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Posted: 1/28/2017 8:05:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/24/2017 6:43:26 PM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 10:51:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2017 4:00:10 PM EDT by KayakSteve]
Great idea for a thread and nice set-up Vic!

It will be nice to share ideas about how to get the most out of NV astronomy.

Dual NV Mount

This is one of the ways that I set up for NV. The SCT gives high mag narrow FOV and the little frac is ultra wide FOV.

Sorry for the link, I can't embed photos.
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 11:02:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2017 11:15:39 AM EDT by KayakSteve]
I just started using this set-up. It's an NVD Micro mounted on a mini ball head attached via a Picatinny rail to the main finder. It makes finding faint emission nebulae in the main scope much easier and provides a great FOV.

NVD Micro as Finder
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 11:54:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TNVC:
There has been a lot of interests lately with using NV with telescopes. We amateur astronomers are always fighting for light while peering into deep sky objects and using a NVD makes hunting for the deep spiral galaxies, nebual, etc a whole lot easier. We have some new NV adapters we have been working with one of THE most brilliant amateur astronomers Al Nagler founder and owner of Tele Vue.

Feel free to post your pics and setups, as so many have some great DIY's out there. Below, my setup as I get ready to peer into some blackness tonight.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v621/Clutch99/20170128_154848_zps1pee8nvq.jpg
View Quote

Nice! Looking forward to some pictures through that setup.
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 12:19:15 PM EDT
I will never forget the night I watched a totally insane meteor shower for about 3 hours with a couple of perfect TNV/PVS14's. There was no moon and I was in the middle of nowhere on a mountain top so there was 0 ambient light.

It was like world war 3 had started and the entire cast of star wars had shown up to participate.
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 12:59:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 1:01:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2017 1:01:43 PM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 3:19:17 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cchurchi:
I will never forget the night I watched a totally insane meteor shower for about 3 hours with a couple of perfect TNV/PVS14's. There was no moon and I was in the middle of nowhere on a mountain top so there was 0 ambient light.

It was like world war 3 had started and the entire cast of star wars had shown up to participate.
View Quote



Nice! That is definitely one of those moments that you remember for the rest of your life.
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 4:08:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2017 4:10:21 PM EDT by KayakSteve]
Here's another of my favorite setups. It's an 8X Newcon Optik catadioptric lens with a gold or goldish plated mirror.

I figured out a way to use 1.25" astronomy filters with it and it's amazing on nebulae, clusters, and larger galaxies.

Newcon Optik 8X

The insert image link doesn't work for me. It gives me a "?"
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 5:16:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 6:22:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2017 6:23:10 PM EDT by KayakSteve]
"Hmmm, then just copy the IMG link and paste it direct like I did below. What filters have you found work well with NV? I would be curious to hear what you tried with green phosphor?"


This is the list of filters that I have tried in order of their usefulness and application;

Lumicon Night Sky Hydrogen Alpha filter-General light pollution filter for galaxies, clusters, and the Milky Way.

Optolong Night Sky Hydrogen Alpha CCD Filter-Same performance as the Lumicon

12nm Hydrogen Alpha filter-All hydrogen emission nebulae such as M42, Barnard's Loop, M16, M17, M20, the Rosette, etc.

7nm Hydrogen Alpha filter-Same as 12nm with higher contrast but more scintillation "noise" due to photocathode being starved of photons.

4.5nm Hydrogen Alpha filter-Same as 12 and 7nm filters but with ultra high contrast with even more "noise."

35nm Hydrogen Alpha filter-Hydrogen emission nebulae with much lower contrast but higher light throughput than the other narrow band filters.

I never observe without some kind of filter even on the best nights in the darkest skies available to me in my NJ Shore location.

The filters work with Green and White Gen 3 and in my XR5 Onyx but the XR5 does not offer the same performance on nebulae that the Gen 3 tubes provide. Close but no cigar.
Link Posted: 1/29/2017 6:32:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2017 6:38:00 PM EDT by KayakSteve]
I forgot to add that visual filters like H-Beta, OIII, visual light pollution reduction, etc. do nothing to enhance NV views.
Link Posted: 1/30/2017 10:01:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/30/2017 10:01:53 AM EDT by KayakSteve]
PVS-7 Video

I shot this 1/28/17 with a Canon DSLR attached to a PVS-7 that was inserted into a 150mm f5 refractor.
Link Posted: 1/30/2017 12:44:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/30/2017 12:45:45 PM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 1/30/2017 1:19:39 PM EDT
I took this overexposed shot by holding a DSLR with a 60mm macro lens up to the eyepiece of a PVS-7 with a Photonis XR5 Onyx tube.

The scope was a Vixen 102EDSS refractor.

XR5 Onyx Orion Nebula

Vic, I have too many NODs already but I think I have to talk you about an L3 filmless.
Link Posted: 1/30/2017 1:46:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/30/2017 3:04:42 PM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 1/30/2017 2:43:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/30/2017 3:14:37 PM EDT
Really good stuff Vic!

I haven't seen too many photos that come close to replicating the actual eyepiece view.

One guy that goes by JDB_Astro on Youtube has published a few processed photos that are very close to what the eyeball actually sees as opposed to the camera.

I've thought about trying the stacking technique to process photos but this NOD astronomy is too new to me and I can't tear myself away from the views long enough to do any serious photography.
Link Posted: 1/31/2017 3:36:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/31/2017 3:42:17 PM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 1/31/2017 3:53:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/31/2017 4:02:34 PM EDT by KayakSteve]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TNVC:


Have you tried both techniques? Direct through the tele tube NV (I guess with a Barlow of some sort to get the magnification) vs. a NVD, piggybacked off the telescope eye piece? I've heard some say a bit too much noise going the piggyback technique, but I see splendid results piggybacking with the PVS-14 with both the Tele View 40mm Plossl and the 21mm ETHOS (but limited FOV with that one due to eye relief and some vignetting), but the Plossl is a beauty with the piggybacking.

Gonna try a MOD-3 tomorrow night direct through the tube but this time with green filmed for both (PVS-14 as well) I do not have many 82LP/38.2 Signal to noise units laying around. A lot of low EBI stuff, just not the ultra high specs of this L3 WPT tube I have. Most WPT we have are in the 34-37 S/N and .8 and below EBI's. I want to see what apparent "noise" differences I see between both setups with the same tubes. Need to compare apples to apples here myself.

Edit, also going to run the piggybacking with the 40mm Plossl with a Tele View 2x Barlow and the PVS-14 as well.
View Quote


I've tried afocal, NOD held in place over an eyepiece, but I prefer the NOD with a C-mount to 1.25" tube in the diagonal with or without a barlow.

The narrow band Hydrogen-Alpha filters that I use to observe nebulae limit light throughput to such an extent that you have quite a bit of noise that only increases with focal ratio.

My favorite scope for nebulae viewing is a 150mm f5 refractor. Globular clusters and galaxies are better in my 8" SCT even though it's f10.

The TeleVue refractors are excellent for NOD astronomy due to their excellent optics and relatively short focal lengths.
Link Posted: 1/31/2017 8:32:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/31/2017 8:35:31 PM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 1/31/2017 9:08:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/31/2017 9:17:56 PM EDT by KayakSteve]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TNVC:


Since I have not tried anything but my 2800mm (f/10) Celestron C11 SCT, not sure going straight through the tube will show me any noticeable difference with the NVD? Have your tried both ways in your 8" SCT? Learning here what you see the different viewing experience between the two? I've read from others the like the non-Afocal but not really read the why's?

Also can you link the best Hydrogen-Alpha's filters you've used? I've used some of the other Orion O2 stuff in the past with good results. How does this ONE rate?
View Quote


I have tried afocal with the SCT and I found it to be okay for small targets like galaxies and globular clusters but I normally just insert the NOD into a barlow before placing it in the diagonal for more magnification.

The reasons that I go straight into a diagonal are no vignetting, least amount of glass for highest possible light throughput, widest FOV possible, and ease of use.

I cobbled together a way to go afocal but a well engineered dedicated adapter would be far more useful for the times that you want go through an eyepiece.

That Orion filter has gotten good reviews from at least one guy on Cloudy Nights.

I highly recommend a narrow band, 12nm or narrower, Hydrogen Alpha filter for anyone who wants to stargaze with a NOD. There are countless nebulae that can only be seen with these filters and on a clear dark night the views can be surreal.

The following are all filters that I routinely use. I just picked up my second 4.5nm filter. The 4.5nm with a 3X magnifier is beyond description, it really is one of those seeing is believing things.

4.5nm Hydrogen Alpha filter

Light Pollution Filter

Light Pollution filter

12nm Hydrogen Alpha filter
Link Posted: 1/31/2017 9:25:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/31/2017 9:25:58 PM EDT by KayakSteve]
Vic,

You could pick up an 80mm f5 refractor to mount on top of your SCT. You could put a C-mount monocular or C-mount equipped PVS-7 into a diagonal and have ULTRA wide fields to compliment the narrow FOV of the Schmidt.

scroll down to see the set up
Link Posted: 1/31/2017 9:37:12 PM EDT
Anyone have any Andromeda pics or vids?
Link Posted: 1/31/2017 10:47:20 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cchurchi:
Anyone have any Andromeda pics or vids?
View Quote


This guy, jdb_astro, posts some great stuff. The photos that I have taken of M31 are too crummy to post!

Andromeda Galaxy (M31)
Link Posted: 2/1/2017 7:17:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2017 7:25:18 PM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 2/1/2017 7:56:49 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TNVC:


Interesting, I like.

Going out tonight to test out some green filmed with both behind the 40mm Plossl and the Mod-3 directly into the scope with a 2x barlow. Moon is out earlier tonight, so that stinks so may be out late when it sets.

So did you see any difference with the piggyback NVD behind the EP with your f/10 SCT vs. through the tube direct? I am not using the 6.3 reducer just yet, I want to look at both techniques. I am guessing the noise will be the same with such a large focal length with both techniques.

So far I am liking the Tele Vue 40mm Plossl with virtually no vignetting and getting the full 50deg FOV due to the adapter design hitting the sweet spot of the Plossl, exit pupil and eye relief. With my 21mm ETHOS pic above, you can see the vignetting and of course, I am at 70deg FOV vs the colossal 100deg with real eye viewing.
View Quote


I have mostly used the straight through technique with all of my scopes sometimes with a 2X barlow.

The key to using the afocal method is a sturdy way to hold the NVD over the eyepiece. Just handholding it is difficult at best.

I do like the afocal method when observing certain objects, planetary nebulae and globular clusters are prime targets for high power.

If you have not used a night vision/telescope combo to look at a decent globular cluster like M15, M2, or M13 you have not lived! They resolve to their cores in a 4" refractor.

I have found that the two largest factors for night vision astronomy are sky transparency and good Hydrogen Alpha filters. A transparent, dark night with good filters and an NVD is a visual astronomer's dream come true.

I don't want anyone to think that a telescope is necessary to stargaze with an NVD. I actually enjoy 1X and 3X immensely and I always have an NVD set up like that even when I have the scope out too. The scope just lets you see smaller objects and increases detail in some of the larger objects.
Link Posted: 2/2/2017 1:44:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2017 1:49:21 AM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 2/2/2017 8:03:07 AM EDT
"Tonight was a bust with too much darn haze and cloudiness...Front moving in. "

That's why I fish too!
Link Posted: 2/7/2017 12:27:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/3/2017 4:43:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/3/2017 6:56:50 PM EDT
What a cool thread. I can't wait to try with my TNV L3 film-less WPs.
Link Posted: 3/4/2017 12:44:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/4/2017 1:29:02 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TNVC:


Besides the obvious gunplay with NODS, the sky is an amazing treat many overlook. You will enjoy immensely.
View Quote

... but in the event that someone needs a practical application for looking at the stars with NVD because they're too busy being serious to have a good time, I posit this:

Many stars will reveal themselves under I2 making navigation by starlight more practical under less than ideal weather conditions. There are limits, of course, but some minimal mastery of the stars is good insurance against failure of electronic navigation systems.

Beyond being a ninja tool, NVDs will provide an abundant amount of information about our environment that you will never notice until you unwind and have a good time. When I am being serious, I look right through the NVD like it's not even there - but I didn't get to that point of relaxation by being uptight under I2 every moment I'm using it.
Link Posted: 3/8/2017 11:33:24 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TNVC:
Pic taken from last weeks winter Star Party in the Florida keys using our TNV-14 L3 Filmless from a users 32 inch scope. Hope to show the incredible video from this scope.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v621/Clutch99/Neb_zpsrrfoujnl.jpg
View Quote


I would have loved a view through that setup!

The Orion Nebula is a good test to determine whether or not you're going to be into astronomy. If you are not blown away by M42 in an NVD astronomy is definitely not a hobby you should pursue.
Link Posted: 3/11/2017 10:13:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/12/2017 12:04:48 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KayakSteve:
PVS-7 Video

I shot this 1/28/17 with a Canon DSLR attached to a PVS-7 that was inserted into a 150mm f5 refractor.
View Quote


Incredible.
Link Posted: 3/12/2017 12:08:36 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TNVC:
Here is my report and pics of Orion from a few nights back.

Sky Conditions
- Very transparent, but a lot of turbulence due to a storm that just passed a few days earlier.
- City sky glow

Location
- Southern Kalifornia
- Elevation at location, 2100ft.
- Temp - 52deg F
- Humidity - 20%
- Time of Night - 2130hrs

Equipment Used
- Celestron C11 CPC Series
- 11" (279mm) Aperture
- Focal Length - 2800 f/10 ***1764mm f/6.3 reducer not used in this session***
- Alignment Method - 2 Star
- 40mm Tele Vue Plossl (1.25" adapter used with Tele Vue 2" Star Diagonal)
- 21mm Tele Vue ETHOS
- Tele Vue Proto PVS-14 Objective Lens Adapter
- TNV-14 installed with L3 Mil Spec Omni 8 White Phosphor Filmless
- 38.2 S/N
- 82LP
- .8 EBI
- 2563 Photocathode
- Galaxy S7 Edge on-board camera
- Tele Vue FoneMate

No narrow band H-a filters were used in these shots below of M42 Orion Nebula. The views below are in no way represented on how good the native eye through the eyepiece looked. It was stunning. No special doctoring of the photo's where attempted, nor any photoshop work. These are the raw images from the Galaxy S7. The gain was turned down on the 21mm ETHOS pics to mitigate some scintillation. The 40mm Plossl, the gain was full up and a bit nosier as you can see.

40mm Tele Vue Plossl
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v621/Clutch99/40mm%20Plossl_zpshurrc3ie.jpg

21mm Tele Vue ETHOS
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v621/Clutch99/21mm%20Ethos_zps4dwzvx3z.jpg
View Quote


Stunning.

You guys kill me. I see this stuff and have to run out and buy it. And I assume it's probably at least ten grand. And I'll use it twice a year lol.
Link Posted: 3/12/2017 10:59:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2017 11:03:42 AM EDT by KayakSteve]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NothingClever:


Stunning.

You guys kill me. I see this stuff and have to run out and buy it. And I assume it's probably at least ten grand. And I'll use it twice a year lol.
View Quote


A telescope is nice to have but night vision astronomy is geared toward seeing really faint or normally invisible objects. Many nebulae are far too large to be appreciated in a telescope and really shine at 1X to 3X. It's also mind blowing just to look up and see tens of thousands of stars on a clear and moonless night!

The minimum requirements to get into NVD astronomy is a decent Gen 3 device, no need for the ultra high end stuff, a few filters that go in front of the optics, and an auxiliary lens like a 3X. Some NVDs, a PVS-7 for example, can be easily adapted for use with camera lenses.

The scope in the link is a great candidate for NVD astronomy that will also be useful for "normal" astronomy. It will be great for solar system objects like the rings of Saturn and close up views of lunar craters. You can go less expensive too but this scope comes on a "Go To" mount that will let you tour the sky without having to use star charts and a finder scope.

NVD Scope
Link Posted: 3/17/2017 5:23:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/11/2017 6:10:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/11/2017 6:10:36 PM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 4/11/2017 6:42:19 PM EDT
Televue is legendary and I am glad you are working with Mr Nagler as I have no doubt epicness will be the result.
I am going to call you guys tomorrow and order a PVS-14...can't wait to work with you over the phone.

The only telescope I own is my Leica APO Televid 77 which is actually a fantastic spotting scope and a decent refractor for casual sky use.
My Leica 10x50's and 8X42's are also fantastic for viewing meteor showers...but my old ITT 45LPM res anvis tube rig picks up weird stuff
that is otherwise invisible.

Gen 3 is fun!!!
Link Posted: 4/25/2017 5:48:22 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/3/2017 11:20:36 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/7/2017 4:52:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/24/2017 6:08:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/24/2017 6:12:24 PM EDT by TNVC]
Link Posted: 7/29/2017 8:57:20 PM EDT
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