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Posted: 4/2/2020 3:45:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2020 3:48:08 AM EDT by TNVC_Augee]
Link Posted: 4/2/2020 7:57:04 AM EDT
Explains alot. Thanks for the write up.
Link Posted: 4/2/2020 9:56:42 AM EDT
Binocular NV is the way to go.
Even the very best description cannot catch the amazing truth of the advantage that can the proven only when you have the binoculars on and have them adjusted just exactly right.
There is a "sweet spot" in the adjustment that suddenly crystallizes in your vision -= and when you hit it you khow cool and effective binocular vision really is.
If you can afford it....buy it now, while money retains its value, is my advice.


Here is a poor man's way to cheat just a little depth perception out of your single tube set while you await delivery of the binocular set.

It's an old article, and I don't know whether the pictures will still show up. If not, the word pictures will have to suffice.
I used a red laser for the reason that it was cheap, and I could take pictures to post that showed the laser lines to make the point.
https://www.ar15.com/forums/armory/Cheap_laser_line_generators_for_NV_depth_perception_and_hazard_detection/18-417389/?

It is a cheat. Nowhere near as good as the real thing. If you fail to buy the real thing - a genuine dual tube binocular - while you still can cobble together the deal, don't come crying to me.
Link Posted: 4/2/2020 2:06:54 PM EDT
Great post. This should help out a lot of folks.

I don't know how close it is to being correct but this has worked for me for a quick and dirty DIY collimation. Obviously, it's ideal to have it done professionally.

After dropping the tubes in with the eyepieces not fully tightened down, I put the bino on (powered on), and slowly rotate the eyepieces until I get the best image. I find a star works the best because if it's "off" I'll see double and when it's close to spot on I'll see just one star. I know I'm good when my eyes/brain go "ahhh, that's better". Then I tighten it up.

Link Posted: 4/2/2020 2:34:38 PM EDT
Augee you're awesome thanks for the science posts.

Cj7hawk aka "David" around here wrote up a tutorial on how to collimate a pair of night vision goggles with some items a typical arfcommer "should have laying around" and it's very helpful.
Link Posted: 4/2/2020 3:57:49 PM EDT
Thanks a ton!  This helps greatly.
Link Posted: 4/2/2020 5:26:02 PM EDT
Oh damn, I didnt realize the differences between built to spec BNVGs and dual monoculars!
Could someone have 2 monoculars collimated to have them synced up?
Link Posted: 4/2/2020 5:59:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 2JokersWild:
Oh damn, I didnt realize the differences between built to spec BNVGs and dual monoculars!
Could someone have 2 monoculars collimated to have them synced up?
View Quote


Absolutely, but the effectiveness would depend on the security of the bridge mount system and whether they would always lock up together in the same place. Similar issue with flippy goggles like DTNVGs - can collimate then for one IP setting (width) but as soon as your eyes don’t match that same measurement they’ll be a bit off. Not sure how most guys set their collimation for those type of units when they go out the door, but I imagine there’s a set average width they stick to that most end users are near. A fixed bridge like an RNVG let’s you keep a given collimation for any width as long as the pods ride fairly rigidly and parallel-ley along the bridge track.
Link Posted: 4/2/2020 7:24:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 2JokersWild:
Oh damn, I didnt realize the differences between built to spec BNVGs and dual monoculars!
Could someone have 2 monoculars collimated to have them synced up?
View Quote


@2JokersWild
From my experience it's no big deal whatsoever. I suppose if you had a -14 that was seriously off it could be a problem but I've ran about 8 different PVS-14's as duals on a "fixed" bridge (NVD S-mount), D-14, and NPBM and never had any issues.

Is there a difference, yes, but IMHO it's not an OMG difference. Same goes for articulating goggles versus fixed.

I know people have had their monoculars collimated as duals but I don't think I've ever heard from someone if it made any difference. Maybe someone will chime in who's done it.
Link Posted: 4/3/2020 9:46:08 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jwramp:
Absolutely, but the effectiveness would depend on the security of the bridge mount system and whether they would always lock up together in the same place. Similar issue with flippy goggles like DTNVGs - can collimate then for one IP setting (width) but as soon as your eyes don’t match that same measurement they’ll be a bit off. Not sure how most guys set their collimation for those type of units when they go out the door, but I imagine there’s a set average width they stick to that most end users are near. A fixed bridge like an RNVG let’s you keep a given collimation for any width as long as the pods ride fairly rigidly and parallel-ley along the bridge track.
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I guess articulating goggles with IPD stops would help in that regard.
Link Posted: 4/3/2020 10:07:21 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By -HOOT-:
I guess articulating goggles with IPD stops would help in that regard.
View Quote


For consistency sake and if they were collimated at the IPD stop setting that you’re using, probably. I think it’s tough to say how “big of a deal” any of that is though. You have guys that collimate by hand, some that don’t at all, and others that say the difference in image shift tolerance between the tubes with pigtails and the ones without is enough to make collimation near impossible. I imagine there was testing done on the .mil side to come up with the specific requirements for collimation and how close you need to get, but we’ll likely not get to see that. Having looked through the test set while my binos were getting collimated because I was curious, it’s a very simple process and it does indeed make for a more natural and less eye/brain-straining experience when it’s done right. I have no clue whether the variation in angle from switching flippy-goggles between different users is enough to put them “out of spec”, just something I thought might be worth bringing up if we’re gonna poke around in the weeds. Hopefully a non-issue for most. I don’t want dealers to have to make guys send in their IPD when they order goggles
Link Posted: 4/3/2020 12:42:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/3/2020 12:49:16 PM EDT by will-1]
I'll clarify that I was mainly referring to new PVS-14s on a bridge versus a collimated bino. The ones I used were all bought new so the eyepieces were set correctly and they worked very good together without being collimated like a bino. If the eyepieces are off from each other (such as a DIY) then you can have some major issues with it being unusable. Same for a non-collimated bino. You can't change the position of the image tube inside the housing, so you're really not collimating the tube, you're adjusting the eyepieces.

I do mine by hand because I've switched tubes around and still do so it doesn't make sense to send them in each time. If I wasn't, I'd send them in to be done properly. From recollection, the goggles look about the same before I swapped them, although I do think the GP tubes that originally came in the Anvis-9 looked the best when I first got it and they were still collimated before I swapped them out.

The BNVD-SG I had I bought new and I never messed with it. It was always a great image. IMO the articulation by itself doesn't make a noticeable difference in changing collimation. If it did, you'd be seeing outlines around things or double. You'd definitely know. We've all had (bino owners) one eyepiece that was slightly off (ETA: as in not focused right) and you know right away.  

Link Posted: 4/3/2020 9:39:04 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/16/2020 8:47:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/16/2020 8:47:55 PM EDT by TooBigToFail]
So, what if you don't have binocular vision?  My vision is so bad in one eye, I really only use the other.  No depth perception.  It's my world, I've lived in it for a long time, and I'm not bumping into things or unable to catch baseballs.  My brain just figured it out the best it could, I guess.

I've been looking at some NV.  If I were to get a PVS-7, and only used one eye through it, would the prisms and other mechanisms screw up the image?  Would I be bumping into things or would it be just like the world I see with my one good eye?

I think with PVS14's monoculars it would be easy, I just put it in front of my good eye.  The whole world will just be green as my dominant eye would be the only one 'viewing' anything.
Link Posted: 4/16/2020 10:03:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/20/2020 9:26:08 PM EDT
Outstanding, TVNC once again being a fantastic contributor and resource for the community.

Can we do a little bit of related "question time"?  

1) I understand the basic gist of collimation, but how is it actually accomplished on a binocular device?  What is physically adjusted to "line up" the image?  Is that something that can be done somewhat safely by a non-expert end user?
1a) The last couple times I wore my binos, something felt slightly 'off', got that ever so slightly disjointed, dizzy feeling.  Like cold medicine side effects.  I haven't fully explored why that might be, but is it possible the collimation got messed up?  

2) Is there a good 'procedure' for setting IPD, or do you really just have to feel it out?  I tried using calipers to set the centerline of the tubes to my IPD as measured by the optometrist (and more or less confirmed by calipers and a mirror) but that didn't seem to work super well.  From there I just kept adjusting until it seemed like the image was as perfectly round as I could get it (not being cut off by the edge of the lense meaning I'm looking through straight), but I wonder if there's a methodical way to get there that you folks with experience know that I haven't figured out yet.

Apologies if these are already answered in the second wall of text, my monkey brain hasn't finished that one ye... SQUIRREL!
Link Posted: 4/21/2020 2:51:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/14/2020 5:09:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/14/2020 5:14:18 PM EDT by tlandoe07]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jwramp:


Absolutely, but the effect­iveness would depend on the security of the b­ridge mount system and whether they would alw­ays lock up together in the same place. Similar issue with flippy goggles like DTNVG­s - can collimate then for one IP setting (width­) but as soon as your eyes don’t match that s­ame measurement they’ll be a bit off. Not sure how most guys set their collimation­ for those type of units when they go out the­ door, but I imagine there’s a set average wi­dth they stick to that most end users are nea­r. A fixed bridge like an RNVG let’s you keep a­ given collimation for any width as long as t­he pods ride fairly rigidly and parallel-ley along the bridge track.
View Quote


If using a TS-3895 or a NV-2500, the IP distance is fixed, so you actually can't collimate it at a user's IP distance. I'm not sure about the ANV-126.

If you're using tubes that were designed to be used in a Bino, and you have matching glass (same Part#, same MFR), in most cases you'll actually be close to collimated with only minor adjustments needed. Most fixed bridge systems with correctly matched tubes will usually pass a collimation field test on the first go. The issue with bridged PVS-14s is the amount of play and flexion that the bridge allows, since a half degree will throw collimation off by a significant margin.
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