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Posted: 5/11/2018 8:31:58 PM EDT
I’ve read you can mount a Pvs14 behind a zeroed red dot using a usgi pvs14 Mount then overlap the Ir laser to the dot and your zeroed enough to make hits. Can the same thing be done with an acog?

I’ve also read the acog is too bright and can etch the reticle in the pvs14 is this a concern or is a quick 1-2 minute zero ok?
Link Posted: 5/11/2018 9:21:31 PM EDT
Put the pinhole cover on the 14 and you should be fine for a short time. If you have the opportunity to zero the laser while shooting there are a few easy methods too.
Link Posted: 5/12/2018 12:09:16 AM EDT
I takes a rather bright light to burn an image if exposed for a short period. If anything it leaves a darker area that fades away in minutes.

Pinhole caps introduce POI shift though in this case it shouldn't affect the outcome much if at all. It's just some parallax shift that the ACOG should handle just fine, so in my mind no additional error should come out of this kind of a pinhole zeroing method.

Either way I'd say you're good to go.
Link Posted: 5/12/2018 1:59:59 AM EDT
As I understand it, a PVS14 is not collaminated and will produce POI shift if used behind magnified optics. That will probably be a bigger issue than the possibility of burning an image. Your best bet might be the telluric group target like these here: https://tnvc.com/shop/telluric-group-ir-laser-zero-targets/

Lock your gun into a sled and line up on the target using your day optic and a flashlight. Turn off the white light, go to your NVD and dial in your IR pointer until it makes the target glow on your chosen zero point. Switch between the two to confirm and you're good to go. Its going to be a pain, but this will get you there.
Link Posted: 5/12/2018 4:01:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/12/2018 5:35:49 AM EDT by murtis]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Soich:
As I understand it, a PVS14 is not collaminated and will produce POI shift if used behind magnified optics. That will probably be a bigger issue than the possibility of burning an image. Your best bet might be the telluric group target like these here: https://tnvc.com/shop/telluric-group-ir-laser-zero-targets/

Lock your gun into a sled and line up on the target using your day optic and a flashlight. Turn off the white light, go to your NVD and dial in your IR pointer until it makes the target glow on your chosen zero point. Switch between the two to confirm and you're good to go. Its going to be a pain, but this will get you there.
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True 14 is not collimated / boresighted and in addition the use of a pinhole cover (with one hole) will shift the image even more. But ony matters if you used it in front of a day optic like a clip on, or in some other way where the 14 is the first piece of the optic train.

When behind a collimated optic like an ACOG the POI shift of the 14 wont matter much, if at all. The better the optic (ACOG in this case) is in handling parallax shift the less a 14 behind matters. Your eye will move much more behind the ACOG than what a 14 will introduces in parallax shift, or off axis rotation. Neither should matter as the ACOG is roughly collimated and reticle projected at a good distance.

Just as looking through a clip on with your eye the image moves with your head movements as the clip on is collimated. If your eye stays roughly on the center line, and with better clip on's you can go way off axis, there is no POI shift. Or a day optic for that matter, it doesn't matter that much where your eye is. Same thing with 14 behind an optic that's collimated good enough, the slight movement / shift wont matter.

Edit: didn't read your reply keeping in mind the original point of zeroing the laser (was only thinking of the POI shift), but your suggested method is great and will definitely lead to better results even if a 14 behind the ACOG was perfectly collimated & no pinhole cover. Obviously as you said needs more preparation, plus takes time, but the result will actually be good rather than somewhere out there close enough to hit something.
Link Posted: 5/16/2018 9:01:30 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/16/2018 9:02:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/16/2018 9:03:01 AM EDT by TNVC_Augee]
Link Posted: 5/16/2018 9:23:17 AM EDT
I've done it to get on paper. Now I just shoot close and get on paper. 15 yards or so.
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