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teggy1
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Posted: 10/4/2008 10:38:08 AM
200 grn rnfp cast bullets from missouri bullet co. curious as to the seating depth is critical or not, I seated to 4 different lengths and the one that seemed to feed, and eject most reliably are at 1.220. Is bullet seating depth critical to anything other than pressure in the 45 acp? I am starting at 4.6 grns of bullseye, and will work up to the max.

will be running through an XD and my brothers P90.
918v
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Posted: 10/4/2008 2:44:53 PM
Seat them so that you have enough bullet shank in the case to hold it securely.
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ma96782
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Posted: 10/4/2008 2:58:14 PM
[Last Edit: 10/4/2008 3:21:44 PM by ma96782]
Handloading comes with some risk. And, handloading is part experimentation at times. Know what your personal comfort (risk) level is.

Among the many WARNINGS that the reloading books have published, is the load data. Data, that they have tested and considered to be SAFE loads. Most books will state what brand of powder and how much powder to use, primer, brass, and COAL.

But, what you may have on hand, may not exactly match with what the book used. And, what's the use of COAL given in a book.....IF, the ammo you made, won't feed through your firearm?

So, I will at times.........consider what the book said as a, "start or suggestion." I know that I could "tweak" the loads to a point.

But, consider your own, "pucker factor."

That's why the book also says to start 10% below maximum.

Aloha, Mark





XMM
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Posted: 10/4/2008 2:59:24 PM
If 1.220" feeds reliably in your gun(s) continue to load as such. That's within recommended .45acp OAL range.
teggy1
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Posted: 10/4/2008 3:52:45 PM

Originally Posted By XMM:
If 1.220" feeds reliably in your gun(s) continue to load as such. That's within recommended .45acp OAL range.


I haven't seen anything on a "range" for COL? Is there a minimum and a maximum for each bullet type, or is it something as a light bullet may be set back to X.XXX and a heavy bullet should be set to X.XXX?
nhsport
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Posted: 10/4/2008 4:17:32 PM
With 45acp it is the bullet itself that slides along the feed ramp (part of the barrel just behind the chamber) as the bullet is being pushed out of the magazine and into the chamber. The length of the overall cartridge from the rear of the case to whatever part of the bullet that contacts the angled ramp can determine the orientation of the cartridge. Yes it can be critical.
When you have a long tapered bullet like a 230rn it seems to be less critical as the taper of the bullet more or less matches the angle of the ramp and the bullet and cartridge just slides into the chamber.
When you have a shorter more steeply angled bullet and you load it to the wrong length it can drag on the ramp or tilt sharply up. In either case the case will go somewhere else but smoothly into the chamber.
I have long believed that different 1911's will each be a different animal (slide speed and tightness,looseness of slide,spring weights and how the drag on the inside of the gun ? Who knows.) and just because some handload works great in your gun doesn't mean it will work in another 1911.
Keep in mind that a slight change of bullet shape is going to change how and where it contacts the feed ramp if loaded to the same over all length.
Also be aware that if you change the power level of a certain load the overall length might have to be fussed with to get good function.

Short answer is I try to match my loads to a printed load in a manual that has a similar shape and weight bullet but I will test fire to test my load before cranking a pile of them.
NVGdude
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Posted: 10/4/2008 6:44:09 PM
1.220" sounds just about right for a 200 grain SWC.
Seat them much longer and you may have feed issues due to the nose profile on SWC bullets.
teggy1
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Posted: 10/4/2008 7:01:12 PM
[Last Edit: 10/4/2008 7:01:25 PM by teggy1]
my hornady manual says 1.245 for a 200 grn lswc. I am stuffing 200 grn lrnfp right now.
918v
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Posted: 10/4/2008 8:29:49 PM
Do you know what portion of the projectile constitutes the shank? If so, seat the bullet so that the shank is securely held by the case. You want only a smidgeon of the shank sticking out past the case mouth to center the bullet in the chamber throat. I figure you'll end up with a 1.200" OAL.
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teggy1
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Posted: 10/4/2008 11:06:18 PM
[Last Edit: 10/4/2008 11:55:35 PM by teggy1]
Here's a link to the bullets, I am assuming that by shank, you mean were the ogive meets the body(major diameter) of the bullet. These bullets have a groove around what I think is this intersection, almost like a cannelure, if this is the seating depth to be used it will give me a COL of about 1.190. I have read on other forums to just seat so the lube ring is just inside the case, seat so there is about 1/32 of the material forward the lube ring sticking out of the case, some say to seat to 1.190 all the way out to 1.260. Not all apply to this bullet, but also other lrnfp(lead round nose flat point) bullets. I e-mailed missouri bullet company with this question, so maybe they can shed some light on the topic as well. But I know ARFCOM is much more attentive giving timely if not almost instant information, thanks guys! 918v the bullet does look a little more appropriate at 1.200, but it would require alot of crimp to bring the brass back to the bullet, but maybe go to the very top of the top groove?
FAC
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Posted: 10/4/2008 11:16:19 PM
I seat my 200gr SWC to 1.250" and they run 100%. i've found much shorter and that's when you encounter the occasional feeding problem. Just play with it and you'll find what works for your gun.
918v
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Posted: 10/5/2008 12:25:38 AM

Originally Posted By teggy1:
Here's a link to the bullets, I am assuming that by shank, you mean were the ogive meets the body(major diameter) of the bullet. These bullets have a groove around what I think is this intersection, almost like a cannelure, if this is the seating depth to be used it will give me a COL of about 1.190. I have read on other forums to just seat so the lube ring is just inside the case, seat so there is about 1/32 of the material forward the lube ring sticking out of the case, some say to seat to 1.190 all the way out to 1.260. Not all apply to this bullet, but also other lrnfp(lead round nose flat point) bullets. I e-mailed missouri bullet company with this question, so maybe they can shed some light on the topic as well. But I know ARFCOM is much more attentive giving timely if not almost instant information, thanks guys! 918v the bullet does look a little more appropriate at 1.200, but it would require alot of crimp to bring the brass back to the bullet, but maybe go to the very top of the top groove?


or just past the bottom and taper crimp. This bullet does not have much of a shank at all. Be careful how you flare, else you may not have enough case tension on the bullet.
Comet restores soiled cases to like new appearance.
teggy1
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Posted: 10/5/2008 1:18:06 PM
here's the reply from the e-mail I sent to Missouri Bullet company last night(Sat. night)

Hi Jeremy -

I do not have an XD, so cannot speak directly from experience on the topic.

What I would do first is to seat the bullets such that the case mouth
closes on the crimp groove, using only a mild-to-moderate powder charge
in case the shorter OAL increases pressure (this factor is somewhat
dependent upon your powder's burning rate.) If you get satisfactory
results with this in terms of feeding, reliability, and accuracy, stop
right there. If not, start seating the bullet out in increments until
you do.

That's about all I can suggest, and I would appreciate feedback when
you've range-tested the OAL length and loads.

Thanks!

Brad