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6/21/2017 8:25:40 PM
Posted: 1/17/2009 10:52:12 AM EDT
I do not have a reloading manual handy, and I'm looking to buy power to reload for my black rifle. What are some good brands, and the right type to buy––shopping on Midway USA.
Link Posted: 1/17/2009 11:28:02 AM EDT
Depends on what bullet(s) you plan on using. Is this for match shooting or just blasting? You tell us which direction you're going in and we can tell you what to expect and look for along that path.
Link Posted: 1/17/2009 11:30:58 AM EDT
The best thing to do is to look at the reloading database above and decide on specifications you want to start with (bullet weight, speed...). Then see what powder they use and the amount.

I personally use H335 at 24gr for a 55gr fmjbt and CCI400 (or 450) primer. It gives me reliable round that I use for plinking and CQB matches.

If you order from Midway, you will pay an additional $20 fee to transport dangerous materials. It sounds like you're just getting into reloading, so I would encourage you to go to your local gun shop and buy some primers/powder there to start with.
Link Posted: 1/18/2009 2:22:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By willstill:
The best thing to do is to look at the reloading database above and decide on specifications you want to start with (bullet weight, speed...). Then see what powder they use and the amount.

I personally use H335 at 24gr for a 55gr fmjbt and CCI400 (or 450) primer. It gives me reliable round that I use for plinking and CQB matches.

If you order from Midway, you will pay an additional $20 fee to transport dangerous materials. It sounds like you're just getting into reloading, so I would encourage you to go to your local gun shop and buy some primers/powder there to start with.


Good advice, but not so good for me...
My local guy charges too much for powder...$36.00 for IMR4895... hell that's almost like paying the hazmat fee on every jug...No wonder all the jugs are covered with dust. LOL
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:55:18 PM EDT
thanks for the info guys, I am loading 55gr, and I have realized that most gun shops here in Corpus Christi TX stick you with the hazmat fee anyway. Well here is the list purchased as of 01-23-09:

RCBS 2-DIE SET 223 Remington
Hornady Case care kit
RCBS Reloader Special-5 Single Press
Lee Case length Gage and Shellholder 223 Rem
CCI small rifle military primers box of 1000
Lee Case Trimmer Cutter and Lock Stud
L.E Wilson Case Trimmer
Lyman Primer Pocket Reamer Tool Small
Lee Universal Shellholder #4 17 rem, 204, 223 rem.

I know I'm missing some major stuff, but any advice from you seasoned guys is always appreciated
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 7:03:16 PM EDT
If your new to reloading plz buy a couple of manuals before doing anything.

I use 25gr of H335 for a 55gr fmj. It's the best for me right now.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 7:03:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2009 7:04:58 PM EDT by wheatons83]
I forgot I've got 2000 once fired lake city brass I pick up off the range, with those damn crimps Which sends me directly to purchase the dillon swager tool for 95 bones, before a can really do anything Do any of you guys reload alot of mil brass?
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 7:06:23 PM EDT
If your new to reloading plz buy a couple of manuals before doing anything.

I use 25gr of H335 for a 55gr fmj. It's the best for me right now.



what types of manuals?
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 7:24:51 PM EDT
Military brass is all I use. If you dont like to decrimp the primer pocket just send it to me.

There are plenty of books out there.. Lyman, Speers, Lee, etc..
If your a beginner get the ABC's of reloading..
Link Posted: 1/24/2009 7:18:20 AM EDT
I like to use the manual from the bullet manufacturer and start there. Please use two or three different ones to cross check. (it's for the chillen)
Link Posted: 1/24/2009 7:24:40 AM EDT
Military brass is all I use. If you dont like to decrimp the primer pocket just send it to me.

There are plenty of books out there.. Lyman, Speers, Lee, etc..
If your a beginner get the ABC's of reloading..


Bro, at my range nobody picks up spent mil brass! Without exaggerating I could spent all day and never come close to picking it all up!
Link Posted: 1/24/2009 9:46:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By wheatons83:
I forgot I've got 2000 once fired lake city brass I pick up off the range, with those damn crimps Which sends me directly to purchase the dillon swager tool for 95 bones, before a can really do anything Do any of you guys reload alot of mil brass?


Mil brass is pretty much all I reload. That mainly has to do with the price though ($60 shipped per 1k off the EE). Best part is you only have to remove the crimp once.

As to your question about what manuals to buy. Check the stickies at the top of the forums and you'll find this info :

Q: Which reloading manual(s) should I buy first?

A: The first manual you should buy is the "ABC's of Reloading" by Bill Chevalier . As soon as possible, every hand loader should buy every manual he can afford, and borrow the rest. The following is a Must Read list, especially for beginners -
* Speer Reloading Manual,
* Hornady Handbook (in particular the 7th Edition manual published in 2007),
* Hodgon No. 27 Data Manual,
* Modern Reloading by Richard Lee,
* Metallic Cartridge Reloading by M. L. McPherson,
* Lyman Reloading Handbooks,
* Nosler Reloading Guide #5,
* Loadbooks USA Reloading Manuals (these are caliber specific), and
* Sierra "5th Edition Rifle and Handgun Manual of Reloading Data" Book

I also recommend The P.O. Ackley Handbook for Shooters and Reloaders. Every manual contains tidbits of information that might not be covered in another manual, and for this reason old manuals, particularly the Lyman manual, are valuable additions. AeroE

The reading portion of reloading is as important as the actual hands on physical portion. In fact some would venture to state that the reading portion is more important. The reading portion gives you all the do's and don'ts, why's and how's, some history of the cartridge etc. All of the recommended books above and most any others have some very pertinent information preceeding the actual load data for your particular cartridge. Don't miss out on this information. mack69
Link Posted: 1/24/2009 10:47:08 AM EDT
The NRA has a great little book on reloading. Spiral bound it covers all the bases. Pistol rifle and shotshell loading. No recipes, but it shows you how it's done.

NRA
Link Posted: 1/24/2009 2:06:43 PM EDT
thank you stud-anowski!
Link Posted: 1/24/2009 3:19:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/24/2009 3:24:05 PM EDT by KB7DX]
Originally Posted By willstill:
The best thing to do is to look at the reloading database above and decide on specifications you want to start with (bullet weight, speed...). Then see what powder they use and the amount.

I personally use H335 at 24gr for a 55gr fmjbt and CCI400 (or 450) primer. It gives me reliable round that I use for plinking and CQB matches.

If you order from Midway, you will pay an additional $20 fee to transport dangerous materials. It sounds like you're just getting into reloading, so I would encourage you to go to your local gun shop and buy some primers/powder there to start with.


I use this exact load and h335 is hard to beat. Generally speaking, h335 for lighter bullets up to 62g or so, and Varget for heavier pills.
ETA–– pick up ALL the brass you can, you will thank me later.
Link Posted: 1/24/2009 4:00:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By wheatons83:
If your new to reloading plz buy a couple of manuals before doing anything.

I use 25gr of H335 for a 55gr fmj. It's the best for me right now.



what types of manuals?


Start with Hornaday #7 and Sierra #5 reloading manuals.

Both have sections on reloading for gas operated rifles.

Top of the page in Forum Resources, under Tutorials is a 4 part "how to load 223".

Read this it will show you the reloading process and explain Why each step is done.

Read the FAQs also, will save you from a dumb post.

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