WEAPON LIBRARY
Assault Rifles  ( 55 )

Handguns  ( 15 )

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HK G3
Gewehr 3



Available Images
Images of the G3



Technical Data



Manufacturer
Heckler & Koch

Country Of Origin
Germany

Date Of Introduction
1950

Caliber
7.62 x 51 mm NATO

Feed System
Magazine

Rate Of Fire
600 rounds per minute

Weights
4.4 kg

Length
1,026 mm


More Information *


The G3 was the standard infantry weapon of the German Bundeswehr until 1997, and is still being used by several armed forces around the world. The G3 is typical of its day: a rifle chambered in 7.62 x 51 mm NATO, capable of semi-automatic or fully-automatic fire and using a detachable magazine, like the FN FAL or the M14. It is equipped with a flash suppressor and can mount a bayonet. It was developed by former Mauser engineers, after having spent some time in Spain working for the arms developers there. These people helped build the CETME rifle and took it back to Germany. Indeed, for a time the first G3s had "CETME" stamped on the side; the design had some modifications primarily to the bolt group and trigger pack. Early G3s, like the CETME, had wooden stock and handguard.

The G3 uses a firing mechanism that was developed from a roller-locking system patented by Edward Stecke of Poland during the 1930s; this was used in the MG-42. Near the end of the war Mauser was working on the StG.45(M), which did not make it past the prototype stage but used a development of the roller-locking system, known as a "Delayed Roller Locking" system. This roller-delayed blowback was further developed in Spain, which was looking for a new rifle. The CETME prototypes were complete by the early 1950s, and standardized on the then new NATO 7.62 mm round. This was adopted as the CETME by Spain in 1954, and with some differences, as the G3 by West Germany in 1959. The West German government bought a licence for manufacture of it and transferred it to HK, though they (HK), and former Mauser engineers had been integral to its development in Spain.


User Reviews And Comments

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1

swede1986   -  Sweden



G 3


Accurate and reliable. It's somewhat heavy but it's still well balanced.

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