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6/21/2017 8:25:40 PM
Posted: 5/31/2012 10:04:45 AM EDT
What do you guys think is the best reloading manual? One that covers MOST of the bases and looks very nice with lots of information and nice pictures and such?
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 10:16:12 AM EDT
I like my Lyman the best, but have hornady, Sierra and 3 others I look at. I use them all when starting out developing a load
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 10:30:13 AM EDT
BESIDES having the ABC's of Reloading book ( great info and good to read/review every now and again) I have the newest Lymann edition. IMO that covers the most. BUT, since i load Hornady A-max I have a Hornady manual and cause i load alot of Sierra Match Kings, I have a Sierra. I have 1 other one, but forget who its by. its more of a "rolodex" type. I prob use this the most, but have notes on it for my .223 and .308 for the other pet loads.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 10:52:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/31/2012 10:54:33 AM EDT by splunkinoob]
Probably going to take a lot of heat for this, I don't own a manual, taught my self to load through free resources online. There is a ton of free reloading data from manufactures online and most will answer questions directly if you call or email them. In addition, there are forums like this that are a plethora of information.

However, if you choose to do this, take what you read with a grain of salt, verify information against other sources, and in general use common sense.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 10:54:57 AM EDT
to me the lee modern reloading is worthless for the most part leaving out allot of the common powders I use. that being said it does cover quite a number gr for each caliber. I like the sierra, Hornady's is nice to have but lacks cast loads, lyman has cast but seems a bit limited on some calibers. seems like most push certain brands. for example if you load for precision and shoot sierra,speer,hornady non common grainers then it may be helpful to buy sierra,hornady,lyman ect. not a huge fan of barnes and nosler mostly because the bullets arn't readily available in my local reloading shops. the ABS'S is great to read and referance loaded with info. I really like the sierra if were just talking info easy to understand and gives insight into certain topics.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 11:00:51 AM EDT
Just getting in to it.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 11:02:14 AM EDT
I dont think there is one that covers everything! I like the ones from the reloading companies, Lee, RCBS, Lyman, Redding, books like that cover a wider varity of bullets and powders from several manufactures, the ones from bullet and powder companies mainly revolve around their product, but usally give the best info for their products and a more complete listing. So a reloading manual turns into a reloading libary after a few years and a few different calibers to reload!
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 11:05:56 AM EDT
I like the Lyman manuals as well for data. But right now I have damn near every manual I can get my hands on. The Hodgdon's yearly manual has quite a bit of solid info and the Lee reloading book has TONS of loads to work with as well.

IMO, buy as many as you can afford. Referencing several manuals when working up loads can only provide you with more insight on where to start. I can't tell you the number of times I have had 3-4 manuals open just picking through data and comparing the manufacturer's differences.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 11:07:06 AM EDT
Lyman has always been my "go to" reloading manual.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 12:31:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 12:36:55 PM EDT
You need more than one anyway.

Link Posted: 5/31/2012 1:59:06 PM EDT
I cross reference all of my manuals, although I seem to favor Lyman and Speer. Hornady is a nice manual but they seem to have lower "max charge" than any other manual. Lee has a ton of info, but does lack some powders. Speer has a TON of different calibers, including some that others don't offer, 9mm Largo being the first that comes to my mind. I started with Lee, if I had a choice I would start with Lyman, then Speer, then Lee, then Hornady. But...If you load a lot of Hornady, or Speer, or Sierra, that would take priority for me.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 2:53:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By brickeyee:
You need more than one anyway.


True, but I don't own one yet, and so I am looking for the people's favorite
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 3:08:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:

Originally Posted By brickeyee:
You need more than one anyway.


True, but I don't own one yet, and so I am looking for the people's favorite


Hornady came with my classic kit. Haven't used another but I like it pretty well. Kinda pisses me off that they don't have info for other bullet makers but I've been shooting Hornady anyway so it has worked out.

I think I'm gonna pick up Lyman next

Good luck,
Paul
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 3:56:28 PM EDT
All very good advice, I use the speer quite a bit and also the freebes from the manufacturers are quite good,like most say you can never have enough
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 4:14:21 PM EDT
The very best one depends on what I'm doing for powder and bullets. If I don't have the information I need, I procure it. No one manual does it all.

Closest we have to one stop resource is quickload. I might trust it but I'm gonna cross reference to multiple sources anyhow.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 4:20:59 PM EDT
I like my Speer Reloading Manual better than my Lee.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 4:47:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By unknownhavoc:
I cross reference all of my manuals, although I seem to favor Lyman and Speer. Hornady is a nice manual but they seem to have lower "max charge" than any other manual. Lee has a ton of info, but does lack some powders. Speer has a TON of different calibers, including some that others don't offer, 9mm Largo being the first that comes to my mind. I started with Lee, if I had a choice I would start with Lyman, then Speer, then Lee, then Hornady. But...If you load a lot of Hornady, or Speer, or Sierra, that would take priority for me.


I would start with the Lee, it seems to have more loads in it than the Lyman. I need more books, those are the two I have, and they are quite different on some things. When there is a conflict, I go to the powder manufacturers website to settle the dispute.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 4:55:50 PM EDT
Let's visit about those Speer manuals for a second. Speer is owned by who ?


ATK.


ATK owns Speer, Alliant, RCBS, Federal, CCI.

Lee has managed to compile more load data than anyone using largest variety of powder and primers.

Speer manual is done for Speer, using ATK components.

Try getting data from Alliant for R17 & 208 amax. Sure Speer has one man to answer calls at tech desk. Have called, left message , have yet to hear from him.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 5:32:36 PM EDT
Lyman. Unless you prefer a particular bullet brand, then get theirs. Also many powder companies list data online. None will have every bullet or powder.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 8:57:36 PM EDT
in my opinion i'd pick up a few. they each cover the same basics, it's nice to read up the same info put into different words(to me anyways) gives me a broader understanding i guess.

different manuals also offer other tid bits here and there that differ from each manual. and they aren't to expensive per manual so just pick up a few manufacturers, you'll have alot of good resources to pull from
Link Posted: 6/1/2012 9:52:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/1/2012 9:52:57 AM EDT by borderpatrol]
Buy the reloading manual produced by the bullet manufacturer you intend to load. They have the most experience with their bullets and their data will verify that. Hornady uses pressure testing and their data is lower because of it. Sierra's is my other must have.

I do not like any data that uses a generic bullets (unamed) of a specific weight. I don't like Speer's data or powder manufacturer's data because it's much higher than other sources. Pay close attention to barrel length, chamber used, actual component selection, i.e. brass, primer make, etc. because it makes a difference in the end result.

I have two rules I always follow:
1. Never exceed maximum velocity as listed for any load provided my barrel is the same length as theirs. If my barrel is shorter I subtract at least 100 fps from their maximum velocity, more if it's an AR15 with a 16" barrel (-250 fps).

2. Never exceed their maximum powder charge as listed by the bullet makers data. I always start lower and work up to maximum. I use a chronograph. I have all my fingers and both of my eyes using this method.
Link Posted: 6/1/2012 11:43:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/1/2012 11:43:35 AM EDT by handym3000]
i own lyman, hornady the newest edition
i use the hornady the most. i like tall of the info they give you over the lyman book.
Link Posted: 6/1/2012 12:34:18 PM EDT
I have stacks of them but I start with the Lyman for general use, Lyman cast bullet for cast loads and as I like Sierra rifle bullets I generally start
rifle loads with Sierra.

I like Hornady for the charts and tables in the back and Speer has reduced loads for most rifle calibers.

If I have a certain brand of bullets I am trying to use I start with that companys manual

If I decide on a certain brand of powder I will check that manual or website
Link Posted: 6/1/2012 2:57:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
Lyman 49 without a doubt. The best general purpose manual.

Has rifle and pistol jacketed and cast/lead bullet loads.

Also a great "How to reload section".

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/How%20To/P9100412.jpg


I have to agree, when I was learning I read that book more times than I care to count.
Also use it along with the powder manufacture website to work up loads.
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