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300 Blackout Master Thread
Recoil737  [Team Member]
Originally Posted By guitarmaniak:
Ok... so being the retard that I am I just accidentally bought some H110 pistol powder for my 300 blackout loads. I was so excited to finally get the last component of my reloading station that I saw h100 and grabbed it without checking the bottle. SO, my question is: is pistol powder the same as rifle??


The H110 from hodgdon is a pistol powder that is used in the 300BLK. As long as what you bought is from hodgdon and says H110 on it you are good to go.
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dryflash3  [Moderator]

Originally Posted By guitarmaniak:
Originally Posted By dryflash3:


Please don't clog up this thread with beginner reloading questions.

Start your own thread and ask. Thanks.


I thought it was stupid to ask that in this thread, but when I asked in my own thread I was told post it here. You might want to get all the moderators on the same page then, because every time I ask something related to 300 blackout reloading they tell me to post it on this thread.

Well in that case post 300 blk questions here, basic how to reload questions in their own thread.

Please read the Resources at the top of the page for basic reloading info.

In any case sorry for the run around. So many new people posting right now.

To answer your question, H-110 can be used in reloading 300 blk.

300 blk uses slow pistol powder (H-110) or fast burning rifle powder (Lil 'Gun, AA-1680 and others)

I like H-110 for up to 135 gr bullets and Lil 'Gun and AA-1680 for the heavier bullets. Talking supersonic loads here.
angus6  [Team Member]
Question time, since I dislike deburring will this work,

stage 2 deprime
stage 3 swage
stage 6 size and trim

chop them in cut-off

finish on a Gracey trimmer and thoughts on repowering the trimmer and skipping the cut-off saw
aviserated1  [Member]
Today I formed some more 300 Blackout (300Whisper) by expanding the necks of 221 Fireball cases. My Redding 300/221 Fireball came with two expander buttons(5mm to 7mm and 6mm to .308). While expanding the necks, I did notice the expander button was chattering. This told me I was not using enough lube inside necks. So I then switched to the Imperial Dry Neck lube and chattering went away. Case neck forming (expanding) is lots smoother using this stuff.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/319390/imperial-dry-neck-lube-1-oz-powder


...
dryflash3  [Moderator]

Originally Posted By angus6:
Question time, since I dislike deburring will this work,

stage 2 deprime
stage 3 swage
stage 6 size and trim

chop them in cut-off

finish on a Gracey trimmer and thoughts on repowering the trimmer and skipping the cut-off saw

Sorry, not following your post.

I found if I didn't debur before sizing/forming i got brass deposits in the neck of my sizing die.

Which caused the scratched necks.

Cleaned out die, and the scratches stopped.

I don't mind deburring now.
Captain_Howdy  [Member]
yea, if you are gonna form your own cases you just need to accept the fact there is gonna be a bit of work involved. I do it like so:


1: tumble brass

2: cut to initial length with chop saw

3: debur the freshly cut case

4: lube case and run through the sizing die

5: accomplish any primer pocket work that needs to be done: ream, clean, uniform...whatever it needs

6: final case trim...now it's time for the precision work

7: debur and chamfer the case mouth

8: back into the tumble for final cleaning, this removes lube and whatever else that got picked up in the processes

9: inspect and remove fod from the flash holes...now is when I do any kind of sorting that I may want to do as well

10: prime and load or store prepped cases for later.

this list is not all inclusive and does not indicate the amount of inspecting that I do as I complete the processes. but it goes to show that you do have work to do. I must admit that I do enjoy working with the 300 Black as I have found that it is a very rewarding round. Goos results seem to be very easy to obtain...at least from what I have done so far...with the exception of bullets in the middle of the load range...I have no real use for those any way.
dryflash3  [Moderator]

Originally Posted By Captain_Howdy:
yea, if you are gonna form your own cases you just need to accept the fact there is gonna be a bit of work involved. I do it like so:


1: tumble brass

2: cut to initial length with chop saw

3: debur the freshly cut case

4: lube case and run through the sizing die

5: accomplish any primer pocket work that needs to be done: ream, clean, uniform...whatever it needs

6: final case trim...now it's time for the precision work

7: debur and chamfer the case mouth

8: back into the tumble for final cleaning, this removes lube and whatever else that got picked up in the processes

9: inspect and remove fod from the flash holes...now is when I do any kind of sorting that I may want to do as well

10: prime and load or store prepped cases for later.

this list is not all inclusive and does not indicate the amount of inspecting that I do as I complete the processes. but it goes to show that you do have work to do. I must admit that I do enjoy working with the 300 Black as I have found that it is a very rewarding round. Goos results seem to be very easy to obtain...at least from what I have done so far...with the exception of bullets in the middle of the load range...I have no real use for those any way.

And now I know you work or worked in aviation.

Non aviators; fod = foreign object damage. As in keeping stuff from being sucked into jet engines.

If it gets sucked into an engine it's fod.
Keith_J  [Life Member]

Originally Posted By guitarmaniak:
Originally Posted By AnthonyL:
What about taking apart and cleaning he dies?


I will try that when I get home. Can I use generic lube for that? I have some at the house and Midway is out of the one you suggested.

Also, I just got in some Sierra 165gr bullets. Anyone have any load data for them? I can't seem to find any online...

The best bet for cleaning dies would be aggressive copper solvents meant for cleaning rifle bores. I've had this problem with a few dies, Pro Shot Copper Solvent IV seems to work great for me. Very clean dies and freshly trimmed brass are a bad combination, the brass likes to gall on the fresh surface and stick tightly.

After cleaning the dies, a quick coating of Naval Jelly, then another cleaning leaves behind a phosphated surface (Naval Jelly is phosphoric acid, don't leave it for any time on the die as it can dissolve steel). Rinse with hot water, then dry and oil to prevent rust. Brass doesn't gall on the die as easily.

Another issue is preserving oils like CLP are inadequate for sizing lubrication. Clean the dies before use and lightly coat with your case lube.
Keith_J  [Life Member]

Originally Posted By guitarmaniak:
Ok... so being the retard that I am I just accidentally bought some H110 pistol powder for my 300 blackout loads. I was so excited to finally get the last component of my reloading station that I saw h100 and grabbed it without checking the bottle. SO, my question is: is pistol powder the same as rifle??

H110 is magnum pistol powder that is also great in .30 Carbine, .22 Hornet and .410 shotgun. All the same.

Same with IMR/H 4227, Alliant 2400, Lil'Gun and AA 1680. I'm glad AA brought out 1680 since Winchester 680 is my favorite for Hornet and .30 Carbine. Should be great in the AAC Blackout.
angus6  [Team Member]
Originally Posted By dryflash3:

Originally Posted By angus6:
Question time, since I dislike deburring will this work,

stage 2 deprime
stage 3 swage
stage 6 size and trim

chop them in cut-off

finish on a Gracey trimmer and thoughts on repowering the trimmer and skipping the cut-off saw

Sorry, not following your post.

I found if I didn't debur before sizing/forming i got brass deposits in the neck of my sizing die.

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/300%20Blk/PB280297.jpg

Which caused the scratched necks.

Cleaned out die, and the scratches stopped.

I don't mind deburring now.


Guess I should have used station instead of stage that help ? Basically run them through the press, then cut the extra off with chop saw and use the Gracey to finish trim to size, chamfer and debur
AnthonyL  [Team Member]
Originally Posted By Captain_Howdy:
yea, if you are gonna form your own cases you just need to accept the fact there is gonna be a bit of work involved. I do it like so:


1: tumble brass

2: cut to initial length with chop saw

3: debur the freshly cut case

4: lube case and run through the sizing die

5: accomplish any primer pocket work that needs to be done: ream, clean, uniform...whatever it needs

6: final case trim...now it's time for the precision work

7: debur and chamfer the case mouth

8: back into the tumble for final cleaning, this removes lube and whatever else that got picked up in the processes

9: inspect and remove fod from the flash holes...now is when I do any kind of sorting that I may want to do as well

10: prime and load or store prepped cases for later.


After some experimenting I found myself following these exact steps with good success. Lots of work, but produces a really nice final result.
Captain_Howdy  [Member]
Originally Posted By AnthonyL:
Originally Posted By Captain_Howdy:
yea, if you are gonna form your own cases you just need to accept the fact there is gonna be a bit of work involved. I do it like so:


1: tumble brass

2: cut to initial length with chop saw

3: debur the freshly cut case

4: lube case and run through the sizing die

5: accomplish any primer pocket work that needs to be done: ream, clean, uniform...whatever it needs

6: final case trim...now it's time for the precision work

7: debur and chamfer the case mouth

8: back into the tumble for final cleaning, this removes lube and whatever else that got picked up in the processes

9: inspect and remove fod from the flash holes...now is when I do any kind of sorting that I may want to do as well

10: prime and load or store prepped cases for later.


After some experimenting I found myself following these exact steps with good success. Lots of work, but produces a really nice final result.


yep, it does seem like a tedious process but the results speak for themselves. I would rather spend a little more time and a bit of extra work than try to fix problems caused by taking shortcuts. Some might think I tumble it too much but I have noticed the little saw I use leaves quite a bit of brass dust behind inside the cases. So it just seams the best way to get it out is to tumble it. And any time I use case lube I will always tumble it off before I load the case. It's just more crap to gum up the chamber of your gun down the road, and I like to remove any kind of excess handling debris.

Dryflash commented on my use of FOD. FOD can and is often used in various different ways, but basically it is a noun or verb type thing. You have your foriegn object debris, which is anything that basically does not belong and can cause damage if not removed and you have your foriegn object damage, which is a dynamic action of debris that causes damage. It doesn't matter if it is damage caused by an engine ingesting debris or maybe debris jamming up a flight control, the result is always catastrophic and it is attributed to FOD either way. But yea, I have been working in aviation for years on all sorts of aircraft...now I am a helicopter guy. I hate FOD, I dont want it in any of my stuff!

Gearhead1940  [Member]
http://www.lehighdefense.com/index.php/shop/it-bullets-2/maximum-expansion-subsonic/74/.308-maximum-expansion,-200-gr,-subsonic-bullet-detail

Has anybody used the 200gr bullets from LeHigh Defense? Been looking for some load data and haven't found anything - If nobody here has, I'll call and post it here for future reference.

Edit- Just called and phone was routed to a guy on the SHOT show floor at the LHD booth. He said he will send me info next week!
dryflash3  [Moderator]

Originally Posted By angus6:
Originally Posted By dryflash3:

Originally Posted By angus6:
Question time, since I dislike deburring will this work,

stage 2 deprime
stage 3 swage
stage 6 size and trim

chop them in cut-off

finish on a Gracey trimmer and thoughts on repowering the trimmer and skipping the cut-off saw

Sorry, not following your post.

I found if I didn't debur before sizing/forming i got brass deposits in the neck of my sizing die.

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/300%20Blk/PB280297.jpg

Which caused the scratched necks.

Cleaned out die, and the scratches stopped.

I don't mind deburring now.


Guess I should have used station instead of stage that help ? Basically run them through the press, then cut the extra off with chop saw and use the Gracey to finish trim to size, chamfer and debur

Stations on a 1050, ok following now.

First trim with Dillon trimmer? Then your plan should work fine.
Shizzlemah  [Team Member]
H110 is fine, and is quite recommended for supersonic loads.

The label reads pistol powder, but that's like the label on Twinkies saying they make a nice snack. They make a good meal too, and H110 will run fine in a 300BLK
Medic08  [Member]
Anyone try any 190gr SMK with lil gun for subs? I have a bunch of both laying around and wanted to put it to good use.
MRBLACK947  [Member]
Pardon me if this does not apply to this thread.

Does anyone have a list of usable supersonic bullets for 300 BLK?

I am new to this cartridge, and it would be nice to have a list of part numbers so when I go to the local sportsmans warehouse or Cabellas I know I am not buying just any old 308 bullet that wont work properly.

So far I have found the Sierra Matchking 2121 seems like a useable bullet.
nikdfish  [Member]
Three that come to mind are Hornady V-Max 110, Nosler 125 BT (ballistic tip) and Sierra #2120 (125 grain spire point). You can also look at the load data on the Hodgdon web site which lists the bullet ID in the first column of the load data chart (metallic cartridge/rifle/300 AAC Blackout).

Nick
MRBLACK947  [Member]
Originally Posted By nikdfish:
Three that come to mind are Hornady V-Max 110, Nosler 125 BT (ballistic tip) and Sierra #2120 (125 grain spire point). You can also look at the load data on the Hodgdon web site which lists the bullet ID in the first column of the load data chart (metallic cartridge/rifle/300 AAC Blackout).

Nick


Thanks Nick. Exactly the kind of info I have been needing. That gives me 4 to look for.
Vegitan  [Team Member]
Has anyone tried making 300 BLK out of 5.56 blanks?

I am assuming that brass is made the same way but just has a crimped neck.
wpeschel  [Team Member]
Originally Posted By Vegitan:
Has anyone tried making 300 BLK out of 5.56 blanks?

I am assuming that brass is made the same way but just has a crimped neck.


You should try reading the first three pages.
John87  [Team Member]
Originally Posted By Vegitan:
Has anyone tried making 300 BLK out of 5.56 blanks?

I am assuming that brass is made the same way but just has a crimped neck.


check out this thread
http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_6_42/362105_Can_5_56_M200_blanks_be_reloaded_as_live_ammo__Update__on_3rd_firing__56k_do_not_click_.html

This is for reloading .223 from .223 blanks, however it goes into the specifics of the brass. The OP concluded that the blanks were fit-for-duty, so I see no reason why you cannot use them for 300AAC
nikdfish  [Member]
An alternative cutting option when forming modest amounts of 300BLK brass from 5.56/.223 is to use a tubing cutter. Although not as fast as a chop saw with a jig, it makes less mess (no chips), and doesn't take up much space. The example here is a spring loaded mini tubing cutter of the sort you could use for steel hydraulic tubing or copper refrigerant lines.



Line up the blade wheel just below the shoulder of the donor case.



Rotate & tighten till the cut is complete. Alternatively, you can use a 1/2" variable speed drill to turn the case while holding the cutter stationary. That's my preferred method. (A 1/2" chuck will also accommodate the Lee trimmer cutter).



It is easy to be consistant, even without a jig, you just eyeball for the desired offset from the shoulder edge




Nick









Captain_Howdy  [Member]
Originally Posted By nikdfish:
An alternative cutting option when forming modest amounts of 300BLK brass from 5.56/.223 is to use a tubing cutter. Although not as fast as a chop saw with a jig, it makes less mess (no chips), and doesn't take up much space. The example here is a spring loaded mini tubing cutter of the sort you could use for steel hydraulic tubing or copper refrigerant lines.

http://www.skhowell.com/images/cutter-logo.jpg

Line up the blade wheel just below the shoulder of the donor case.

http://www.skhowell.com/images/cutter-alignment.jpg

Rotate & tighten till the cut is complete. Alternatively, you can use a 1/2" variable speed drill to turn the case while holding the cutter stationary. That's my preferred method. (A 1/2" chuck will also accommodate the Lee trimmer cutter).

http://www.skhowell.com/images/cutter-on-drill.jpg

It is easy to be consistant, even without a jig, you just eyeball for the desired offset from the shoulder edge

http://www.skhowell.com/images/consistant-size.jpg


Nick











I tried that method in the beginning, my results were not the same as yours

BC98  [Member]
Originally Posted By MRBLACK947:
Pardon me if this does not apply to this thread.

Does anyone have a list of usable supersonic bullets for 300 BLK?
.


Don't have part numbers but I've used Speer 125gr TNT, Federal 125gr LOTM, Federal 130gr SOST, Speer 130gr Varmint HP, 147gr M80 pulled FMJ, Hornady 150gr FMJ, Speer 168gr HPBT, and Sierra 175gr MatchKings for supersonic loads.

Some worked better than others but all shot pretty well.
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