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Check Your Beretta 92FS (lots of pictures Dial-Up Death)
a308garand  [Team Member]
With all the internet drama put to the side, the Beretta 92F series pistol is a strong and reliable gun. As with all things made by man, there is a possibility of broken parts that can cause your pistol to go down for service. These are also things to look at if you are thinking of buying a used 92FS pistol, as well as minor upkeep to prevent problems.

The items pictured can take a bit of work to get the pistol apart, so break out your reading materiel if you don't know how to get the pistol disassembled

So with the knowledge that these are pistols that were shot a bunch, and then mostly continued to shoot some more......

On with the carnage!

Locking Block:
The locking block is exposed to a degree of force every time you fire the pistol. The left side "wing" of the locking block is usually the first area of concern, but I have seen both "wings" snap off and stop pistols from working.



Always inspect your locking block for signs of cracking during routine cleaning. See the red arrow:


If your locking block breaks, do not force the slide (hammering/banging) off of the pistol. First make sure you align the broken "wings" into the locked position on your slide. Use a dental pick or anything thin enough to support the broken part as you gently allow the slide to go forward off of the frame rails. The broken parts can then be replaced:


Slide Cracking:

You do not want this to be the result of poor maintenance and failing to spot cracks ahead of time. The 92FS has an improved hammer pin that will stop the rear of the slide from leaving the pistol at a high speed. It catches the broken slide. The old 92F does not have the improved hammer pin, and will allow a broken slide to hit you in the face.


Allow the slide to hand freely from your finger as pictured. Tap each side of the slide with a brass hammer (or even the metal guide rod from the pistol) and listen for a "tuning fork" ringing sound. If the tap produces a dull "thud" sound, you may have a cracked slide. If your slide is cracked, it needs to be replaced.


See red arrows for signs of cracked slides. These pistols still functioned, but will eventually break if not caught:



Barrel Cracks:

This is not very common, but if your pistol has been used a bunch and has broken several locking blocks, you need to keep and eye on this area. This pistol was still functioning, but suddenly started to shoot about 25 inches higher than normal.


Other Barrel Troubles:

The rear surface of your barrel impacts the breech face of your slide. As the pistol is fired, over a long time, you can weaken the recoil guide spring. The weak spring allows the pistol to beat itself to death, breaking parts and recoiling harder than normal. The rear face of the barrel can get a small ridge of metal in this area (red arrow). The top end is shiny from use and the bottom end still retains its finish. This ridge of metal can be easily removed by light stoning.


––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-
The above issues can be avoided by simple maintenance.
- Replace your guide rod spring every 3000-5000 rounds, or replace it if it is shorter than your guide rod.
- Keep the pistol lubed, it requires oil on the locking block and slide rails. The oil needs to be there, but does not have to drip off the pistol.

Hope you enjoyed the images


<Edited to Bold Title.....dpmmn>
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a308garand  [Team Member]
Added:

If your pistol is shot a buch and has started to have extraction troubles.......
It may be time to pull the extractor and clean it out. The residue from thousands of rounds gets trapped behind the extractor, preventing free movement. With the build up, the extractor can actually fail to grab rounds out of the chamber.

New extractor spring is cheap to replace the old one if you pulled it apart
dodgecoltracer  [Team Member]
Thank you!
fuzzy03cls  [Member]
Good info.
However I thought the locking block & slide cracking were old problems not seen any longer since Beretta revised those parts?
a308garand  [Team Member]
Originally Posted By fuzzy03cls:
Good info.
However I thought the locking block & slide cracking were old problems not seen any longer since Beretta revised those parts?

It still happens, but the revised parts are very tough and less prone to breakage.
If you have the newest version locking block and take care to replace your recoil guide spring, it will last a long long time.
Anything will break if you run it hard enough. These parts are not from weekend only guns, they were seriously run down with little care. The Beretta kicks butt, but can be broken if you don't take care of it. These photo took a long time to aquire

foxherb53  [Team Member]
Damn good info, Thanks.
The_Watcher  [Member]
Sticky!
CA_TX-Cop  [Life Member]
Great Post!!!

I knew everything except for the tapping the slide and listening for the tuning fork sound, so I have now added that to my inspection process.

Gulbrandr2  [Team Member]
This should be tacked.
MACD  [Team Member]
Awesome pics, thanks!

+1 for tack
WilsonCQB1911  [Team Member]
Fantastic post! Thanks for the info.
M4A1bushmaster  [Member]
should be tacked
a308garand  [Team Member]
Thanks guys.

Remember this, the gun beats itself to death when the recoil spring get tired. It will keep shooting, but over time, something will break.
The shiny spots on the locking block, slide rails and barrel are all in need of good lube. Keep on top of the recoil spring wear and run it wet with oil.

It will work a long long time.
dpmmn  [Moderator]

Originally Posted By Gulbrandr2:
This should be tacked.

I agree
dpmmn  [Moderator]
In the future I will make a Resource page on the top of the forum so we dont get too many tacked threads

I just have to wait for a few things to slow down here, so please be patient.


elkoholic  [Member]
Originally Posted By a308garand:
Thanks guys.

Remember this, the gun beats itself to death when the recoil spring get tired. It will keep shooting, but over time, something will break.
The shiny spots on the locking block, slide rails and barrel are all in need of good lube. Keep on top of the recoil spring wear and run it wet with oil.

It will work a long long time.



So, are we talking 1000, 5000, 10,000 rounds?
a308garand  [Team Member]
Saw one pistol go a reported 80,000+ rounds. The slide had cracked about 3/4 of the way down from the top on both sides......it was still shooting ok. Swapped it out for a new pistol because it had already eaten a few locking blocks and had lots of wear to the frame areas near the locking block wings. I wonder how long it would have gone on running as is.....or how many rounds it would have fired if the recoil spring was changed out more frequently, just not due to breakage.


Testing by Beretta for the M9 pistol (per Beretta Website)

• The average reliability of all M9 pistols tested at Beretta U.S.A. is 17,500 rounds without a stoppage.

• During one test of twelve pistols fired at Beretta U.S.A. before Army supervision, Beretta-made M9 pistols shot 168,000 rounds without a single malfunction.

• Two-thirds of all M9 hand guns endurance tested at Beretta U.S.A. fired 5,000 rounds without a single mal function or, at most, with only one malfunction.

• The average durability of Beretta M9 slides is over 35,000 rounds, the point at which U.S. Army testing ceases.

• The average durability of M9 frames is over 30,000 rounds.

• The average durability of M9 locking blocks is 22,000 rounds.
forever4  [Member]
You see these pictures of broken pistols and you can get worried that your 92 may blow up in your face. Well, truth is, its not really very likely for Mr. Average Shooter. These pistols had a LOT of use and abuse, and very little care in many cases. The average shooter is highly unlikely to ever see most of these problems. Not many of use shoot 80,000 rounds of +P ammo in our pistols.

One thing that was brought up and is important is replacing the recoil spring. This is a key part and really can affect the life of the pistol (slide). Its an inexpensive part that is easy to change. Cost less than twenty bucks and will save your gun. Also, clean and inspect any firearm often. I read where people brag about how they never clean them. Foolish economy. Part of cleaning a firearm, or any piece of equipment, is that it causes us to focus on the parts, inspecting them for wear and tear. Its just good sense to go over that firearm often and well if you want it to last.
anothergene  [Team Member]
I question why I never hear of the similar Taurus 92 slides cracking or the P-38 locking blocks breaking ?
Why just the Beretta ?
Shame too as my 92FS likes black tip "MG only" ammo.
McGruff1533  [Member]
Great info! I'll be checking my 96 Compact Inox L over when I get a chance. The round count is less than 1K, but the added stress from the .40 S&W round will likely beat the components harder than 9mm will.
Shadow4Golf  [Team Member]
And should you find that you need replacement parts like a locking block or recoil spring, Beretta USA sells them as a kit
http://www.berettausa.com/products/92/96-locking-block-kit/

I've got a 1989 vintage 92F that gets thoroughly inspected after every range trip. It was like new when I bought it back in 2005 and I replaced the recoil spring this year, along with a bunch of magazine springs. As you can see, both needed replacing.

ishoot2live  [Team Member]
Great thread!

Thanks, OP.

gogetumnow  [Team Member]
Great pics and excellent info OP.

A question if I may.... Do you recommend a heavier than stock recoil spring if a D hammer spring is used?
a308garand  [Team Member]
Originally Posted By gogetumnow:
Great pics and excellent info OP.

A question if I may.... Do you recommend a heavier than stock recoil spring if a D hammer spring is used?


The "D" hammer spring does lighten up the hammer fall, and is the same as cutting 3 coils off of the standard hammer spring.
When running the "D" spring, there is not need to bump up the poundage of the guilde rod spring. Stock spring works well either way.

Casebrius  [Member]
Is it possible to upgrade to a 92FS hammer pin on a 92F so that one can mitigate chances of emergency dental work? What production years did these early 92F's have problems?
solohabano  [Member]
Originally Posted By Casebrius:
Is it possible to upgrade to a 92FS hammer pin on a 92F so that one can mitigate chances of emergency dental work? What production years did these early 92F's have problems?


I'm curious about this too.
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