsrvnation.com/
http://www.rvwholesalers.com/
http://www.rvdirect.com/?gclid=CIfnj-rJr8wCFYdehgodR1ULyQ
Link Posted: 4/27/2016 3:33:48 PM EST
[#50]
Fishing Chitna, Alaska.



The road in/out of the fishing hole is the 2nd one behind my trailer in front of that knob.  It's one-lane, steep, bumpy and loose gravel.  Get a bit of run at it.






Page / 74
Close Join Our Mail List to Stay Up To Date! Win a FREE Membership!

Sign up for the ARFCOM weekly newsletter and be entered to win a free ARFCOM membership. One new winner* is announced every week!

You will receive an email every Friday morning featuring the latest chatter from the hottest topics, breaking news surrounding legislation, as well as exclusive deals only available to ARFCOM email subscribers.


By signing up you agree to our User Agreement. *Must have a registered ARFCOM account to win.
Top Top