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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
Posted: 9/15/2009 2:34:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 1:18:51 PM EDT by AeroE]
I haven't seen one of these yet so I figured since I was starting out my operation, I would snap some pics and publish my schematics.

These are basic plans for building a rock solid 2x4 foot 3-layer reloading/work bench at a comfortable height to use a 29" bar stool.
*NOTE––I recommend using a proportionate amount of beer to measuring tools according to your level of woodworking skill.

Basic plans:




Redrawn and donated by a member that wants to remain anonymous. AeroE :



Materials:
(4x) 2"x4"x8'
(2x) 4"x4"x8'
(1x) 2"x8"x6'
(3x) 2'x4'x 3/4" plywood or MDF
(2lbs) 3" drywall screws
(14x) 3/8"x4" lag screw w/washers
(2x) 3/8"x6"lag screws w/washers

Recommended Tools:
Power Miter Saw
Drill
Framing Square
Level
Tape Measure



Get everything measured and cut to make the upper and lower frames


Assemble upper and lower frames using 3" screws. Be sure to use a framing square on hard level surface (I assembled these on the cement porch)


Attach frames to corner posts with 4" lag screws. Drill pilot holes and use washers. Again, use a square and level so everything comes out strait. (note extra block attached where press will be mounted)


Attach shelf risers with 6" lag screws. Square up and secure with 3" screws. Level and attach shelf with 3" screws


Square up and attach lower and upper ply/MDF surfaces. I used 3/8" rough plywood for the lower and 3/4" rough plywood for the upper. Then I laminated a piece of smooth sanded 3/4" birch plywood on the top for the work surface.


Now just attach your favorite accessories and load up with supplies. If necessary, secure to wall studs with lag screws to eliminate any wiggle during resizing operations on large calibers.




Link Posted: 9/15/2009 2:59:30 AM EDT
Nice build. I prefer one that has an open base to slide my chair under but whatever works for you
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 4:00:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/15/2009 4:04:31 AM EDT by EWP]
Very similar to the benches I built except I banded the top with 2"x6"'s instead of 2"x4"s and I went about the shelves a little different and used duel 2'x4' sheets of 3/4" a/c plywood for the bench tops for added strength. Here is a photo of a similar bench but built 2'x3' for storage and case prep beside the one I use to load on.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 4:28:19 AM EDT
Good setup––I'm sure I will find myself adding shelves and maybe even pegboard sometime in the future to make more room. I wanted to get some 3/4" melamine to use as a bench top but I had trouble tracking it down here locally. I have heard of people using old counter tops, steel plate, and even acrylic plexyglass as work surfaces so its pretty much builder's choice when it comes to that; although I'm not too sure how the plexy would hold up to chemical exposure (cleaners, solvents, oils, etc.), and the metal plate would be a major PITA when it came to mounting new equipment
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 6:10:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Crazy_Harry:
I wanted to get some 3/4" melamine to use as a bench top but I had trouble tracking it down here locally. I have heard of people using old counter tops, steel plate, and even acrylic plexyglass as work surfaces so its pretty much builder's choice when it comes to that; although I'm not too sure how the plexy would hold up to chemical exposure (cleaners, solvents, oils, etc.), and the metal plate would be a major PITA when it came to mounting new equipment


I made my benchtop with laminations. Two laminates of 5/8" CDX plywood, one layer of 3/4" particle board, and a top layer of 1/8" hardboard. Glue and screw the plywood and particle board together. Apply the hardboard top with contact cement. Solid and over 2" thick for about $20.00.

Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:20:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 10:39:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/15/2009 10:54:24 AM EDT by cvann]
I left mine open at the bottom - used leftover 2X6's, 3/4" OSB, and masonite. Fastened with 3" decking screws and tapcons to the masonry. Less than $20 in material.

ETA - I also mounted a 48" shoplight above it, and utilized the racking for component and toolhead storage.

Link Posted: 9/15/2009 10:54:50 AM EDT
It's so much easier to go to SEARS and buy a sheet metal workbench with a wood top. Mine has been more than adequate for 7 years now.... has drawers, shelves, etc. Dillon strong mount bolts right to it and you're done.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 12:17:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By markm:
It's so much easier to go to SEARS and buy a sheet metal workbench with a wood top. Mine has been more than adequate for 7 years now.... has drawers, shelves, etc. Dillon strong mount bolts right to it and you're done.

Yes, though I'm betting you'd have a very difficult time getting Sears to alter the size of the workbench to match your specific space requirements.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 4:58:13 PM EDT
I would need to up size that by quite a bit. I've got 4x shotgun presses, 4x single stage presses, and a dillon 650. I'll have to look this thread up after I build my shop.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 5:03:53 PM EDT
Originally Posted By markm:
It's so much easier to go to SEARS and buy a sheet metal workbench with a wood top. Mine has been more than adequate for 7 years now.... has drawers, shelves, etc. Dillon strong mount bolts right to it and you're done.


I guess if you aren't into building than the flimsy work benches would be OK, and cost way more than a solid wood bench built custom to your needs.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 7:53:09 PM EDT
You did a great job on your bench. I hope it's in a "man" room. My wife doesn't allow such things in spaces we share. Not even pink paint would help.

–I recommend using a proportionate amount of beer to measuring tools according to your level of woodworking skill.
It appears you didn't need the beer. Your cuts and fit look great.

Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:00:20 PM EDT
Soon I will be a reloading fool, I can't wait.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:56:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GWhis:
You did a great job on your bench. I hope it's in a "man" room. My wife doesn't allow such things in spaces we share. Not even pink paint would help.

–I recommend using a proportionate amount of beer to measuring tools according to your level of woodworking skill.
It appears you didn't need the beer. Your cuts and fit look great.



Ha well the only other place it would fit is the kitchen and that wasn't happening

––nothing beats a miter saw for keeping things strait I almost felt like I was cheating
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:56:18 PM EDT
Thanks....I'm needing a new bench.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 11:43:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 3:33:22 PM EDT by jonblack]
It looks like your 4X4 lumber is pressure treated. Be sure to use approved fasteners (hot dip galvanized, stainless steel, etc) when using pressure treated wood products. This will reduce the possibility of your fasteners failing.

Nice article explaining why using the right fastener is important

Hope this helps
jonblack

*edited for speeling typo! Yeah I know, I misspeeled "spelling."
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 1:15:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 1:17:24 PM EDT by AeroE]
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:32:02 PM EDT
Excellent. Yes, I used galvanized hardware
Link Posted: 3/28/2012 10:26:16 AM EDT
Older thread, but is just what I was looking for. I need something stronger than the one I'm currently using. Thanks for the idea's from everyone....
Link Posted: 3/28/2012 11:42:11 AM EDT
Very nice. I left the bottom of mine open so that I could push my stools in but built a lower shelf for storage. I also had a local sheet metal shop break a piece of galvanized steel for my work surface.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 7:18:42 PM EDT
Resurrected!! Was in need of this write up
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 7:28:26 PM EDT
That's a nice stout bench. I used 2x6's for mine.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 9:21:45 PM EDT
Run 2x4 cross braces, in opposite directions, on both sides for added rigidity.
Link Posted: 1/11/2014 2:03:03 PM EDT
I don't feel TOO bad posting to this thread since it's been dug up fairly recently.

I'm about to build another reloading bench, and my current one (which is not at all rock solid) moves just enough with every stroke of a press that whatever is stacked on it slightly shifts, eventually causing an avalanche. I was going to actually isolate the bench itself from any shelves to prevent this sort of thing from happening, but from all the above posts, movement seems to be a non-issue as long as the bench is sturdily built. I assume this is the issue or people would be actively solving it. Can anybody confirm that a bench built in the ways described in this thread won't cause the issues I've described?

Thanks, all.
Link Posted: 1/11/2014 3:35:38 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 50BMGdoesitforme:
I don't feel TOO bad posting to this thread since it's been dug up fairly recently.

I'm about to build another reloading bench, and my current one (which is not at all rock solid) moves just enough with every stroke of a press that whatever is stacked on it slightly shifts, eventually causing an avalanche. I was going to actually isolate the bench itself from any shelves to prevent this sort of thing from happening, but from all the above posts, movement seems to be a non-issue as long as the bench is sturdily built. I assume this is the issue or people would be actively solving it. Can anybody confirm that a bench built in the ways described in this thread won't cause the issues I've described?

Thanks, all.
View Quote


If you have access to a decent drill press and a hacksaw or metal-cutting bandsaw, I would grab some short pieces of angle iron, and use them to anchor your table to your studwalls. If you can put the table in a corner and do so to two walls, you can easily turn a not-so-solid setup into something extremely solid.
Link Posted: 1/11/2014 8:33:35 PM EDT
I can`t post a pic right now but in my shop I built a HUGE reloading bench. Two 650`s plus a Redding turret plus a ton of other stuff. I then put it on four "car rollers" so I can move it around. When I`m not using it I roll it in front of a matching component steel warehouse style storage rack which houses my Sartorius scale along with all my tipping & trimming stuff. When I "unfold " it the entire work area is 16 ft. long. By doing this I am able to cover the entire operation with a single tarp for dust reasons ( all of it is inside my work shop). By adding a roll around portable air conditioner along with portable heaters I can now work anytime during the year comfortably.

I`m using salvaged cabinets for powder storage (multiple types) and the steel shelving allows me to store hundreds of lbs. of projos and brass. The steel rack is way to heavy ( loaded) to move around but the reloading bench is a cinch. One hand rolling on concrete! It saves me sooooo much space by doing this. I have a permanent power supply mounted on the back of the reloading bench with all cords from all equipment funneling under the bench to it. This allows me to start reloading almost immediately with only a minute or two of set up time.

The only other equipment not included in this set up is my Giraud trimmer and annealer along with my tumblers all of which I have in a different area for safety and clean up reasons.

I`ll try and get some pics soon. Satellite internet sucks but the trade off is not living in the city.
Link Posted: 1/11/2014 8:37:39 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/27/2014 12:41:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/27/2014 12:46:14 PM EDT by Lori406]
Just built one of these lovely things for my honey for our anniversary. He was using a table he made out of old wood he found at his parents place before they moved and downsized, which forced him to need to move his stuff. The one that he had would flex so bad when he would punch primers he would have to use one hand to hold the press in place to keep it from flexing so much. there are wear marks on his press from his hands. He was pretty excited about this one when we picked it up. I work in a lumber yard and was able to get this stuff for pretty cheap but this is what we used:

(1) 1/4" Hickory Plywood
(4) 2X4X96 Pine
(2) 4X4X96 Fir Post's
(20) 3/8" Oak Plugs (mostly because the other ones we had for whatever reason were smaller than 3/8")
(1) 3/4" x 33" x 96" Hickory Countertop Material (butcher block look)
(20') 1 X 6 Hickory S4S Lumber
(30') Hickory Outside Corner Molding
(?) 9 X 3" T20 bit Screws
Wood Glue
Wood Filler
Impact Driver

We predrilled and countersunk everything so we wouldnt split the hickory. I used hickory because not only is it beautiful (after all it is going to be furniture in my house) but it is also very very tough. This thing is so sturdy that NOTHING moves on the rest of this bench when he uses it.

Thank you for the plans!



Link Posted: 8/27/2014 2:15:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/27/2014 2:17:40 PM EDT by dryflash3]
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