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Link Posted: 3/30/2010 10:09:32 AM EST
[#1]



Quoted:


aluminum.  there is a problem with all aluminum in that it has a finite endurance limit.  what this means is no matter how slight the repetitive stress, all aluminum will fail.  take for example valve springs on a car, these cycle once every two engine revolutions and considering the engine must last at least 100k miles at about 2500 revolutions per mile, that means  125 million cycles.  valve spring failure is very rare because they are designed for a stress well below the infinite limit which most steels have.  but aluminum has no infinite stress limit.



this part of the pistol is not only highly stressed, it is also subject to notching from the cylinder gap.  so most have a hard steel alloy shield.  if that fails, the aluminum will become eroded and this induces a stress concentration area.





In this case, the frame is Titanium.



 
missing
Link Posted: 3/30/2010 10:13:13 AM EST
[#2]
Quoted:

Quoted:
aluminum.  there is a problem with all aluminum in that it has a finite endurance limit.  what this means is no matter how slight the repetitive stress, all aluminum will fail.  take for example valve springs on a car, these cycle once every two engine revolutions and considering the engine must last at least 100k miles at about 2500 revolutions per mile, that means  125 million cycles.  valve spring failure is very rare because they are designed for a stress well below the infinite limit which most steels have.  but aluminum has no infinite stress limit.

this part of the pistol is not only highly stressed, it is also subject to notching from the cylinder gap.  so most have a hard steel alloy shield.  if that fails, the aluminum will become eroded and this induces a stress concentration area.


In this case, the frame is Titanium.
 


I don't think you're correct about that.
Link Posted: 3/30/2010 10:13:26 AM EST
[#3]
Shoulda bought a Ruger.  
Link Posted: 3/30/2010 10:18:01 AM EST
[#4]
Quoted:
I have a 329PD; I would like to know what happened to that revolver.

I know that the blast shield at the barrel/cylinder gap can fall out; if he kept shooting with it missing I can see it eating through the topstrap and causing this.


My guess.
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 3:55:20 AM EST
[#5]
Quoted:
Quoted:

In this case, the frame is Titanium.
 


I don't think you're correct about that.



From S&W's Site "Smith & Wesson combined a Scandium alloy frame with a Titanium cylinder to build the strongest and lightest weight .44 Magnum revolver made."
They don't specify what the other component of the alloy is, but it would most likely be Aluminum.

After (admittedly, very little) research, mostly on wiki...it seems the most common use for Scandium is to add it to Aluminum for strength.

My 340SC, the older model, is a handful with .38 loads and is down right unpleasant to shoot with .357 loads. I would hazard to guess that the 329PD is absolutely unruly and painful to shoot.
Having said that....I'd love to have one.
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 4:06:32 AM EST
[#6]
Quoted:
A newer S&W sending its barrel downrange. Like that's never happened before.

Typical S&W quality nowadays.

If you want a good DA revolver, buy vintage or buy Ruger.


S&W used to make basically perfect guns, the quality level was amazing. Right up until about 1995 or so.  

People need to understand this: the gun manufacturers have completely run out of innovations to get gun buyers excited enough to buy a new gun.  So they come up with "improvements" that look good on paper but are fucking retarded.

Like ultra-light magnum guns.  or lever guns that fire incredo-recoiling cartridges.   or regular commercial guns recycled into dorky tacticool mode.  or handguns that fire 50 bmg.

this airweight 44 mag is about the stoopidest idea i ever saw.  completely absurd waste of money.
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 4:07:38 AM EST
[#7]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:

In this case, the frame is Titanium.
 


I don't think you're correct about that.



From S&W's Site "Smith & Wesson combined a Scandium alloy frame with a Titanium cylinder to build the strongest and lightest weight .44 Magnum revolver made."
They don't specify what the other component of the alloy is, but it would most likely be Aluminum.

After (admittedly, very little) research, mostly on wiki...it seems the most common use for Scandium is to add it to Aluminum for strength.

My 340SC, the older model, is a handful with .38 loads and is down right unpleasant to shoot with .357 loads. I would hazard to guess that the 329PD is absolutely unruly and painful to shoot.
Having said that....I'd love to have one.


Scandium alloy frames are basically aluminum with extremely small amounts of scandium added to the alloy.
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 4:46:15 AM EST
[#8]
Quoted:
Quoted:

Quoted:
Any idea as to what caused the .44 to KB?

If I had to guess it would be that there was a hairline fracture or something caused previously by who knows what. The shots sounded normal and then one was really loud.  
It was not a squib. It also was not a blockage issue.


Given that it was an airweight, I have to wonder if he was able to tell the difference between a KB and a normal discharge

44 mag out of an airweight probably feels like a KB every shot


Probably more common than it seems-non-steel frame+magnum caliber=KB waiting to happen.
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 4:53:10 AM EST
[#9]
Quoted:
Quoted:
A newer S&W sending its barrel downrange. Like that's never happened before.

Typical S&W quality nowadays.

If you want a good DA revolver, buy vintage or buy Ruger.


S&W used to make basically perfect guns, the quality level was amazing. Right up until about 1995 or so.  

People need to understand this: the gun manufacturers have completely run out of innovations to get gun buyers excited enough to buy a new gun.  So they come up with "improvements" that look good on paper but are fucking retarded.

Like ultra-light magnum guns.  or lever guns that fire incredo-recoiling cartridges.   or regular commercial guns recycled into dorky tacticool mode.  or handguns that fire 50 bmg.

this airweight 44 mag is about the stoopidest idea i ever saw.  completely absurd waste of money.


While there is some truth in your post, the airweight 357s caught my interested because nothing else is as light & small, yet can pack as much punch as my 340PD.  The snubbies in 38 just can't muster the same power as the 357 - or even the 9mm.

Link Posted: 4/2/2010 4:54:53 AM EST
[#10]
Front fell off
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 5:12:42 AM EST
[#11]
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 5:17:45 AM EST
[#12]
Meh, a little superglue and that'll buff right out
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 5:18:17 AM EST
[#13]


Looks like he might have slammed a cheap mag home on an open bolt.

Link Posted: 4/2/2010 5:25:36 AM EST
[#14]
I think that part needs to be attached to the gun in order for it to work correctly.
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 5:26:07 AM EST
[#15]





Quoted:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-QNAwUdHUQ





Never miss an opportunity to post this.




 



 WIN!





 
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 5:37:04 AM EST
[#16]



Quoted:


And, to top it all off, he even missed the bottle.




http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o266/razor11056/05.jpg





I would imagine lighting that 44 off gave him one hell of a flinch!

 
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 5:39:07 AM EST
[#17]
Quoted:

Quoted:




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-QNAwUdHUQ

Never miss an opportunity to post this.
 

 WIN!
 


How is this the first time that I've seen this?  You guys are slacking.
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 5:51:56 AM EST
[#18]
Quoted:
The outdoor range I worked at had holes in the roof, holes in the benches, even holes through a chair  (A shooter was at a bench, seated, shooting a snubby .38.  The guy to his left was shooting a .45 and one of the .45 empties went down the back of this guys' shirt.  The guy immediately reached back between his shoulderblades while still holding the .38.   He squeezed a round off and it missed giving him an ultimate back-scratching by about an inch.  Bullet went through the back of the folding metal chair he was sitting on and richocheted off the concrete deck, going up through a wooden range table and out through the sheet-metal roof.

The shooter said it was the ranges' fault, we had him too close to a guy shooting a semi-automatic, he tried to sue us, saying semi-auto's shouldn't be allowed cause hot brass could hurt someone.


I dealt with an asshole like that once on a range. The Fudd was at a bench about 2-3 spaces over, plugging away with his 1-shot every 5 minutes from his T/C pistol and I was at my bench with my Springfield 1911. I even put up a brass screen, but every few shots, a stray casing would make it over the top of the screen and land next to him. He got all offended and raised hell with the RO, and how I was breaking the rules by letting my brass land on his table. I just shrugged my shoulders, told him it was a semi-auto and WTF was I supposed to do beyond putting up a screen, and went back to shooting. Its an open air range, brass is going to go flying around and it is something you just deal with. I've been pelted with all kinds of brass over the years. The worst was some .308 brass from a FAL, but I didn't go whine to the RO about that big evil black rifle.

Link Posted: 4/2/2010 5:52:06 AM EST
[#19]



Quoted:



Quoted:

The front fail off.




Wasn't this one built so the front wouldn't fall off?
Apparently not





 
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 6:57:30 AM EST
[#20]



Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:


Quoted:



In this case, the frame is Titanium.

 




I don't think you're correct about that.






From S&W's Site "Smith & Wesson combined a Scandium alloy frame with a Titanium cylinder to build the strongest and lightest weight .44 Magnum revolver made."

They don't specify what the other component of the alloy is, but it would most likely be Aluminum.



After (admittedly, very little) research, mostly on wiki...it seems the most common use for Scandium is to add it to Aluminum for strength.



My 340SC, the older model, is a handful with .38 loads and is down right unpleasant to shoot with .357 loads. I would hazard to guess that the 329PD is absolutely unruly and painful to shoot.

Having said that....I'd love to have one.




Scandium alloy frames are basically aluminum with extremely small amounts of scandium added to the alloy.


Regardless, cardboard is out.



 
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 7:18:53 AM EST
[#21]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
A newer S&W sending its barrel downrange. Like that's never happened before.

Typical S&W quality nowadays.

If you want a good DA revolver, buy vintage or buy Ruger.


S&W used to make basically perfect guns, the quality level was amazing. Right up until about 1995 or so.  

People need to understand this: the gun manufacturers have completely run out of innovations to get gun buyers excited enough to buy a new gun.  So they come up with "improvements" that look good on paper but are fucking retarded.

Like ultra-light magnum guns.  or lever guns that fire incredo-recoiling cartridges.   or regular commercial guns recycled into dorky tacticool mode.  or handguns that fire 50 bmg.

this airweight 44 mag is about the stoopidest idea i ever saw.  completely absurd waste of money.


While there is some truth in your post, the airweight 357s caught my interested because nothing else is as light & small, yet can pack as much punch as my 340PD.  The snubbies in 38 just can't muster the same power as the 357 - or even the 9mm.



You're missing the part about "shootability" .

Recoil and muzzle blast are serious "issues" to deal with.

You have to consider what guns you can pass the "paper plate" test with 100% of the time.

A hit with a 38 is way better than a miss with a 357.

Nowadays, another factor is ammo cost.  If the ammo costs too much to practice with often the gun's usefulness is diminished greatly.

It's all about hitting the target, safety and reliability.  Everything else is secondary to those three things.
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 8:13:15 AM EST
[#22]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
A newer S&W sending its barrel downrange. Like that's never happened before.

Typical S&W quality nowadays.

If you want a good DA revolver, buy vintage or buy Ruger.


S&W used to make basically perfect guns, the quality level was amazing. Right up until about 1995 or so.  

People need to understand this: the gun manufacturers have completely run out of innovations to get gun buyers excited enough to buy a new gun.  So they come up with "improvements" that look good on paper but are fucking retarded.

Like ultra-light magnum guns.  or lever guns that fire incredo-recoiling cartridges.   or regular commercial guns recycled into dorky tacticool mode.  or handguns that fire 50 bmg.

this airweight 44 mag is about the stoopidest idea i ever saw.  completely absurd waste of money.


While there is some truth in your post, the airweight 357s caught my interested because nothing else is as light & small, yet can pack as much punch as my 340PD.  The snubbies in 38 just can't muster the same power as the 357 - or even the 9mm.



You're missing the part about "shootability" .

Recoil and muzzle blast are serious "issues" to deal with.

You have to consider what guns you can pass the "paper plate" test with 100% of the time.

A hit with a 38 is way better than a miss with a 357.

Nowadays, another factor is ammo cost.  If the ammo costs too much to practice with often the gun's usefulness is diminished greatly.

It's all about hitting the target, safety and reliability.  Everything else is secondary to those three things.


Considering the real-world defensive ranges for shootings in and around this part of the country (typically 1 to 3 feet) and the large amount of practice I do at that range, I am confident with my gun choice.   If my life is REALLY on the line, it will not be about measuring group size.

Link Posted: 4/2/2010 12:37:04 PM EST
[#23]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
A newer S&W sending its barrel downrange. Like that's never happened before.

Typical S&W quality nowadays.

If you want a good DA revolver, buy vintage or buy Ruger.


S&W used to make basically perfect guns, the quality level was amazing. Right up until about 1995 or so.  

People need to understand this: the gun manufacturers have completely run out of innovations to get gun buyers excited enough to buy a new gun.  So they come up with "improvements" that look good on paper but are fucking retarded.

Like ultra-light magnum guns.  or lever guns that fire incredo-recoiling cartridges.   or regular commercial guns recycled into dorky tacticool mode.  or handguns that fire 50 bmg.

this airweight 44 mag is about the stoopidest idea i ever saw.  completely absurd waste of money.


While there is some truth in your post, the airweight 357s caught my interested because nothing else is as light & small, yet can pack as much punch as my 340PD.  The snubbies in 38 just can't muster the same power as the 357 - or even the 9mm.



You're missing the part about "shootability" .

Recoil and muzzle blast are serious "issues" to deal with.

You have to consider what guns you can pass the "paper plate" test with 100% of the time.

A hit with a 38 is way better than a miss with a 357.

Nowadays, another factor is ammo cost.  If the ammo costs too much to practice with often the gun's usefulness is diminished greatly.

It's all about hitting the target, safety and reliability.  Everything else is secondary to those three things.


Considering the real-world defensive ranges for shootings in and around this part of the country (typically 1 to 3 feet) and the large amount of practice I do at that range, I am confident with my gun choice.   If my life is REALLY on the line, it will not be about measuring group size.



meh, I'd want to be able to shoot the thing at least 10 yards.  paper plate test, not group size
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 1:06:40 PM EST
[#24]
I'm not a gunsmith, but I don't think that will buff out.
Link Posted: 4/2/2010 1:50:47 PM EST
[#25]
The front fell off was the first thing that came to mind when I saw the pictures

Link Posted: 4/2/2010 1:58:47 PM EST
[#26]





Quoted:



I took six guns and two brothers and one sister. Went through about 800 rounds of wolf 5.56, 300 rounds of Winchester .45, two or three hundred of .38 spl, some .22 long and .22 mags.






Pretty good day, did some drills with their computer programs.







About halfway through I noticed a barrel lying in the lane....not attached to a gun. The guy next to me was firing factory winchester. Hmmmmm


No injuries.







Good day at the range. Everything of mine ran flawlessly too until the end. My brother somehow managed to double feed it, and one of the round is now stuck above the BCG. Unsure how to proceed.....


Edit: I fixed it, thanks.


















UPDATED PICS FROM OWNER (there are more but photobucket is being weird)





http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o266/razor11056/dsc_0003.jpg


http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o266/razor11056/dsc_0004.jpg


http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o266/razor11056/dsc_0015-1.jpg


http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o266/razor11056/dsc_0034.jpg


http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o266/razor11056/dsc_0021-1.jpg


http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o266/razor11056/dsc_0010.jpg
Glad you fixed it. What kind of mags are you using? A double feed like that is probably the result of a magazine with shitty feed lips that isn't holding rounds inside it properly. Had it happen before with a cheap POS USA mag that I got for free with my AR15 10 years ago. My friend had it happen to him with an Orlite mag with a feedlip that broke while shooting with it.
 
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 3:02:56 PM EST
[#27]
ARFCOM THREAD


When I posted that mine was cutting through in Feb 09 I got called all kinds of lier.






NOI
Link Posted: 5/17/2010 3:11:41 PM EST
[#28]
Quoted:
Quoted:
A newer S&W sending its barrel downrange. Like that's never happened before.

Typical S&W quality nowadays.

If you want a good DA revolver, buy vintage or buy Ruger.





You must have a short memory. Here is just one example of modern S&W quality:

N.C. wants Smith & Wesson to replace faulty revolvers
RALEIGH, N.C.
The Associated Press Faced with problems ranging from misfires to barrels breaking off, the state has asked gun maker Smith & Wesson to replace hundreds of sidearms carried by probation and corrections officers.
None of the revolvers have failed in the line of duty, and for now, the department is keeping the guns in service. But in testing, about one in four revolvers didn't fire when the trigger was pulled. In some cases, the barrel of some models broke off when the gun was fired.
"In one sense it's funny," said Chief Deputy Correction Secretary Dan Stieneke. "In another, it's alarming."
So far, the state Correction Department has asked the Massachusetts-based gun maker to replace only 500 Model 64 revolvers bought in 2004, though there have also been problems with two other models. But officials could wind up asking Smith & Wesson to provide replacements for all 5,000 of the department's revolvers.
At a meeting last month at a shooting range in Smithfield, Smith & Wesson representative got a live demonstration of the problems. During test firing of about three dozen revolvers, four misfired, meaning nothing happened when the trigger was pulled. The barrel also broke off a different model when it was fired, something that has happened 14 times in practice firings since 2003.
"On the one hand, statistically (the revolvers' performance) is not bad, but it's just the safety issue," Stieneke said. "That kind of failure gets people's attention."
Officials at Springfield, Mass.-based Smith & Wesson, one of the world's largest gun makers, did not return repeated calls seeking comment.
For at least two decades, state prison officials have used Smith & Wesson revolvers. They are assigned to probation officers and correction officers who work outside of prison walls, patrolling perimeters and escorting inmates. The guns are not carried by officers who work inside prisons, where there is too great a risk of inmates getting a gun.
The guns cost about $320 each, meaning it would cost the state more than $1.5 million to replace them all. That doesn't include the cost of buying new ammunition, holsters and other accessories, plus retraining officers to use a new model of gun.
"We're at a point where if we have to make a quick switch, it's going to cost millions of dollars, and it's going to take a lot of training and effort to get back up to speed," Stieneke said.
Many law enforcement agencies have moved away from revolvers in recent years, switching to semiautomatic pistols, something Stieneke is considering.
___
Information from: The News & Observer,
Copyright 2006 - The Fayetteville (NC) Observer
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 2:00:57 AM EST
[#29]










That's a brass whore's dream.  Guessing they let you retrieve your brass (and others)?


Link Posted: 5/18/2010 2:09:03 AM EST
[#30]

Link Posted: 5/18/2010 2:22:01 AM EST
[#31]
My personal 44's are now exclusively either Ruger or Dan Wessons. They'll take the full house reloads with todays modern powders all day long without going out of time or blowing off the top strap unlike many other brands that are available.
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 2:29:15 AM EST
[#32]




Quoted:

The front fail off.


You fell at spelling.

Link Posted: 5/18/2010 2:31:47 AM EST
[#33]
Just a little duct tape and it'll be fine.
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 2:41:33 AM EST
[#34]



Quoted:


aluminum.  there is a problem with all aluminum in that it has a finite endurance limit.  what this means is no matter how slight the repetitive stress, all aluminum will fail.  take for example valve springs on a car, these cycle once every two engine revolutions and considering the engine must last at least 100k miles at about 2500 revolutions per mile, that means  125 million cycles.  valve spring failure is very rare because they are designed for a stress well below the infinite limit which most steels have.  but aluminum has no infinite stress limit.



this part of the pistol is not only highly stressed, it is also subject to notching from the cylinder gap.  so most have a hard steel alloy shield.  if that fails, the aluminum will become eroded and this induces a stress concentration area.







I have personally owned two of the Smith 'wonder' Lite revolvers.  Both of them failed beyond repair.  In both instances the frames became worn to the point of being so out of spec that they could not be safely fired, and the cylinders would fall right off the crane.  





 
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 3:31:37 AM EST
[#35]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Quoted:
Why does it appear that there are bullet strikes on the range walls, the overhead baffles, and one of the target carriers??


I'm no expert but I bet it's because there are bullet strikes on the range walls, overhead baffles, and one of the target carriers.  

I haven't been to a lot of indoor ranges but every one I've been to had idiots marks like that all over it.  

This range is a members only range, and I feel MUCH more comfortable at this range than ANY other indoor range I have EVER been to. I've never seen any half-wits or hooligans or blatantly unsafe behavior at this range, which is extremely unusual at a public range. I don't go to public indoor ranges any more.  


I never go to indoor public ranges!
My friends do, and they tell me all these goofy horror stories of idiots just not knowing what they are doing.
The worst story was that a guy was shooting for awhile, then decided his gun worked ok, so he shot himself in the head.
The entire gun range, of course, was locked down, and the police confiscated everybody's guns, to make sure nobody else shot him.
They kept all the guns for a month or so, until they decided the suicide note that he left at home must have been real.




Link Posted: 5/18/2010 3:40:27 AM EST
[#36]
So instead of a shoulder thing that goes up, it had a front thing that fell off?
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 3:47:20 AM EST
[#37]
Quoted:
Quoted:
The outdoor range I worked at had holes in the roof, holes in the benches, even holes through a chair  (A shooter was at a bench, seated, shooting a snubby .38.  The guy to his left was shooting a .45 and one of the .45 empties went down the back of this guys' shirt.  The guy immediately reached back between his shoulderblades while still holding the .38.   He squeezed a round off and it missed giving him an ultimate back-scratching by about an inch.  Bullet went through the back of the folding metal chair he was sitting on and richocheted off the concrete deck, going up through a wooden range table and out through the sheet-metal roof.

The shooter said it was the ranges' fault, we had him too close to a guy shooting a semi-automatic, he tried to sue us, saying semi-auto's shouldn't be allowed cause hot brass could hurt someone.


Fucking pussy.


This.

I have had hot 5.56, .45, 9, and .22 ALL go down my shirt or land on my neck, etc.  Yeah it burns... for a second.  Certainly not worthy of that sort of reaction.  Some people are fucking useless.
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 4:19:18 AM EST
[#38]
I'm beginning to wonder about WWB ammo.
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 4:31:34 AM EST
[#39]
So, do you hate field stripping your Ruger 22 pistol as much as I do mine (22/45)?
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 4:38:03 AM EST
[#40]
Quoted:
So, do you hate field stripping your Ruger 22 pistol as much as I do mine (22/45)?


They all suck to disassemble. I have had the 22/45 MKII and a MKIII new style. I will spray the crap out of them with the bolt held open, I refuse to take those bastards apart.
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 4:41:42 AM EST
[#41]
Quoted:

this airweight 44 mag is about the stoopidest idea i ever saw.  completely absurd waste of money.


Dude, it's an almost perfect pistol for hiking in bear country. My bro lives in Seattle and just got one for just that reason. It's replacing a Ruger Super Blackhawk and he says the weight difference was immediately noticeable on his last hike.

I did advise him to NOT use the Buffalo Bore 340gn hard cast rounds I got him. It's CLEARLY marked on them "For Ruger Pistols Only"
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 4:49:21 AM EST
[#42]
I am going to say Flame Cutting killed that revolver..
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 4:51:26 AM EST
[#43]
Quoted:
Quoted:

this airweight 44 mag is about the stoopidest idea i ever saw.  completely absurd waste of money.


Dude, it's an almost perfect pistol for hiking in bear country. My bro lives in Seattle and just got one for just that reason. It's replacing a Ruger Super Blackhawk and he says the weight difference was immediately noticeable on his last hike.

I did advise him to NOT use the Corbon 325gn hard cast rounds I got him. It's CLEARLY marked on them "For Ruger Pistols Only"


let us see him pass the paper plate test with it.

you load up the gun and put a paper plate up at a given range.  however far out you can hit the plate 100% of the time is your maximum effective range

a 44 mag with a paper plate range of 5 yards is dumb.

these ultra lightweight short barrelled guns are a marketing gizmo to excite people enough to buy a new gun.


44 mag is the heaviest caliber that most people can be taught to shoot well in a reasonable period of time, i would say an airweight 44 mag falls off that chart.
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 4:57:28 AM EST
[#44]
Quoted:
I am going to say Flame Cutting killed that revolver..


look at the fracture surface on the top strap

looks to me like a clean break

as a civil engineer with some graduate study in materials, i call brittle fracture on that one

like a fatigue failure or an inclusion or imperfection at the top strap location
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 5:03:18 AM EST
[#45]
Pics of sister???
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 5:03:40 AM EST
[#46]
this airweight 44 mag is about the stoopidest idea i ever saw. completely absurd waste of money.


Didn't seem like a good idea to me either; 38Spec, OK - 44Mag...um no. Very easy to shoot fast and accurately as well.
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 5:12:07 AM EST
[#47]
Unpossible!!!!!!!!!  Smith makes the greatest guns since Glock first invented guns.  
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 5:14:45 AM EST
[#48]
Quoted:
aluminum.  there is a problem with all aluminum in that it has a finite endurance limit.  what this means is no matter how slight the repetitive stress, all aluminum will fail.  take for example valve springs on a car, these cycle once every two engine revolutions and considering the engine must last at least 100k miles at about 2500 revolutions per mile, that means  125 million cycles.  valve spring failure is very rare because they are designed for a stress well below the infinite limit which most steels have.  but aluminum has no infinite stress limit.




Thus the reason you only run aluminum connecting rods for a certain amount of time and then trash them............regardless of what x-ray shows (or doesn't show)

And I dont want a Scandium frame for anything above 38/357 levels of pressure ..........sorry.
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 6:13:47 AM EST
[#49]
I have replica 1858 Remington revolvers with .45 Colt conversion cylinders that I would trust more than that S&W alloy frame.
Link Posted: 5/18/2010 10:39:30 AM EST
[#50]
Quoted:
Any idea as to what caused the .44 to KB?


Front fell off.
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