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45FMJoe
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Posted: 11/2/2009 3:34:07 PM
I am reading how to do this and I've learned you can use regular Manganese Dioxide powder from a pottery store for a dark home brew park, but can I use regular old Zinc Oxide powder (ZnO) the same way for a lighter gray parkerizing?
raf
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Posted: 11/2/2009 4:02:37 PM
Dunno.

I buy the kits from Brownell's, which work well, as long as i do my part.

I've always thought of parking as the first half of a good finish, the second being some sort of epoxy paint (such as Brownell's alumaHyde II) or other similar coating applied over a well-prepped, fresh park finish. The two, together, are nearly indestructible.
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45FMJoe
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Posted: 11/2/2009 4:12:23 PM
[Last Edit: 11/2/2009 4:13:00 PM by 45FMJoe]
Yup, I thought about it... but the Brownell's solution is $50/gallon. I can get Zinc Oxide or Manganese Dioxide powder dirt effing cheap locally. Add Naval Jelly (Phosphoric Acid) and steel wool I already have and done!

chuck17
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Posted: 11/8/2009 6:54:23 PM
The Lauer product is half the price per gallon from Midway. How much Parkerizing do you want to do? The 16 oz. amount will probably do several guns.

http://www.midwayusa.com/BROWSE/BrowseProducts.aspx?pageNum=1&tabId=8&categoryId=11336&categoryString=649***10400***

I have used the Brownells zinc park successfully and gunkoted four guns and a few slides with half of a 16 oz bottle.

Chuck
45FMJoe
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Posted: 11/8/2009 7:18:36 PM
I picked up some Manganese Dioxide and Zinc Oxide powder from a potter supply house. I have some Phosphoric acid in the Kleenstrip Prep and Etch. I also got some steel wool. Can anyone tell me why you add the steel wool?
shootsenmeister
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Posted: 11/9/2009 5:52:35 AM
I do not know about home made Parkerizing but the steel wool is used to age the solution. If you do not use steel wool the parker will only form on the surface of what you are working on and rub off. Once the solution is aged it will penetrate the metal like it is suppose to.
Lakemoor
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Posted: 11/9/2009 1:19:21 PM
Clean the steel wool with a degreaser. I'd use acetone. Also I'd use distilled water as needed. I don't know why the distilled water but I do what I'm generally told to do.

I did this for fun on some rusted up tools. I used some zinc oxide and it came out nice and grey. Remember prep is 95% of the job.
45FMJoe
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Posted: 11/9/2009 1:24:30 PM
Originally Posted By Lakemoor:
Clean the steel wool with a degreaser. I'd use acetone. Also I'd use distilled water as needed. I don't know why the distilled water but I do what I'm generally told to do.

I did this for fun on some rusted up tools. I used some zinc oxide and it came out nice and grey. Remember prep is 95% of the job.


Sweet, thanks! Now do you completely dissolve the steel wool, or???
Lakemoor
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Posted: 11/9/2009 1:32:21 PM
[Last Edit: 11/9/2009 1:37:04 PM by Lakemoor]
You keep it going until the steel wool is completely gone. If needed add more. Get a glass thermometer. I borrowed the wife's. Use a stainless pot or if you have an enamel pot.

I'd do a test run on something before you go all out. Good luck

edit: check out Gaspian's home brew parking on his 1911. go down and you can't miss it
http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=5&f=49&t=70569&page=6
45FMJoe
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Posted: 11/9/2009 1:42:56 PM
Originally Posted By Lakemoor:
You keep it going until the steel wool is completely gone. If needed add more. Get a glass thermometer. I borrowed the wife's. Use a stainless pot or if you have an enamel pot.

I'd do a test run on something before you go all out. Good luck

edit: check out Gaspian's home brew parking on his 1911. go down and you can't miss it
http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=5&f=49&t=70569&page=6


Yup, I was planning on doing some washers or something first and maybe a pair of pliers or something.

So you add steel wool until it stops dissolving? I remember gaspain's thread but he didn't use any steel wool.
Lakemoor
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Posted: 11/9/2009 1:58:18 PM
You put a biscuit in solution and the acid will eat it up or until it gets saturated with it. Don't know why Gaspian didn't use steel wool. He was using it more for a base so maybe not so concerned with a more thicker park? No idea
45FMJoe
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Posted: 11/9/2009 2:02:19 PM
That's what I've read. I guess I'll do one biscuit of steel wool per gallon of distilled water.