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Link Posted: 1/11/2009 12:24:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/12/2009 2:40:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By toemag:
Where is the range? and how is the rifle rigged up?

Tony


That's the Adelaide University Regiment Rifle and Pistol Club 100m rifle. The rifle in question is a Stirling 14P - an Armscor (Flipino) made .22 that my dad has had since the 1970s, with some equally obscure 4x30 (I think) scope. All bought from back in the days where you got guns from your sports store and could register them with your local plod if you really wanted to!

Shooting RWS ammo, I managed to get all shots on IPSC Classic targets at 100m, while the old man (who can really make a rifle sing) nearly got all double alphas!
Link Posted: 2/3/2009 12:23:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2009 5:51:45 PM EDT by surplus-gunnut]
Let me present our local range in Copenhagen, which is run by the municipality and financed by the federations and the users.
30 lanes 300 meters with covered stands. 10 lanes with obsolete SIUS-ascor electronic scoring equipment
20 lanes 200 meters with covered stands . 10 lanes can be equipped (normally only 5 is) with electronic scoring.
A number of 100 meter ranges without any target stands and no cover for the shooters. Used for "terrain-shooting" a scandinavian speciality.
30 lanes 50 meters (electronic) for small bore, 40 lanes 25 meters for pistols and the local hunting club's shed / 100 meter range.
Originally built in the early seventies, but around 1998 a corner was cut off by a new railway line and golf clubs and the new "Ørestad" development is creeping in on us. Used by the police and the home guard for training.
Top picture is the google earth view and below is the 300 meter range as seen from the covered stands.
Soren
Edit: spelling, language
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/KSCrange.jpg
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/300range800x600.jpg
Link Posted: 2/5/2009 9:33:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/5/2009 11:57:13 AM EDT
Well since I do not yet own an AR it's mostly my surplus rifles and my Pardini .22 i shoot out there. Heres my very first rifle, a very early (1946) Otterup mauser rebuild in 6,5 x 55 based on a greek M30 made by FN. Nice stock though it has a rather worn bore.
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/greek800x600-1.jpg
The standard rifle in out club (we shoot historic rifles from 1880-1945) is of course the swedish mauser, accurate, classic, slender and bl... long. You can even get new barrels for them.
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/PC150959crop-resize.jpg
But my absolute favorite is my 1955 Garand which is by law neutered (made into a repeating rifle by venting the gas cylinder) but otherwise is in perfect condition. Okay, it has parts from every maker there was, even Breda and Beretta.
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/blanket1-800.jpg
I do shoot borrowed AR's and C8's in competition but have decided to get my own little black number,Even my doctor has told me to hold back on the oiled
walnut and get some plastic
Soren
Link Posted: 2/8/2009 11:57:07 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/9/2009 8:02:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By surplus-gunnut:
Well since I do not yet own an AR it's mostly my surplus rifles and my Pardini .22 i shoot out there. Heres my very first rifle, a very early (1946) Otterup mauser rebuild in 6,5 x 55 based on a greek M30 made by FN. Nice stock though it has a rather worn bore.
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/greek800x600-1.jpg
The standard rifle in out club (we shoot historic rifles from 1880-1945) is of course the swedish mauser, accurate, classic, slender and bl... long. You can even get new barrels for them.
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/PC150959crop-resize.jpg
But my absolute favorite is my 1955 Garand which is by law neutered (made into a repeating rifle by venting the gas cylinder) but otherwise is in perfect condition. Okay, it has parts from every maker there was, even Breda and Beretta.
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/blanket1-800.jpg
I do shoot borrowed AR's and C8's in competition but have decided to get my own little black number,Even my doctor has told me to hold back on the oiled
walnut and get some plastic
Soren


By neutered, do you mean the Garand is no longer semi-automatic?
Link Posted: 2/9/2009 12:00:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Lancair:
Originally Posted By surplus-gunnut:
Well since I do not yet own an AR it's mostly my surplus rifles and my Pardini .22 i shoot out there. Heres my very first rifle, a very early (1946) Otterup mauser rebuild in 6,5 x 55 based on a greek M30 made by FN. Nice stock though it has a rather worn bore.
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/greek800x600-1.jpg
The standard rifle in out club (we shoot historic rifles from 1880-1945) is of course the swedish mauser, accurate, classic, slender and bl... long. You can even get new barrels for them.
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/PC150959crop-resize.jpg
But my absolute favorite is my 1955 Garand which is by law neutered (made into a repeating rifle by venting the gas cylinder) but otherwise is in perfect condition. Okay, it has parts from every maker there was, even Breda and Beretta.
http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt97/vognarkivet/blanket1-800.jpg
I do shoot borrowed AR's and C8's in competition but have decided to get my own little black number,Even my doctor has told me to hold back on the oiled
walnut and get some plastic
Soren


By neutered, do you mean the Garand is no longer semi-automatic?

That is exactly what I'm saying. Two holes drilled in the gas cylinder is the required alteration. I have swapped the gas locking nut with one I have removed the poppet valve from. That means it vents over 90 % of the gas forward instead of pushing the aim sideways via the holes drilled in the side. A semiauto is considered a particularly dangerous firearm and are not allowed in competition shooting -sound familiar?
Soren
Link Posted: 9/29/2010 1:03:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/30/2010 11:43:59 AM EDT by jonh]
Link Posted: 10/1/2010 3:56:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/1/2010 4:07:57 PM EDT by DanTSX]
I have a question. Are these typical of how most ranges appear in Europe?

The German, Czech, and that one in Denmark are amazing. Very few places like that in the USA in my experience. Even the "high end" club around here, and coincidentally, oldest in the nation, looks like a sandpit compared to those places. I've never seen those types of target baffles around here either. It seems like a good idea, as many of our ranges are under pressure from local government because nearby residents complain of noise pollution and even bullet strikes. The baffles seem like cheap insurance to prevent any rounds from passing over the berm.

What are the costs involved in maintaining a range membership in your country? Is it annual, or per visit?

I think that the typical American shooter is misinformed about European gun control laws, but it seems that in many cases, you folks have some arguably better situations depending on the country. I would never trade my situation, but I do like to learn about yours.


Link Posted: 10/2/2010 12:35:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/2/2010 10:03:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By toemag:
Hiya Dan. Our ranges are built with so many rules and regulations regarding safety that it becomes a big project, and its not enough just to tick the boxes the building inspectors are very thorough and have the power to condemn your building in a heartbeat, then you still can't use it as a range as the local Authorities charged with issuing firearms licences needs to rubber stamp it to. I belong to several clubs one I pay €50 a year and the other cost €500 initial membership fee with a €100+ yearly fee, but that's the brand new one where I spend most of my range time.

Tony

Thank you Tony, that is very insightful. The costs of our nicer ranges are similar it seems, or at least in my congested state. More safety is never a bad thing, and a look at your methods might save some of our clubs and ranges some considerable money as they fight constant litigation for environmental concerns, noise, or claims of errant bullet impacts. The NRA helps out a lot, but they are not comprehensive in their coverage to protect our ranges and clubs. Of course, some of the less populated states, citizens can drive out to open land and just set up their own range, so the experience is highly regional.

I'd still like to hear the costs and processes from other nations. Very interesting to see and read.
Link Posted: 1/1/2011 7:01:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By jonh:
Philippsburg Ranges Germany.





Was that during the annual HK Trophy match?
Link Posted: 11/10/2011 11:03:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2012 5:30:47 PM EDT by TheGrandIllusion]
This is in Saint Petersburg, Russia





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