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Link Posted: 11/27/2015 6:31:17 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming
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When you pour your soda and it foams up to the top, take your finger and wipe it on the side of your nose or your forehead, then dip your finger into the foam.  The foam will rapidly disappear.  This will not work if you just got out of the shower though....you need to be a little greasy in those areas for it to work
Link Posted: 11/28/2015 12:03:04 AM EST
Get a menstrual cycle app for your smartphone and plug in you lady's particulars. Now schedule accordingly.
Link Posted: 12/23/2015 11:09:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/2/2019 9:04:25 AM EST by Makarov]
Use wooden dowel rods like these;

and cheap pencil sharpener;


to make cheap, disposable, non-marring punches for tight fitting pieces that need a little coaxing. cut to length with a utility knife or handsaw, sharpen and then trim the sharpened end to exactly the diameter you need with a razor knife. Remove magazine floorplates, remove tight takedown pins on an AR, trigger pins on a shotgun, etc. You can also whittle the end into a wedge shape for prying parts without risk of damage to the part or the finish. The wood dowel will likely break long before you apply enough force to damage anything on the gun. A sharp point also makes a good pick to clean nooks and crannies, move springs around or apply a single drop of oil, Loc-Tite or any other liquid. Again, all without fear of damaging anything on the gun.
Link Posted: 1/22/2016 4:06:49 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming
View Quote


Nooooo, you pour the soda first, then add the ice.
Link Posted: 2/27/2016 2:03:39 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Household Goop is an excellent adhesive, it'll mend anything but a broken heart.

I have used it to extend the life of my duty boots. Build up the area where they are worn out and use 'em for another 5-6 months!

Anyone else have any "unusual" uses for Goop?

BTW it's also know as Super Shoe Goo.
View Quote



Shoe Goo is awesome. I use it to extend the life of shoes/boots too. Haven't figured out an AR use yet.
Link Posted: 3/3/2016 9:23:47 PM EST
Mock me now, thank me later...

I know it's a little silly, a lot un-tacti-cool, and slightly gay (and not in a good way, like that brave woman Caitlyn Jenner)

This is an idea I came up with because I have too many rifles with too many different scope set-ups to keep track of...I know, white people problems, right?

This is not for your Tier 1 HSLD operators or your low level Fudd with a 30-06 with a bead sight. It's for guys like me. Maybe you're like me? I dunno, so here it is...











Every scope is a different height above bore, and I zero different rifles at different ranges and I can't keep track of them. I know there are apps on my phone that do that stuff but I don't want to rely on tech or anything that can crash...so this is what I came up with to give me the basics for a particular rifle. I have the rifle's scope height above center bore, and then bullet drop for various distances. That's it, keep it simple.

10 pack of luggage tags off eBay for $4.99


roy d...dope with a scope
Link Posted: 3/4/2016 6:57:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BaconTurner:



Shoe Goo is awesome. I use it to extend the life of shoes/boots too. Haven't figured out an AR use yet.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BaconTurner:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Household Goop is an excellent adhesive, it'll mend anything but a broken heart.

I have used it to extend the life of my duty boots. Build up the area where they are worn out and use 'em for another 5-6 months!

Anyone else have any "unusual" uses for Goop?

BTW it's also know as Super Shoe Goo.



Shoe Goo is awesome. I use it to extend the life of shoes/boots too. Haven't figured out an AR use yet.


Gas buster mod?
Link Posted: 3/8/2016 10:03:23 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By joker1:


Gas buster mod?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By joker1:
Originally Posted By BaconTurner:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Household Goop is an excellent adhesive, it'll mend anything but a broken heart.

I have used it to extend the life of my duty boots. Build up the area where they are worn out and use 'em for another 5-6 months!

Anyone else have any "unusual" uses for Goop?

BTW it's also know as Super Shoe Goo.



Shoe Goo is awesome. I use it to extend the life of shoes/boots too. Haven't figured out an AR use yet.


Gas buster mod?

.
Possibly, but it sets up a little stiffer than silicone
Link Posted: 3/13/2016 1:40:08 PM EST
Read elsewhere about using Velcro to eliminate the wobble on collapsible stocks. Did it this past weekend and it works fairly well, though it requires you to put in a little more force than usual to adjust the stock afterwards.

I just took a strip of the fuzzy section (not the hooked section) and applied it to the top of the buffer tube. The adhesive on the Velcro tape is pretty strong, so it stays put pretty well. Then I went over it a few times with a lighter to melt the fuzz down a little until the stock could slide back over the tube. No more rattling.
Link Posted: 3/13/2016 2:10:45 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BaconTurner:
Read elsewhere about using Velcro to eliminate the wobble on collapsible stocks. Did it this past weekend and it works fairly well, though it requires you to put in a little more force than usual to adjust the stock afterwards.

I just took a strip of the fuzzy section (not the hooked section) and applied it to the top of the buffer tube. The adhesive on the Velcro tape is pretty strong, so it stays put pretty well. Then I went over it a few times with a lighter to melt the fuzz down a little until the stock could slide back over the tube. No more rattling.
View Quote


Sounds like a Commerical stock (larger diameter tube) on a Mil Spec (smaller dia) lower receiver extension.


CD
Link Posted: 3/13/2016 3:35:34 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Combat_Diver:


Sounds like a Commerical stock (larger diameter tube) on a Mil Spec (smaller dia) lower receiver extension.


CD
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Originally Posted By Combat_Diver:
Originally Posted By BaconTurner:
Read elsewhere about using Velcro to eliminate the wobble on collapsible stocks. Did it this past weekend and it works fairly well, though it requires you to put in a little more force than usual to adjust the stock afterwards.

I just took a strip of the fuzzy section (not the hooked section) and applied it to the top of the buffer tube. The adhesive on the Velcro tape is pretty strong, so it stays put pretty well. Then I went over it a few times with a lighter to melt the fuzz down a little until the stock could slide back over the tube. No more rattling.


Sounds like a Commerical stock (larger diameter tube) on a Mil Spec (smaller dia) lower receiver extension.


CD


That may have been the case; it was like that when I bought it. But the Velcro trick worked as a cheap solution.
Link Posted: 3/13/2016 4:04:46 PM EST
http://www.pachmayr.com/home/vindicator-pistol.php



The 12 ga Vindicator grip will fit a 20 ga 870 Youth w/ minor trimming by a pocket knife.  Makes for a handy car gun, particularly when you add this:

http://www.riflestock.com/store/do/product/01-04-33



This may be the better answer over the Vindicator these days, when I was first trimming plastic I don't believe it was available:

http://www.riflestock.com/store/do/product/01-01-60



Choate also has a couple of other folding options for the 20 ga 870:

http://www.riflestock.com/store/do/product/01-01-23

http://www.riflestock.com/store/do/product/01-09-12
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 9:05:02 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/22/2016 9:07:00 AM EST by DakotaFAL]
I'm going to put this here rather than having to repost it in the pistol caliber carbines section and/or link to its twin on Uzi Talk (where I also posted it) every time the question gets asked:


Adapting a military issue fixed wooden stock for an Uzi SMG to a civilian non-SBR Uzi carbine.

Genuine semi-auto wood stocks are hard to find for an Uzi and expensive when you find one.  In contrast, you can find a new wood stock for a full auto/SBR Uzi for $40 and you can find them in very good to excellent condition for $30.

The problem with using the full auto detachable wood stock is that the ATF requires a minimum OAL of 26" for rifles. Tele-stock and folding stock rifles are measured with the stock extended, so an OAL under 26" when folded is not a problem. However the ATF measures rifles with detachable stocks with the stock removed.  It's unfair, and actually pretty stupid when some folding stock rifles are shorter than the 23 1/8" length of an Uzi carbine sans stock, but it's the law.  Consequently, it's illegal to use the detachable stock if it is in fact still detachable without tools, unless you're using it on a registered SBR.  

A related problem you'll face if you plan to convert a wood stock for a full auto Uzi to a non-detachable configuration is the legal concept of "constructive possession". In simple terms, if you possess the parts to assemble an SBR and you have no legal means to assemble the parts, such as already having a registered SBR receiver, or a pistol receiver with a barrel 16" or longer to put them on, you are in possession of SBR even if you never intend to assemble the parts in that configuration.

Now, this is the kind of charge that normally only gets made in the course of a visit by law enforcement or the ATF for some other criminal activity that brought you to their attention, but it is illegal none the less and it poses a potential legal problem for someone wanting to do a conversion.  It's still constructive possession even if you have the parts in different locations, as you still have control and thus possession of the parts, so leaving the stock in one location and the rest of the rifle in another is still technically illegal.

In my case, I'm pretty anal about such things as I have a job that pays a lot of money but is based on having a security clearance that I'd lose with even a minor violation, so I err on the side of "safe".  

I found the adapter plate portion of the stock in a parts bin at a gun show, and thus could modify the part to a non-quick detachable configuration before I actually purchased the stock itself, and thus never had all the parts needed for an SBR in my possession.  

Enough of the legal disclaimer stuff... you've been warned, you know the rules and if you're a legal firearms owner you're by definition a responsible adult.


-----


The plate itself looks like this and comes with a stud that engages a hole in the back of the Uzi receiver.



You need to remove that stud to render the plate from being quickly attached and detached from an Uzi receiver.  You can grind it off, dremel it off, or just use a hacksaw and then clean it up with a file. I actually chose the latter low tech method as it posed the least risk of marring the rest of the plate.



In 1967 when IMI developed the Type 5 folding stock for the Uzi, they used a bushing that is inserted in the hole in the receiver and creates a stud on the back of the receiver to fit into a recess in the folding stock.  To convert a Type 1 thru 4 wood stock to a non-SBR Uzi, you need to shorten this bushing (or a replacement bushing) so that it is flush or slightly recessed in the rear of the receiver.  I opted for slightly recessed to prevent the need from grinding the stud on the stock plate fully flush. The 1/6" or so that is left of the stud is not sufficient to hold the plate on the receiver, so it's still legal.  




To be able to attach the plate to the receiver again, you need to drill a hole to accommodate the 1/4 - 20 stock screw.  This is the most critical portion of the conversion as you need to have it centered right to left as it needs to be inline with the holes in the adapter plate for everything to go together correctly. Measure it carefully and then center punch it so the drill bit won't wander.   I located my hole slightly low to take up the gap that normally exists at the back of the plate on a quick detachable stock as I didn't plan to use the spring loaded tension assembly and I anted a nice snug fit.



The stock adapter plate is milled to accommodate the heads for flush mounted screws that secure to inserts in the stock, but those screws are going the wrong way as you can't access them once you've screwed the plate to the receiver via the rear stock screw.  

Consequently, the final modification to the adapter plate is to tap the original holes drilled for the 10-32 screws for 1/4 NC 20 threads. The diameter at the base of the tapered holes is large enough to allow you to just tap them for thread directly with a 1/4 NC 20 tap with no need to upsize the hole first.   If you feel ambitious you could build up the holes first with a welder and get another thread's worth of purchase, but as is the plate is still thick enough to accommodate about 2 1/2 threads, and between the pair of larger screws it's strong enough to support the stock.

As you can see, the adapter plate still engages the "I" shaped attachment point on the receiver, but is screwed to the back of the receiver like the Type 5 folding stock, and is not removable without using an allen wrench, like the Type 5 stock, and like the semi-auto stocks action arms used to sell, thus making it ATF legal.




-------


At this point you're ready to buy yourself a stripped stock, butt plate and the three wood screw used in the stock.  You won't need any other gun parts.  

Once my stock and butt plate arrived via USPS, I attached the butt plate and I drilled a 3/8" hole in the front face to provide clearance for the stock screw that now protrudes behind the stock plate.



One unexpected snag however was that the angled tang prevented the stock from slipping over the screw, so I had to cut an angle to provide additional clearance.




The original machine screws (the ones that go the wrong way) appear to be about size 10 screws, so you'll need to enlarge the holes in the stock as well.   I found number 8 washers were a press fit in the holes in the stock, and I used a suitably sized to punch to set them in place, then upsized the holes in both the washers and stock to 1/4" to accommodate the larger 1/4-20 allen head screws. The washers give the allen head screws a little more area against the stock and protect the wood.  That helps prevent the wood from crushing and over time prevents the screws from contacting the bottom of the receiver.



I started with 1" long 1/4-20 screws and had to shorten them to .8" to prevent them from bearing against the bottom of the receiver.  That's 5 threads shorter if you don't have a pair of calipers.  In the end, you'll have two 1/4-20 screws and one wood screw that must be removed to detach the stock, and you'll have the shorter 1/4-20 screw to remove to take the stock plate off the receiver.  It's thus 400% more complicated to remove than the Type 5 stock. That'll keep the ATF happy.  



The payoff is a very securely mounted stock that does not have the play that is found in most of the quick detachable stocks, and it's fully ATF legal.  It's also a lot more comfortable than the Type 5 stock and provides a much more consistent cheek weld. If you're prior US military and are familiar with the nose to carry handle approach to consistent placement on the M16A1 or A2 stock, you'll be right at home with a Type 4 wood stock on an Uzi as you can place your nose against the back corner of the receiver in the same manner.   I've found it really helps you get the most out of the Uzi carbine's accuracy potential and 3"- 4" groups at 100 yards are the norm with good quality ammo, despite the crude aperture sights, once you've achieved a consistent cheek weld. The good accuracy (for a sub-gun) with the 16" barrel is one of the reasons I don't feel any particular need to SBR my Uzi Carbine.  If I ever do that, it will be because I've bought a suppressor for it, and the paper work for both will go in at the same time.    



This approach also preserves the (still movable but now non functional) quick release lever and the look of the original quick detachable stock.



Link Posted: 6/10/2016 10:57:54 PM EST
Flex Seal on grips? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6XKr1TXCFI
Link Posted: 1/20/2017 12:31:07 PM EST
Boresnake and tool storage. No pics so use your imagination.

On a whim I bought a few. 22 Chinese boresnakes off amazon because they were $2 shipped. They showed up 3 weeks later and look like the hoppes ones.

They are ridiculously long and I wanted it to fit in my tango down stubby vert grip. I cut right above where the pull string attaches to the rope. Next I cut the pull string down to where it would go through the barrel and hang out the muzzle far enough to wrap the end around my hand and pull it. I then sewed it back to the rope.

Next I cut the rope part that doubles back inside itself by pulling the outer rope all the way down to where the two pieces were sewn together. I cut it right above the stitch and pulled the rope out giving one long piece of rope.

Next I filled about a 2 inch section of the rope, right above the stitching where I just cut the rope free, with stuffing from a stuffed animal. This creates a "mop" behind the bore brush. I put a line of stitches right behind the mop to keep it from moving.

Finally, I cut the remaining rope off behind the mop and melted the fray together.

Now I have a small boresnake/mop that winds up small enough to fit inside my vert grip with room to spare.

Also a dremel wrench works on the LaRue qd mounts that have the tension nut, the screw driver end works to adjust the bootleg adjustable carrier, and when wrapped up tight inside the now small boresnake, they both fit in the vert grip. So much win.
Link Posted: 2/11/2017 6:42:00 PM EST
I've been wondering, for those AR takedown detents that keep getting launched - has anyone found if the metal tip of a ball point pen refill will work as a replacement in a pinch?
Link Posted: 4/23/2017 11:14:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/23/2017 11:15:40 PM EST by superjc]
If you own an M1A and a HK style rifle, but are too cheap to buy the HK G3 bolt tool, you can use your M1A castle nut pliers to
squeeze the G3 bolt locking tab (with the insane spring tension- screwdriver is kinda dangerous)

Link Posted: 5/13/2017 10:27:50 PM EST
Not sure if it's been mentioned, but if you use irons and a brass bead....

Polish the brass bead.  If you are a knife guy, then you probably have a strop laying around somewhere.  Green or white compound makes the bead really shine and stand out.  

Auto stores and 2000 grit sandpaper would probably have the same effect.
Link Posted: 5/15/2017 4:18:55 PM EST
I don't like storing my reloads loose so I take old ammo boxes and turn them inside out. Plenty of room to write load data, its free so I'm happy, and its recycling so the hippies are happy.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 11:52:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/1/2018 12:04:48 PM EST by Little_Scrapper]
6' Target stands for paper sillouette targets on the cheap. Get two stands for about $12. Takes about 30 minutes.

Go to Home Depot. Buy 2x 6' 2x4s, 8x 8" bolts with washers and wingnuts, a ten pac of cheap  8' 1x3's (pine).

If you dont have a saw have them do it at home depot for free. Cut the 2x4s in equal 2' lengts. Cut 2' off the 1x3s. Stack three 2x4's and 1 1x3 and drill 5 equally spaced holes through the center of the 4' face. Holes need to be big enough for the bolts to fit through. Next, on the 2x4s drill another hole into the 1.5" side all the way through across the 4" side. Make these two holes about 2" from each end of the 2x4. Now make an H pattern with the 2x4s with the board going across the others set on its edge. Run a bolt up through the center hole of the two flat boards and drop the cross board onto the bolts through the two holes in its edge. Wingnut tight your H base. Take two more bolts and run them through the #2 and #4 (or the #1 & 5 holes) holes of the crossing board and one of the 2' 1x3s. Take two if the 6' 1x3s and place them inbetween the two cross boards to make your upgights. Wignuts to lock everything together.

When you breakdown and stack the four baseboards the bolts and wingnuts hold the stack for travel. The 6 extra 1x3's are now extra uprights for when you shoot them apart

Not my video but here is the idea: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmDHNJGVsFw

Targets: a ream of paper is less than $2. Print basic bulls eye on quick print. 500 targets for the price of a black ink cartridge.
Link Posted: 4/19/2018 11:28:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/19/2018 11:34:07 PM EST by lowammo]
Tons of great ideas here!
Link Posted: 4/19/2018 11:32:39 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Makarov:
Use wooden dowel rods like these;
http://store.cincinnatidowel.com/images/products/620.jpg
and cheap pencil sharpener;
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NjAwWDgwMA==/z/qdUAAOxyuR5Taf8v/$_32.JPG?set_id=880000500F

to make cheap, disposable, non-marring punches for tight fitting pieces that need a little coaxing. cut to length with a utility knife or handsaw, sharpen and then trim the sharpened end to exactly the diameter you need with a razor knife. Remove magazine floorplates, remove tight takedown pins on an AR, trigger pins on a shotgun, etc. You can also whittle the end into a wedge shape for prying parts without risk of damage to the part or the finish. The wood dowel will likely break long before you apply enough force to damage anything on the gun. A sharp point also makes a good pick to clean nooks and crannies, move springs around or apply a single drop of oil or any other liquid. Again, all without fear of damaging anything on the gun.
View Quote
You can also use the same technique to make smores skewers., a narrow diameter dowel sharpened in the pencil sharpener and presto! Impale your marshmallows and hold 'em over the fire.
Link Posted: 4/19/2018 11:45:34 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By lawright1988:
If you have a stack of old Berretta M9 Mags laying around from your military days and can't find a use for them and you happen to own an M&P 9mm, 9mmC,CZ75 Variant,Sig P226, Sig P228 and maybe a few others then you can re-locate the mag catch hole (i.e. cut a new one) to the proper place for your pistol. You can do this by disassembling your current mag and the M9 mag the placing them side by side with teh feed lips placed against a hard perpendicular surface and marking out the new location and dimensions with a sharpie or pencil then using a Dremel and a cutoff wheel to cut the new hole.

A few notes on this. The slide does not lock back on the last round with my M&P 9mm and the beretta mag sticks out slightly more than the factory mag and you lose 2 rounds of capacity but 500 rounds later my modified mags have not had a hiccup. They work great in their intended role as range mags and I didn't pay $30+ for them and I have a virtually unlimited supply
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I remember doing that to UZI mags back in the day... I needed mags for my Colt 9mm carbine.
Link Posted: 6/10/2018 7:24:41 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RoyDamnMercer:
Mock me now, thank me later...

I know it's a little silly, a lot un-tacti-cool, and slightly gay (and not in a good way, like that brave woman Caitlyn Jenner)

This is an idea I came up with because I have too many rifles with too many different scope set-ups to keep track of...I know, white people problems, right?

This is not for your Tier 1 HSLD operators or your low level Fudd with a 30-06 with a bead sight. It's for guys like me. Maybe you're like me? I dunno, so here it is...

Every scope is a different height above bore, and I zero different rifles at different ranges and I can't keep track of them. I know there are apps on my phone that do that stuff but I don't want to rely on tech or anything that can crash...so this is what I came up with to give me the basics for a particular rifle. I have the rifle's scope height above center bore, and then bullet drop for various distances. That's it, keep it simple.

10 pack of luggage tags off eBay for $4.99

roy d...dope with a scope
View Quote
Great idea! Best so far.
Link Posted: 6/11/2018 6:55:00 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RoyDamnMercer:
Mock me now, thank me later...

I know it's a little silly, a lot un-tacti-cool, and slightly gay (and not in a good way, like that brave woman Caitlyn Jenner)

This is an idea I came up with because I have too many rifles with too many different scope set-ups to keep track of...I know, white people problems, right?

This is not for your Tier 1 HSLD operators or your low level Fudd with a 30-06 with a bead sight. It's for guys like me. Maybe you're like me? I dunno, so here it is...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v476/roydamnmercer/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_0803_zpswbf8badm.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v476/roydamnmercer/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_0804_zpsfodnapyh.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v476/roydamnmercer/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_0805_zpsheb2axgn.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v476/roydamnmercer/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_0806_zpsqfesl4hp.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v476/roydamnmercer/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_0807_zpsg1grzkv8.jpg

Every scope is a different height above bore, and I zero different rifles at different ranges and I can't keep track of them. I know there are apps on my phone that do that stuff but I don't want to rely on tech or anything that can crash...so this is what I came up with to give me the basics for a particular rifle. I have the rifle's scope height above center bore, and then bullet drop for various distances. That's it, keep it simple.

10 pack of luggage tags off eBay for $4.99

roy d...dope with a scope
View Quote
Holy crap.  Are your rifles named Billy D and Fred?
Link Posted: 7/17/2018 3:12:27 PM EST
Link to a thread I started in the Pistol Caliber and Rimfire Section of the AR-15 Forum.  Thread topic is a DIY Free Storage/transport tube for a standard Atchisson pattern AR-15 .22 conversion unit.

https://www.ar15.com/forums/AR-15/DIY-Free-Storage-Transport-Tube-For-22-Conversion/15-729553/
Link Posted: 10/21/2018 2:38:58 PM EST
On side charging uppers that have the screw in plug for the gas key trench in the back (like Bear Creek) - put a rubber o-ring on the plug and you won't have it loose and floppy or over tightened to keep it from rattling around.
Link Posted: 10/6/2020 11:27:14 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2020 11:28:45 AM EST by MS556]
If you have a Caldwell Rock BR front shooting rest, you know its not very solid.  Better than cheaper rests, but not professional benchrest grade. Don't throw it out yet or spend hundreds more on a more "professional" rest.

The problem is with the ball bearings in the swivel base.  There is a very cheap and inexpensive fix - replace them with these, available through Amazon, for less than $10 total:

Kyota NTA-512 3/4" needle bearing cage assembly (one needed)
Kyota TRA-512 3/4" thrust washers to match ID and OD of the needle bearing cage (two needed)

These replace the sloppy ball bearings and cage in the Rock BR.

These make the "Rock" rock-solid rather than rocky-wobbly.

You can also replace the plastic center shaft key with a metal one, but I found it not necessary.

Link Posted: 11/2/2020 3:57:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/2/2020 3:58:24 PM EST by Deinosuchus]
Have a Beretta ARX? Hate the factory sights? Get a Steyr AUG. The ARX sights are perfect on the AUG.
The Beretta ARX100 is the perfect accessory for a Steyr AUG, and the Steyr AUG is the perfect accessory for the ARX100.
Or maybe you could just find the sights by themselves.
Link Posted: 2/24/2021 11:15:49 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dontgiveahoot:
The best muzzle cover? A condom with a rubber band to hold it on. Shoot-off, waterproof and dirt cheap.

Yeah, I learned it from a , but she was frickin' hot in that movie!

For a heck of a lot of cheap survival tricks has a lot of neat stuff on his website. Condoms, film canisters, 550 cord and pop cans can do anything.
View Quote



Finger cots
Link
About 20 cents each
No rubber band needed
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