Previous Page
Page:  / 4
Author
Message
septic-tank13
think for yourself... question authority...
Offline
Posts: 3714
Feedback: 100% (48)
Posted: 10/31/2007 9:50:19 AM
[Last Edit: 5/8/2008 7:54:34 PM by septic-tank13]
there have been a lot of really great posts on this forum over the years and many were of DIY projects with instructions and pics. it would be hard to tack them all, even though in a technical forum they are most welcome and encouraged.

things like how to skim bed, adjust triggers, stock texture, paint, etc. will be the primary focus here. lots of other thing apply as well like ruck sack building, mechanical rest building, tweaks, mods, etc.

pics of the project, before, during, and after are very helpful with the instructions explaining what you've done will make a great thread.


********* ETA **********

i ran across this the other day and found it relative. there articles and aids listed here for many kinds of projects we come across.

brownells gun tech page contains some great information and sources for the gunsmith and DIYers alike.

specifically, brownells newsletter archive contains project rifles, to stock finishing, to bedding, metal refinishing, etc. lots of good information here...


*********** ETA ************

i just edited the thread topic a bit and added "tips and tricks" to the title. we all have quite a few little things here and there we've used to improve our shooting experience, so they may as well be included for everyone's benefit. please feel free to share yours.

-ST13 5-8-08

www.nra.org
septic-tank13
think for yourself... question authority...
Offline
Posts: 3715
Feedback: 100% (48)
Link To This Post
Posted: 10/31/2007 9:50:43 AM
[Last Edit: 10/31/2007 10:20:44 AM by septic-tank13]
i'll go first i guess...

i made some rolling cement shooting benches this spring. they have wheels and although i was confident they would work well, many here and in other forums were concerned about two issues chiefly. 1) movement - with the wheels chocked/locked there is no movement. 2) wheel damage - i chose wheels/casters with a heavy weight rating and although i don't remember what kind of polymer they were, they have yet to form a flat spot, smash down, or otherwise fail to function properly. IE, it actually worked out like i had planned (which is rare)...

first i made forms. i went with easy measurements as they quicker and easier to cut. 3" deck screws held it together and i used 3 mil plastic laid over a sheet of plywood to form a nice flat surface to lay the forms on.

my overall dimensions were basically 4' long and 3' wide. so, i my boards in 24" for the sides, 36" for the front, and 9" and 18" for the rear. due to the width of the actual 2x4's, you don't end up with a structure that is actual that size, but slightly smaller, but in cases like this, a few inches here and there won't hurt a bit.



after you have the plastic laid nice and tight with no creases or rolls, lay the form down and pour in your concrete. i was doing some work on my shop at the time, so i had left over concrete to use, but quickcrete and your own mixes will work just fine. pour in the concrete and have two or three pieces of reinforcement prepared. rebar is some of the cheapest and easiest to use. we need this for no other reason than to prevent cracking from the small portion of the "T" to the large portion. without reinforcement, you can plan on it breaking there eventually. after those were sunk into the concrete, i added three 1/2 carriage bolts there were 5" long. depending on your understructure, this is about the right height as it'll leave nearly two and half inches exposed to work with. the remainder can be cut off or left.





you can trowel the top off with a 2x4 and that will be smooth enough. we aren't too concerned with the bottom (the part currently facing up) as were are the top (part facing down) as we don't want to disturb the plastic or a crease will occur. although it didn't do it, stapling the plastic down to the plywood would help this quite a bit.

now we need to make a understructure. i had a basic design in mind with be gusset itself and use less metal, thus less welding and lower cost. any pattern like this will work. really heavy material like 2" with 1/4" walls won't require angle and gussets, and it can be square and simple. i chose to use lighter stuff, so the gussets are a prerequisite. i welded flat stock on the bottom of the legs so i could weld, not bolt, the casters into place. i used stationary casters up front and a single swivel with a brake in the rear. i have no doubt this is the best way to go if you're using wheels. if you choose to use skids then weld the flat stock on and leave it as is.



my legs were 28" high. the casters added nearly 4" and the bench was nearly 4" so i ended up with a 36" surface height. this is perfect for me. i use 7gallon buckets to set on and inside the buckets i leave for sandbags and other stuff for storage. i simply throw the bucket with all my things inside and covered, and roll the bench into storage when i'm done.







i used 2" channel, 1 1/2" angle iron and 1" square tubing for mine and it works well. keep in mind if you follow dimensions similar to these for the cement structure, you'll be pushing 450lbs... so buy your casters accordingly.






www.nra.org
Rob01
Member
Offline
Posts: 2402
Feedback: 100% (2)
Link To This Post
Posted: 10/31/2007 10:00:57 AM
[Last Edit: 10/31/2007 10:03:15 AM by Rob01]
Another excellent idea for a post from ST13. I tacked this up top because it will be perfect for the beginner and more advanced among us when we want to do a project or adjustment to our rifles and need a one stop place to find the answers or atleast point us in the right direction. Everyone who has something to add please post your projects or other helpful DIY projects.

Here's a couple basics I've found useful over the years
Adjusting the Remington Trigger
Adjusting the Winchester trigger
RobarSR60
Offline
Posts: 3868
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 10/31/2007 7:12:52 PM
Perfect...Now I'll have to dig out my DIY trigger job for the Remington.
septic-tank13
think for yourself... question authority...
Offline
Posts: 3717
Feedback: 100% (48)
Link To This Post
Posted: 10/31/2007 9:01:16 PM

Originally Posted By RobarSR60:
Perfect...Now I'll have to dig out my DIY trigger job for the Remington.

you might as well add your duracoat for beginners you posted on the hide as well. that kind of help would be great here!
www.nra.org
septic-tank13
think for yourself... question authority...
Offline
Posts: 3718
Feedback: 100% (48)
Link To This Post
Posted: 10/31/2007 10:25:52 PM
for those of you who'd like some extra texture on your grip and/or forend, this may help.

we start with a clean surface to work with. i use TCE from brownells, but many others cleaners/degreasers will work. we primarily want one that won't leave a film behind. some that are super aggresive may be hard on parts of the stock depending on many materials, paint, etc.



i like masking tape or something similar as it is easily applied and removed. on a tip from randy (Hateca) i started using a pen knife. it cuts less deeply than a carpet knife and is easier for me to handle. some folks use pin striping as well to get the edges the come out the way they'd like. i draw my favored area on with pen, and simply cut out the area i'd like to be covered.



i like marine tex, but steel bed is very common, in fact a little more preferred at times. marine tex has a distinct tendency to self-level if over applied. you need very little material on the stock and then it becomes a matter of patting and lifting with a tongue depressor or the likes. if you apply the material relatively thin and then smear it around you'll have plenty. pat and lift, pat and lift, until you get the desired effect. add material or remove material to make the texture more or less gritty to the touch.



wait around for 45 minutes or so, and remove the tape lifting straight away from the material. the material will still be semi-pliable - this is desired. at this point you can simply wet your finger and run it along the edges to smooth it down slightly. it'll have a more professional look and blend well.



follow the material instructions for drying/curing time and you're in business. paint is generally applied afterward, but brownells does offer dye packs in brown, black, gray, etc. it takes very little of this stuff to dye the mixture, so don't over do it.

otherwise you can paint it up.

before:



after:




www.nra.org
ziebart
Offline
Posts: 106
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/3/2007 5:41:10 PM
[Last Edit: 4/5/2009 7:03:43 PM by ziebart]
For the Savage shooters out there you may want to check out the savage shooters FAQ

Barrel Swap
You may want an action wrench instead of a bbl vise. If you are cheap make your own.

Listed below are some bbl makers that will make one that is chambered and threaded for Savage actions.
Sharp Shooters Supply
MidwayUSA
Pac-Nor
E R Shaw
E Arthur Brown Company
Lothar Walther
Northlander factory take off bbls available on savage shooter

If you are changing calibers with a different case head size ie 308 to 223 you will need to
swap bolt heads. If you are not sure what size bolt head to use please look here

You may also need to swap out your magazine and follower if you are using a different case type. These items are available from Midway USA among other retailers.

Tuning the pre accutrigger
piller bedding

007Kevin
Offline
Posts: 16
Feedback: 100% (2)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/4/2007 6:36:54 PM
Figured this info could go in this thread:

If your barrel isn't in the center of your stock (in particular Rem700P HS precision stocks) and want it to be,
1. unscrew the action and barrel from the stock
2. place a spacer that wont scratch stock or barrel between the two to center the barrel
3. screw the action and barrel back into the stock *** to specs (toque wrench is needed) ***

Not a huge thing like those shooting benches nor necessary but thought some might be interested
Lawman734
Team Member
Offline
Posts: 3001
Feedback: 96% (25)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/10/2007 1:37:13 PM
[Last Edit: 11/10/2007 1:44:01 PM by Lawman734]
.
Lawman734
Team Member
Offline
Posts: 3002
Feedback: 96% (25)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/10/2007 1:43:44 PM
[Last Edit: 3/16/2009 5:17:26 PM by Lawman734]
I forgot this was up and deleted it as this can damage a scope....
TacticalTim
Offline
Posts: 31
Feedback: 100% (29)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/12/2007 11:36:00 PM
[Last Edit: 11/12/2007 11:38:22 PM by TacticalTim]
I have one for ya....

I made a tripod for varmit & target shooting. First the rifle just rested on the tripod but this year, I decided that wasnt good enough.

So I did this:

This is the tripod that I bought from Wal-mart pretty cheap, but I guess you could always spend a grand on a tripod to do this. Painted it just because it was silver, then went black with green and some light for contrast depending on the location and usual conditions.
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p195/Tactical_Tim/DSCN2459.jpg

Predrilled 3 holes in the stock of my rifle and mounted the base, that would usually be mounted to the bottom of the camera etc. Then I attached it with 1" screws.
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p195/Tactical_Tim/DSCN2460.jpg

Mounts to tripod and your done.
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p195/Tactical_Tim/DSCN2461.jpg

You can rotate in any direction that you need.
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p195/Tactical_Tim/DSCN2464.jpg
Gibme
Offline
Posts: 152
Feedback: 100% (35)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/13/2007 10:19:17 PM
[Last Edit: 11/15/2007 10:19:29 AM by Gibme]
I'm not sure if all bases are like this or not, but I'm going to show how I bedded my 20 MOA Farrel Scope Base. (Thanks Hate CA, too many projects)

Things you will need:
-Epoxy (JB Weld, Steelbed, DEVCON, etc..)
-Release agent (Kiwi Neutral, Brownells stuff, etc..)
-De greaser
-Tongue depressors
-Masking Tape


First things first. I made sure my weapon was unloaded and removed the bolt. Then I took it all apart and degreased the receiver and scope base. I then applied my release agent (Kiwi) to the receiver and taped up the stock just in case. I also did this to all fastners.




While the Kiwi was drying, I roughed up the base with some sandpaper. I just wanted to take the finish off. I didn't want to smooth it out but I didn't want to change the shape either. I also applied some Kiwi to the base on the sides, front and back. After I finished, I cleaned the bottom again with some alcohol.



Ok, the kiwi should be dry. Give it one more coat and let it all dry. Try and relax, drink a cold beverage and think about how you may be gluing your base to your receiver forever. After about 10 minutes, the kiwi is dried. Mix up your epoxy. I used JB weld. Use your tongue depressors and cover the bottom of the base. You just skim coat it. You really don't need a bunch under there, but it's better to use a little to much rather than not enough. Did you get enough release agent on those screws? I inserted 2 into the base. One in the front and one in the back. They will help guide it all in. You really don't want it sliding all over the place. Ok, do it.




Ok, you need to remove the excess as best you can. I used the cardboard from the JB Weld package to scrape out all the edges. I think a tongue depressor would work as well. One that was shaped like a knife. I cleaned up the JB Weld that I couldn't get with the cardboard with a rag and some rubbing alcohol.





Now the waiting begins. Don't put your rifle in the cold garage or basement. It need's to be warm to cure. I gave mine a full 24 hours. At about 6 hours, I loosened and tightened the screws one by one to be sure that they didn't get stuck.

It all worked out in the end. I pulled the base off and it looked great. I then jacked it up as I used my finger to remove the little edge that was left. I chipped a little piece off the rear. I should have went out to the garage and got a flat needle file to clean it up. The chip is really small, but I may redo it. The chip is on the left in the center. Otherwise, it worked out well. I will skim bed the rifle in a couple days and post pics of that as well.



Hateca
Offline
Posts: 768
Feedback: 100% (25)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/14/2007 10:15:35 PM
That's not a Seekins scope base.
Gibme
Offline
Posts: 156
Feedback: 100% (35)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/18/2007 8:05:12 PM
I skim bedded my Remington 700 PSS this weekend and thought I would share. This ended up much easier than I had expected although I did twice. I had to do it twice because I did not use enough epoxy, as you guys will see in the pictures. I want to apologize in advance for the focus of some of the pictures.

I only have 8 rounds down the pipe on this one. I got it right before I deployed so I'm still breaking it in. I decided to bed it after looking at the stock and action. You can see where they have been rubbing under recoil in the pictures. It just seemed like it would be better to fully support the action. The gun shot well enough, but how well can you know after only 8 rounds?




I use the same stuff I used to bed my scope base a couple posts up. If the JB Weld ever crumbles I will try some Devcon. I heard that's the best to use, but the most expensive. I removed the scope for this, but left the rings to aid in setting the action back in the stock. After de-greasing, I masked off the action where the stock and the action meet. The second time I did this, I just used the release agent all over the stock. The tape is unnecessary.




I pulled the action out of the stock and removed the trigger. I may be a good idea to take a picture of the bolt stop and the spring that it uses. Next I filled all the little holes and the space where the trigger was with Playdough and covered everything with release agent. I just put it on thick with my finger. I did not re-coat after it was dried. Make sure you cover everything. The epoxy is going to squeeze out, over the top of the stock and action. Especially on the rear tang. Now is a good time to coat the hardware and the mag box. Almost forgot, you need to tape the recoil lug. Now, most guys will tell you to tape the backside, or the front and sides, etc... I taped the very bottom of the recoil lug and that is it. I used electrical tape to do it. My thought was I wanted it as tight as possible but I wanted someplace for a small amount of debris to go if any got in there. I never understood taping the backside, etc... Maybe someone can give a good reason for it. Make sure you go over the tape with release agent.



I set my barreled action to the side and started on the stock. This stock is an HS deal that comes on the 700PSS rifle. It has a aluminum bedding block that somewhat matches the shape of the action. You can see from the first few photos that it is not perfect.

I roughed up the bedding block and stock with 80 grit sandpaper and de-greased with rubbing alcohol. I also took a long hard look on where this stuff was going to flow and what had to be damned up.




The bottom photo shows a lot of clay that was probably not needed. The second time I did this, I didn't block that area up so much. I put clay right in front of the recoil lug. Some guys bed a little beyond that but I didn't see the point. People take great pains to free float the barrel, so I didn't want to work backwards.

So, I mixed up some JB weld and got to it. I put a ton in the recoil lug area. I really wanted to make sure I did not create a void in there. You can see from the pictures that I didn't apply enough JB Weld to the sides of the stock. For some reason I thought it would migrate where it needed to go, which was not the case. Anyway, along with not applying enough epoxy I didn't tape the sides of the stock up, which I did the second time.





I carefully set my action down into the stock and assembled the rifle. I have read that some guys tape it or use surgical tubing, but that didn't seem to make much sense for this application. I think those stories came from bedding a stock without a action block.
Once you but it all together, epoxy will squeeze out all over you stock and action. I just used a tongue depressor with a pointy tip to clean it off. I followed that up with some alcohol. Seemed to work just fine. This is the time where you need to be sure you don't have any mechanical locks developing. I put my rifle in a nice, dry, warm place and left it alone for 24 hrs. After 24hrs, I pulled the hardware out and tried to pull the action out. It didn't want to come out by hand. I couple taps with a mallet and it popped right out. This is what I saw.





Close but not what I had in mind. I realized that I needed to do it again. Now, I didn't have to remove the old stuff because it was fine, just not enough. I de-greased the stock and reapplied the release agent to the action. This time I taped the top of the stock up where the epoxy would seep onto and I did not tape the action. Repeat above and this is what I got.





These pictures where taken after I cleaned out the excess with a couple needle files and a box knife. It's not perfect but I think it's going to work as intended. I'm open to all questions/comments. This was my first time, so I would love to know some tips and tricks.
Ridge_runner
Member
Offline
Posts: 645
Feedback: 100% (6)
Link To This Post
Posted: 11/24/2007 11:19:55 PM
[Last Edit: 11/24/2007 11:21:49 PM by Ridge_runner]
please delete
RobarSR60
Offline
Posts: 4059
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 12/8/2007 3:06:45 AM
Here's the trigger job I did on my Remington...

This is for all of you who want your REMINGTON triggers tuned, and don’t want to spend the money to buy an expensive replacement like a Jewel, or Shillen, or Rifle Basics, or, or, or…It’s also for those of you who, like me, have some basic tools/skilz, and don’t think you need anyone else to do the job for you. Let me just say first though, to cover my ass, that I’m writing this NOT as a “how to”. I’m just letting you all know what I did to MY trigger, and how it’s worked out for ME. Your mileage may vary. This may or may NOT work with the newest Remington triggers. I take no responsibility for anyone that buggers themselves up (or their rifles) by attempting this.
That said, here we go…

Here’s a list of the tools that I found MOST helpful on this project. With out them, the job is nigh on impossible to accomplish…

Dremmel tool with polishing/buffing wheel (can substitute with very fine grit sand paper and honing oil)
Jeweler’s rouge or JB Bore Paste (I used the latter)
Micro screwdriver (flat head)
Various small punches (M16/AR15 punches will do nicely)
A small, light hammer or mallet
A larger, rubber mallet
Bolt disassembly tools

First things first…I removed the barreled action from the stock, and removed the bolt from the rifle. I cleaned the outside of the bolt thoroughly with solvent, and let it dry completely…
Next, I needed to remove the trigger. This was done by moving the safety lever to the rear (safe) position, and driving out the two pins holding the trigger housing to the bottom of the receiver. I made sure I paid attention to the side of the receiver with the bolt stop assembly. I OBSERVED THE WAY IT WENT TOGETHER AND REMEMBER IT…
After that was complete I needed to take the bolt apart. For this, I need two tools. Mine are both from Kleindorst, and I got them from Brownell’s. I hooked the tool on to the back of the bolt, locked it in place, and spun the cocking/firing pin assembly out from the main body of the bolt. I cleaned it thoroughly, and allowed it to dry completely…
I next needed to break down the firing pin assembly. I inserted the assembly into the tool, screwed it down tight, and removed the pin from the cocking piece that holds the whole thing together…
Now that the bolt was apart, and the trigger removed, the real work could begin. I looked very closely at all of the parts of the trigger and bolt. If I saw ANY place that had a contact or wear mark, those were the spots I hit with the Dremmel and polishing compound. I worked from the back of the bolt assembly forward, and then moved to the trigger.

I first observed a contact mark on the top of the cocking piece, so that got polished…
Next I moved to the lower part of the cocking piece, and polished the bearing surfaces there…
Having completed that, I turned my attention to the firing pin release and polished all of the surfaces that showed signs of contact. For giggles, and nothing else, I also polished the sides…
The next thing I did was observe how the trigger was put together, removed it from the receiver, completely disassembled it, made sure that I accounted for all of the pieces, and cleaned everything…
Now with the screws and springs removed from the trigger, I noticed that there was a small, metal piece that sits on top of the sear. It can be removed, and the top should be polished…
At this point the polishing work is done and the reassembly/tuning can begin. But there are some parts that can go in place of the OEM stuff that will GREATLY improve the feel and performance of the trigger/bolt assembly. Here’s a list of parts that I replaced, and where I got them…
Tubb aluminum firing pin and silicon carbide firing pin spring…This is sold through Midway and Brownell’s as the “Speedlock” system. It greatly improves lock time (the amount of time it takes the firing pin to go from fully cocked to fully extended), and the silicon carbide spring is of slightly tighter tolerance, so it won’t bind in the bolt housing like some of the OEM springs can. There are also other kits available that do the same thing.
Holland Gunsmith trigger spring kit…This kit consists of a lighter trigger return spring, and a heavier (piano wire) bolt stop spring. This can be had from various sources. I got mine from Midway, but they’re also available through Brownell’s.
Jard 9oz trigger return spring…These are really meant to go into the Jard trigger housing, and are ever so slightly oversized compared to OEM, but I found that with some coaxing they’ll fit into the Remington housing. Midway has these, and has them in various weights.

OK! So with the new parts gathered together, reassembly can begin...
First, I reassemble the firing pin assembly in the opposite manner in which it was pulled it apart. Very simple, very easy…
Next, I screwed the whole thing back into the body of the bolt using the appropriate tool. No lube is needed on anything here. It only attracts dirt, and decreases the performance of the new parts…
This can now be set aside, and my attention was then focused where it’s gonna be needed the most…The reassembly and tuning of the trigger. First, I replaced the part that fits over the sear (polished side UP please!)…
Next I replaced the top, front screw into the trigger housing. It’s the longer of the two screws that has a ‘post’ on the end…
Next, I inserted the trigger return spring into the bottom, front screw hole and replaced the trigger return screw. It’s the shorter of the two screws with a ‘post’ on the end. I was VERY careful inserting that spring. I didn’t want to bugger it up…
I then replaced the sear engagement screw, in the back of the trigger housing, and screwed it in about ¾ of the way…
Next, I moved the safety lever to the rear (safe) position, and made sure that the firing pin release and its corresponding spring were in the trigger housing. I held the front in place with one of the punches, and held the rear in place with the longer of the two trigger pins…
I then returned the trigger to the receiver, paying careful attention to keeping everything aligned properly. At this point, the bolt release and its heavier spring can be reinstalled. This is a little tricky, and involves some serious attention to detail (as well as both of those punches)…
Now that the trigger assembly was in place, I reinstalled the bolt assembly and started adjusting the trigger…
This is where a little bit of the ‘voodoo’ happens, but it’s nothing too hard. I started by adjusting the over travel screw. This gets screwed out until the trigger return spring positively engages the trigger (but I’m not done with it just yet).
At this point, I turned my attention to the sear engagement screw. Now if you look at the receiver/trigger from the right side, you’ll see a small hole in the top left corner of the trigger, just in front of the sear screw hole. This small hole actually allows you to observe the sear engagement. If you look closely, you’ll see the firing pin release sitting on top of the sear. The more you move the sear screw in, the less it contacts the firing pin release. If you adjust it carefully enough, with the bolt in the cocked position, you’ll feel the tension that the firing pin spring puts on the whole mechanism. Now, WITH THE BOLT IN THE COCKED POSITION, I turn the sear screw clockwise until the firing pin releases. When it drops, I turn the screw back at least ¼ of a turn. At this point, I adjusted my over travel screw again. I like a trigger with very little movement, so I turned the screw in until I got it where I wanted it. Next, I adjusted the trigger return screw in or out, depending on how heavy or light I wanted the trigger pull. Lastly, I went back to the sear engagement screw and readjusted it, if needs be. Remember, each time the one of the screws is adjusted, the bolt needs to be cycled and in the cocked position so you can test the trigger pull. When I got the trigger where I wanted it, I needed to test it to see if it was safe. I did this by replacing the barreled action in the stock and torquing it down. I then cocked the bolt and gave the stock a right mighty “WHACK” on the butt pad with the rubber mallet. If the bolt holds position, I’m good to go. If it drops, I need to continue adjusting the sear and trigger return until it’s safe.

Anyway, this is what I did with MY trigger and bolt assembly. I’m very pleased with the results. The trigger is smooth, light, crisp, and breaks like a thin glass rod. The lock time is ‘right now’ fast, and keeps me on target longer.
Does the trigger break at 9oz like the trigger spring advertises? Well, probably not. But it is significantly lighter than stock, and that’s what counts. With the cost of tools and parts, is it worth the money to do it yourself vs. having a gunsmith do it? Well, it was to ME. I now know part of what goes into a good trigger job, and with the tools I’ve acquired, I can do multiple trigger jobs down the road. I’ve also gained a better understanding of what is happening mechanically with the trigger. If something should go wrong with it, I can fix it myself as opposed to having to send it out for repair. I think it’s a worthwhile expense. In any case, it’s really an easy project, when done carefully, and one that can be done in a couple of lazy hours in front of the TV.
buckeyeGM15
Offline
Posts: 10
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 12/24/2007 7:14:11 PM
i am lookin to start a self build project and cannot find a place that offers remington 700 actions and that is what i would like to use. any help would be great.
septic-tank13
think for yourself... question authority...
Offline
Posts: 3962
Feedback: 100% (48)
Link To This Post
Posted: 12/24/2007 7:21:23 PM

Originally Posted By buckeyeGM15:
i am lookin to start a self build project and cannot find a place that offers remington 700 actions and that is what i would like to use. any help would be great.


depending on action length and bolt face size, midwayusa.com sells them currently. i think they just had a sale on them a few days back.
www.nra.org
buckeyeGM15
Offline
Posts: 11
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 12/24/2007 8:01:40 PM
i just looked at their website.. found it through a google search.. they seem to only have .308s left and i would prefer to get a 300 winmag , it also said something about remington discontinuing them...ill have to do a more thorough search when i have the time. thanks for the reply!
buckeyeGM15
Offline
Posts: 12
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 12/24/2007 8:11:24 PM
nevermind i found a few more.. thanks
Stillbuster
Offline
Posts: 26
Feedback: 100% (47)
Link To This Post
Posted: 1/5/2008 11:33:48 PM
buck I feel your pain.
I have found what was more economical for me was prowling the local pawn/gunshops eventually I bought the whole rifle for less than an action alone at brownells or midway. Yep I have a used action, but I can part the whole rifle out and get an even better deal!
Even if the rifle is not the right caliber follow the directions from a couple of posts above and you can have whatever caliber you want.
septic-tank13
think for yourself... question authority...
Offline
Posts: 4037
Feedback: 100% (48)
Link To This Post
Posted: 1/16/2008 7:54:15 AM
[Last Edit: 1/17/2008 8:59:12 AM by septic-tank13]
RobarSR60,

can you post a link to your duracoat tutorial?

thanks,



ST13
www.nra.org
RobarSR60
Offline
Posts: 4174
Feedback: 0% (0)
Link To This Post
Posted: 1/16/2008 10:45:06 AM

Originally Posted By septic-tank13:
compliments of RobarSR60:


Septic's been after me for while to repost this. I didn't find it here, but I did find the original post on Sniper's Hide (and the pictures even work!!). So here you go...

Duracoat 101...
septic-tank13
think for yourself... question authority...
Offline
Posts: 4044
Feedback: 100% (48)
Link To This Post
Posted: 1/16/2008 10:50:16 AM
thanks!
www.nra.org
Bujesus
Offline
Posts: 450
Feedback: 100% (1)
Link To This Post
Posted: 1/17/2008 2:47:08 AM

Originally Posted By RobarSR60:

Originally Posted By septic-tank13:
compliments of RobarSR60:


Septic's been after me for while to repost this. I didn't find it here, but I did find the original post on Sniper's Hide (and the pictures even work!!). So here you go...

Duracoat 101...


Why can't I grow some testes and Duracoat my rifle in ACU myself?
Renn
Offline
Posts: 1127
Feedback: 100% (25)
Link To This Post
Posted: 2/12/2008 8:21:26 PM
I just bedded my Savage with Marine tex but I think I added too little catalyst. On its second day and it is still slightly pliable. I 've added a UV light and and heat gun to it but it is still not hardened.
Any ideas?
  Previous Page
Page:  / 4