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Basic
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Posted: 7/11/2012 4:01:59 AM EST
Why doesn't Glock just add a couple ounces to the frame and import these.
If i remember correctly, that's all they need to do to pass the importation points list.
Discuss. Good seller? No market? Or they just want to concentrate on screwing up the 17 and 22?

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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 4:14:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/11/2012 4:16:07 AM EST by RDTCU]
Well, the market is saturated with small, light, blowback-operated .380's. If you're going to buy a gun as large as the 25, you might as well pick up a 19 and have about the same recoil and cheaper, more effective ammo. The primary reason the 25/28 were developed was to provide a quality handgun for potential customers in areas that don't allow civilian weapons in military calibers.

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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 4:24:45 AM EST
Market may be saturated, but with most of them priced really high that sometimes work or cheaper and don't work for crap.

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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 4:41:31 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/11/2012 4:41:57 AM EST by RDTCU]
Most likely Glock just doesn't think that many people, given the option, would choose enough 25's over 19's to be economically feasible. "Adding a few ounces" would require new or modified production lines. A lead weight shoved in the grip isn't going to cut it. Even if it did allow it to pass import requirements, Glock wouldn't let themselves do that.

My guess is that they assume that American customers will take the cheaper, more abundant, more effective ammo in the same size package with basically the same recoil, because we have that option.

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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 4:44:19 AM EST
Originally Posted By RDTCU:
Most likely Glock just doesn't think that many people, given the option, would choose enough 25's over 19's to be economically feasible. "Adding a few ounces" would require new or modified production lines. A lead weight shoved in the grip isn't going to cut it. Even if it did allow it to pass import requirements, Glock wouldn't let themselves do that.

My guess is that they assume that American customers will take the cheaper, more abundant, more effective ammo in the same size package with basically the same recoil, because we have that option.


Agreed.
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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 4:52:13 AM EST
That's a good point.
I don't own any Glocks but i thought the .380 market being so hot the past
few years would have driven them to find a way to import and sell in the US.

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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 5:15:27 AM EST
Most likely Glock just doesn't think that many people, given the option, would choose enough 25's over 19's to be economically feasible.

Exactly. Why would anyone carry a .380 when they can carry the 9mm or .40 in the same size gun? Makes no sense to me.
.380 sucks anyway. They can keep them overseas.

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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 5:42:31 AM EST
They could legally import the uppers. They just choose not to. The uppers fit on a G26 frame.

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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 5:47:24 AM EST
I know of a few here, bought by an LE agency as bugs, years later the officers got a purchase option as they retired the pistols and a couple got sold by the officers. LE agency purchasing agents are stoooopid.
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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 1:11:38 PM EST
As was said above, the .380 guns are exactly the same size as the 9mm guns, with exactly the same magazine capacity, so what would be the point? A much poorer performing round in a gun that is the same size and magazine capacity, not to mention much more expensive ammo? Not going to happen, I don't think. About the only selling point would be if someone wanted one to complete a collection, but I imagine demand would be so low that Glock wouldn't ever even think about producing them here for that. IIRC, I seem to remember being told by the instructor at an armorer's class, when someone asked about the .380 guns, that they were primarily produced for sale in countries where 9mm or larger calibers were forbidden for civilian ownership. I could be wrong about that, but that's what I seem to remember, anyway.

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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 1:16:57 PM EST
Originally Posted By bub75:
IIRC, I seem to remember being told by the instructor at an armorer's class, when someone asked about the .380 guns, that they were primarily produced for sale in countries where 9mm or larger calibers were forbidden for civilian ownership. I could be wrong about that, but that's what I seem to remember, anyway.

Bub75


Some countries restrict civilian firearms to non-military-use calibers, for who knows what reasons. That means that things like 9mm, 40SW, 45ACP, 5.56, 5.45, 7.62(x39,51,54) etc

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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 7:20:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By RDTCU:
Originally Posted By bub75:
IIRC, I seem to remember being told by the instructor at an armorer's class, when someone asked about the .380 guns, that they were primarily produced for sale in countries where 9mm or larger calibers were forbidden for civilian ownership. I could be wrong about that, but that's what I seem to remember, anyway.

Bub75


Some countries restrict civilian firearms to non-military-use calibers, for who knows what reasons. That means that things like 9mm, 40SW, 45ACP, 5.56, 5.45, 7.62(x39,51,54) etc


Mexico does that iirc. Fat lot of good it does.
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Link Posted: 7/11/2012 9:42:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/11/2012 9:42:37 PM EST by Quiet_Wolf]
Originally Posted By Dan_Gray:
Originally Posted By RDTCU:
Originally Posted By bub75:
IIRC, I seem to remember being told by the instructor at an armorer's class, when someone asked about the .380 guns, that they were primarily produced for sale in countries where 9mm or larger calibers were forbidden for civilian ownership. I could be wrong about that, but that's what I seem to remember, anyway.

Bub75


Some countries restrict civilian firearms to non-military-use calibers, for who knows what reasons. That means that things like 9mm, 40SW, 45ACP, 5.56, 5.45, 7.62(x39,51,54) etc


Mexico does that iirc. Fat lot of good it does.


Most Central American and South American countries do it. Along with some European countries.

It's to ensure that the Government always has better arms than the people.

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