Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 8/13/2019 5:20:45 PM EDT
I have a pair of ANVIS 9s and there is a little wobble in one of the tubes where it connects to that bar mount on top. Is there a way to fix that or tighten things up? How do I take the tubes off that bar on top?
New to these obviously haha.
Thanks guys!

Also, anyone have any suggestions for getting them uparmored and upgraded?
Thanks
Link Posted: 8/14/2019 2:39:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/14/2019 4:50:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2019 4:51:23 AM EDT by SGT-Fish]
seeing all the breakage of military ANVIS goggles really makes me like the idea of the RNVG. I may be pricing out a housing next year.

You are right that the monocular to PAS interface is a weakpoint. But so is the whole PAS (as you also mentioned). I have seen them cracked clean in half. And we replace a lot of PAS just for excessive play. They must have been going for 100% lightweight when designing them. Now the Army doesn't even want us replacing the PAS or monoculars and just build them up on whole new housings("binoculars") as its not worth the time and effort for less than stellar results
Link Posted: 8/14/2019 6:52:45 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TNVC_Augee:
The ANVIS system isn’t necessarily designed to be the most solid system—without looking at your actual unit, you may simply have a worn out axle or monocular pod, somewhat hard to tell. A rebuild might fix it, it might not.

As I’ve mentioned elsewhere, the ANVIS is one of my favorite goggles, however, I would say that most of the “up-armor” and “upgrades” out there aren’t really worth the squeeze, IMHO. Even the most popular “up-armor” option is a full rebuild that does nothing more than epoxy some metal to the PAS (Pivot and Adjustment Shelf), but doesn’t address the relatively delicate monocular pod attachment interfaces and the very finely threaded and thin adjustment axle—in essence, you’re addressing one weak point, but leaving all the others, and increasing the chances of damaging those—the only real “upgrade” that might be worth it to some is the “old school” method of simply filling the whole PAS with epoxy, but you will lose both tilt and IPD adjustment in the process to gain a more solid PAS bridge.

If you really want to upgrade, my recommendation would be to bite the bullet and upgrade the whole housing to something like the RNVG.

~Augee
View Quote
Do they make an RNVG that takes ANVIS glass? Or would he need an ANVIS Mod3 or do they even still make Sentinel housing kits?
Link Posted: 8/14/2019 10:54:22 AM EDT
Thank you all for the responses.

I think I am just being too OCD haha. There is just a slight amount of play in the left tube and it bugs me. Sounds like trying to make these the way I would want is not worth it.
I think I will probably just sell them and buy some brand new goggles from TNVC .
Link Posted: 8/14/2019 7:40:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2019 11:56:07 PM EDT by TNVC_Augee]
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 4:56:32 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TNVC_Augee:

@SGT-Fish

The RNVG is not currently made in an ANVIS objective compatible version, though the MOD-3B and DTNVG are both available, albeit special order for us. The AVS Sentinel is technically still "available" in a general sense... but I would not hold my breath on getting a new one in the near future.

That being said, generally speaking, when upgrading from ANVIS to a ground goggle, I generally recommend switching the PVS-14 objectives at the same time, while ANVIS glass is very, very nice, the PVS-14 objective is much simpler and much more rugged, and once the lenses start getting dirty (whether you're using LIFs, sacrificial lenses, or nothing, glass on the ground gets dirty in ways that they don't in aircraft), it's somewhat more moot.

Meanwhile, almost all ANVIS glass, unless it's 5050 glass will have various coatings that cut out certain wavelengths of light, which is nice if you need it, but can cause its own whole set of issues that you need to be aware of.

~Augee
View Quote
@TNVC_Augee
Do you find less demand for Anvis glass, ball plunger, etc? That was the big draw for me to the Sentinel (mainly ball plunger but Anvis glass is niiiice). I would think there’d be enough demand to start making RNVGs with these options available but maybe I’m way off. Hence the question.

Since we’re on the Anvis topic, do Anvis lenses work the same as a LIF with green lasers or will those still damage the tube? It doesn’t matter for me but curious for the info. I was iffy at first about the slight loss of performance but its proven to be worth it for me. I like the Anvis glass better and I’m virtually guaranteed a great focus/image every time I use them.
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 6:08:40 AM EDT
yes, an anvis objective will accept a LIF just fine. I was actually playing with a LIF, and a green laser I forgot I had, last night. The laser was blocked entirely at a 90degree angle, but if the laser was at a <45degree angle to the LIF, then it would let some light through. The smaller the angle, the more light it let through. I found this very interesting and kinda worrisome as to their effectiveness. Though in a standard housing it would keep lasers from directly striking the tube

and yes this was a brand new military bought LIF
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 6:12:06 AM EDT
And yes Augee, I work mostly on Aviation goggles, but we have been picking up a lot of PVS-14 inspections and repairs lately just because my guys are overqualified for it.

mostly 6 month inspections on the ANVIS 6's, but we find a lot of broken parts during those and I'm getting ready to get good pictures of dissected intensifier tubes this week
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 6:26:19 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SGT-Fish:
yes, an anvis objective will accept a LIF just fine. I was actually playing with a LIF, and a green laser I forgot I had, last night. The laser was blocked entirely at a 90degree angle, but if the laser was at a <45degree angle to the LIF, then it would let some light through. The smaller the angle, the more light it let through. I found this very interesting and kinda worrisome as to their effectiveness. Though in a standard housing it would keep lasers from directly striking the tube

and yes this was a brand new military bought LIF
View Quote
I was wondering if the filters on the Anvis lenses work the same as a LIF or if you still need to add it if you wanted that same protection. I was surprised how much it cut down my D2s green laser.
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 11:05:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2019 11:06:11 AM EDT by great308]
Double post.
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 11:05:43 AM EDT
Minus blue filtering on anvis will cut down certain wavelengths but they were never designed for lasers and not to be trusted for that stuff. They were originally designed to cut out cockpit lighting to help with bloom and glare inside cockpits and other aviation needs.

If the wobble bothers you that much you can try the rubber band trick and wrap a rubber band around both tubes on eyepiece side and objective side to help with wobble. This may speed up damage but unlikely, depending on movement in each pod it could slightly move them off being perfectly collimated.
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 12:25:00 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By great308:
Minus blue filtering on anvis will cut down certain wavelengths but they were never designed for lasers and not to be trusted for that stuff. They were originally designed to cut out cockpit lighting to help with bloom and glare inside cockpits and other aviation needs.

If the wobble bothers you that much you can try the rubber band trick and wrap a rubber band around both tubes on eyepiece side and objective side to help with wobble. This may speed up damage but unlikely, depending on movement in each pod it could slightly move them off being perfectly collimated.
View Quote
Thanks. That’s what I figured but thought I’d ask. Good tip on the wobble 🤙
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 1:40:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 3:01:00 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By UNV:
A couple months ago we requested some ANVIS format RNVG housings from AB. Those housings should be ready in a month or so for around the same price as the rest of the RNVG housings.
View Quote
@UNV
That’s badass. Glass only no ball detent I assume?
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 3:13:15 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 3:45:41 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By UNV:
Correct, with dovetail, CR123 battery and aux port.
View Quote
Nice.
Link Posted: 8/15/2019 10:12:54 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By great308:
Minus blue filtering on anvis will cut down certain wavelengths but they were never designed for lasers and not to be trusted for that stuff. They were originally designed to cut out cockpit lighting to help with bloom and glare inside cockpits and other aviation needs.

If the wobble bothers you that much you can try the rubber band trick and wrap a rubber band around both tubes on eyepiece side and objective side to help with wobble. This may speed up damage but unlikely, depending on movement in each pod it could slightly move them off being perfectly collimated.
View Quote
Thanks for the reminder and the tip about the rubber bands. I should have remembered the need to block out aircraft cockpit lighting(my main job is avionics/electrical with goggles being a temporary extra duty). We still have issues with some older instruments that leak excessive light

Fly safe
Top Top