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johns961
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Posted: 3/22/2010 4:34:17 PM
I carry a little bottle with the pin point applicator filled with mobil 1 in my range bag.
I use it once in a while in extended sessions. It works.

John!
colklink
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Posted: 3/22/2010 5:48:16 PM
Mobil 1 is about all I use anymore to lube all my guns. No problems. In fact I have noticed that my ciener .22 adaptor runs longer without problems when using the Mobil 1 over breakfree. I still use breakfree for cleaning and long term storage, but Mobil 1 for lube.
sj586
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Posted: 3/26/2010 9:25:41 PM
What is so special about Mobil 1 motor oil? If the logic behind using Mobil 1 is that it is cheaper than a CLP and that an oil designed to be used in an internal combustion engine must be better and over-engineered for a lowly firearm, then even the cheapest no-name brand of motor oil meets those goals even better than Mobil 1. Mobil 1 is ~$6 a quart. Walmart oil is ~$2 a quart. They both meet the same SAE specs.
ElPresidenteAnRK
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Posted: 3/27/2010 3:56:29 PM
well at least in the auto world the difference is a lot of the cleaning additives in the oil, and the Synthetic oil the molecules are smaller than in the conventional oil. but as it pertains to lubricity of a firearm i am not sure.
Meplat
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Posted: 3/30/2010 12:08:05 AM
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
How about putting CLP in the engine of whatever your drive?
/quote]

A bit off topic, but I know someone who did that with a small Honda car, at Misawa AB.
It ran really well ,for a while. Idle was always unusually high.

I always wondered if the CLP killed it, or the large number of previous owners and the sheer lack of prior PM of any kind.
Unicorn
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Posted: 3/30/2010 1:24:35 AM
Originally Posted By sj586:
What is so special about Mobil 1 motor oil? If the logic behind using Mobil 1 is that it is cheaper than a CLP and that an oil designed to be used in an internal combustion engine must be better and over-engineered for a lowly firearm, then even the cheapest no-name brand of motor oil meets those goals even better than Mobil 1. Mobil 1 is ~$6 a quart. Walmart oil is ~$2 a quart. They both meet the same SAE specs.


The SAE specs are the minimum that an oil has to meet. Mobil 1 is almost the gold standard when it comes to oils, even in the automotive world! Check out some of the car forums and Mobil 1 is among the very top rated oils. Synthetics generally perform better than dino, and some have different amounts of EP additives, and detergents in their additive package. A good auto oil does more than lube. It's designed to also clean a little, and to hold dirt particles in suspension until they can be filtered out instead of deposition them on crankshafts, cylinder walls, etc. It's probably why some people have an easier time cleaning their guns, or their guns go longer with any engine oil.

I don't use engine oil in my guns, but in a pinch I would, and I'm sure it would still be better than any of the household lubes like Tri-Flow, WD-40, all the general purpose lubes, and even some gun lubes that are essentially just mineral oil. Because of the shape and the way components move against each other I wonder if a higher amount of EP additives would be better. They don't really get warmed up and in a consistent motion like crankshafts do, so there might not be the fluid film lubrication that happens in an engine. So the extra EP additives in engine oil might reduce the friction of the parts rubbing together quite a bit. When you first start your car, before the oil is flowing you are relying on the boundry film that was left behind by the oil, and when you floor it and the engine revs higher the pressures increase in most moving parts so that you again are relying on boundry film lube. Fluid film is when the parts are never touching, and basically floating on the film of lube that is between them.
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baxsom
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Posted: 3/30/2010 5:44:56 AM
im not sure about this whole mobil 1 thing being the beat all end all.
i mean do a search for mobil 1 at www.corvetteforum.com and you will find a lot (a whole in fact) of people that wont put it in their lawnmower.
there are more glowing reviews for mobil 1 at a rifle site than a performance car one. wierd
THUNDERKISS
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Posted: 3/30/2010 12:21:35 PM
If anyone does not prefer Mobil 1, there are other options available:

Synthetic Motor Oils as Small Arms Lubricants

Cz357
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Posted: 3/30/2010 8:36:06 PM
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
How about putting CLP in the engine of whatever your drive?

A bit off topic, but I know someone who did that with a small Honda car, at Misawa AB.
It ran really well ,for a while. Idle was always unusually high.

I always wondered if the CLP killed it, or the large number of previous owners and the sheer lack of prior PM of any kind.


I'd assume it idled higher since CLP is much thinner than regular oil, more than likely the CLP killed it. Interestingly, newer cars also have their recommended oil weight lighter as well, since a lighter oil will create less drag and thus allow them to post better MPG #s.

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Originally Posted By Meplat:
[
Originally Posted By sj586:
What is so special about Mobil 1 motor oil? If the logic behind using Mobil 1 is that it is cheaper than a CLP and that an oil designed to be used in an internal combustion engine must be better and over-engineered for a lowly firearm, then even the cheapest no-name brand of motor oil meets those goals even better than Mobil 1. Mobil 1 is ~$6 a quart. Walmart oil is ~$2 a quart. They both meet the same SAE specs.


The SAE specs are the minimum that an oil has to meet. Mobil 1 is almost the gold standard when it comes to oils, even in the automotive world! Check out some of the car forums and Mobil 1 is among the very top rated oils. Synthetics generally perform better than dino, and some have different amounts of EP additives, and detergents in their additive package. A good auto oil does more than lube. It's designed to also clean a little, and to hold dirt particles in suspension until they can be filtered out instead of deposition them on crankshafts, cylinder walls, etc. It's probably why some people have an easier time cleaning their guns, or their guns go longer with any engine oil.

I don't use engine oil in my guns, but in a pinch I would, and I'm sure it would still be better than any of the household lubes like Tri-Flow, WD-40, all the general purpose lubes, and even some gun lubes that are essentially just mineral oil. Because of the shape and the way components move against each other I wonder if a higher amount of EP additives would be better. They don't really get warmed up and in a consistent motion like crankshafts do, so there might not be the fluid film lubrication that happens in an engine. So the extra EP additives in engine oil might reduce the friction of the parts rubbing together quite a bit. When you first start your car, before the oil is flowing you are relying on the boundry film that was left behind by the oil, and when you floor it and the engine revs higher the pressures increase in most moving parts so that you again are relying on boundry film lube. Fluid film is when the parts are never touching, and basically floating on the film of lube that is between them.


Mobil 1 is considered the "gold standard" because of advertising and general consumer ignorance about the product. I've already pointed this out several times before, but the current Mobil 1 you can find on shelves is not a synthetic oil, it's a very well refined dino oil. That's not to say it's a bad oil, it's just that it is not synthetic.
Some true synthetic oils using PAO and Esters as their base would be Royal Purple, Amsoil, German Castrol, and Redline oil.
0612Devil
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Posted: 3/30/2010 9:22:46 PM
All the naysayers need to try Mobil 1 and compare it to CLP. I bet it lubes better, and lasts longer than CLP. If not, your rifle won't blow up and you're out 7 bucks. Yay...
Pack a pillow and blanket. Go. See the world. You will never regret it...
ElPresidenteAnRK
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Posted: 3/30/2010 9:49:08 PM

Originally Posted By Cz357:
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
How about putting CLP in the engine of whatever your drive?

A bit off topic, but I know someone who did that with a small Honda car, at Misawa AB.
It ran really well ,for a while. Idle was always unusually high.

I always wondered if the CLP killed it, or the large number of previous owners and the sheer lack of prior PM of any kind.


I'd assume it idled higher since CLP is much thinner than regular oil, more than likely the CLP killed it. Interestingly, newer cars also have their recommended oil weight lighter as well, since a lighter oil will create less drag and thus allow them to post better MPG #s.

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Originally Posted By Meplat:
[
Originally Posted By sj586:
What is so special about Mobil 1 motor oil? If the logic behind using Mobil 1 is that it is cheaper than a CLP and that an oil designed to be used in an internal combustion engine must be better and over-engineered for a lowly firearm, then even the cheapest no-name brand of motor oil meets those goals even better than Mobil 1. Mobil 1 is ~$6 a quart. Walmart oil is ~$2 a quart. They both meet the same SAE specs.


The SAE specs are the minimum that an oil has to meet. Mobil 1 is almost the gold standard when it comes to oils, even in the automotive world! Check out some of the car forums and Mobil 1 is among the very top rated oils. Synthetics generally perform better than dino, and some have different amounts of EP additives, and detergents in their additive package. A good auto oil does more than lube. It's designed to also clean a little, and to hold dirt particles in suspension until they can be filtered out instead of deposition them on crankshafts, cylinder walls, etc. It's probably why some people have an easier time cleaning their guns, or their guns go longer with any engine oil.

I don't use engine oil in my guns, but in a pinch I would, and I'm sure it would still be better than any of the household lubes like Tri-Flow, WD-40, all the general purpose lubes, and even some gun lubes that are essentially just mineral oil. Because of the shape and the way components move against each other I wonder if a higher amount of EP additives would be better. They don't really get warmed up and in a consistent motion like crankshafts do, so there might not be the fluid film lubrication that happens in an engine. So the extra EP additives in engine oil might reduce the friction of the parts rubbing together quite a bit. When you first start your car, before the oil is flowing you are relying on the boundry film that was left behind by the oil, and when you floor it and the engine revs higher the pressures increase in most moving parts so that you again are relying on boundry film lube. Fluid film is when the parts are never touching, and basically floating on the film of lube that is between them.


Mobil 1 is considered the "gold standard" because of advertising and general consumer ignorance about the product. I've already pointed this out several times before, but the current Mobil 1 you can find on shelves is not a synthetic oil, it's a very well refined dino oil. That's not to say it's a bad oil, it's just that it is not synthetic.
Some true synthetic oils using PAO and Esters as their base would be Royal Purple, Amsoil, German Castrol, and Redline oil.
+1 you can also tell the real synthetics as they are like 8 to 10 bucks a quart

Unicorn
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Posted: 3/30/2010 11:10:17 PM
Originally Posted By Cz357:
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
How about putting CLP in the engine of whatever your drive?

A bit off topic, but I know someone who did that with a small Honda car, at Misawa AB.
It ran really well ,for a while. Idle was always unusually high.

I always wondered if the CLP killed it, or the large number of previous owners and the sheer lack of prior PM of any kind.


I'd assume it idled higher since CLP is much thinner than regular oil, more than likely the CLP killed it. Interestingly, newer cars also have their recommended oil weight lighter as well, since a lighter oil will create less drag and thus allow them to post better MPG #s.

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Originally Posted By Meplat:
[
Originally Posted By sj586:
What is so special about Mobil 1 motor oil? If the logic behind using Mobil 1 is that it is cheaper than a CLP and that an oil designed to be used in an internal combustion engine must be better and over-engineered for a lowly firearm, then even the cheapest no-name brand of motor oil meets those goals even better than Mobil 1. Mobil 1 is ~$6 a quart. Walmart oil is ~$2 a quart. They both meet the same SAE specs.


The SAE specs are the minimum that an oil has to meet. Mobil 1 is almost the gold standard when it comes to oils, even in the automotive world! Check out some of the car forums and Mobil 1 is among the very top rated oils. Synthetics generally perform better than dino, and some have different amounts of EP additives, and detergents in their additive package. A good auto oil does more than lube. It's designed to also clean a little, and to hold dirt particles in suspension until they can be filtered out instead of deposition them on crankshafts, cylinder walls, etc. It's probably why some people have an easier time cleaning their guns, or their guns go longer with any engine oil.

I don't use engine oil in my guns, but in a pinch I would, and I'm sure it would still be better than any of the household lubes like Tri-Flow, WD-40, all the general purpose lubes, and even some gun lubes that are essentially just mineral oil. Because of the shape and the way components move against each other I wonder if a higher amount of EP additives would be better. They don't really get warmed up and in a consistent motion like crankshafts do, so there might not be the fluid film lubrication that happens in an engine. So the extra EP additives in engine oil might reduce the friction of the parts rubbing together quite a bit. When you first start your car, before the oil is flowing you are relying on the boundry film that was left behind by the oil, and when you floor it and the engine revs higher the pressures increase in most moving parts so that you again are relying on boundry film lube. Fluid film is when the parts are never touching, and basically floating on the film of lube that is between them.


Mobil 1 is considered the "gold standard" because of advertising and general consumer ignorance about the product. I've already pointed this out several times before, but the current Mobil 1 you can find on shelves is not a synthetic oil, it's a very well refined dino oil. That's not to say it's a bad oil, it's just that it is not synthetic.
Some true synthetic oils using PAO and Esters as their base would be Royal Purple, Amsoil, German Castrol, and Redline oil.


I was leaving out the less common types of oils since most people have never heard of them, and would have a harder time getting them than most any gun oil. I also have to admit that I haven't looked at Mobile 1 in a while. My preference actually is the German Castrol when I can find it. Even though I only have a "two point slow," it makes me feel better to run an actual Euro specced oil in it.
Store hours 10AM to 6PM Tue-Sat Ph: 253-722-1966
www.surplusammoandarms.com
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JDF
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Posted: 3/30/2010 11:48:31 PM
Motor oil is made to endure 5000 miles and 5000 rpm. CLP and most gun lubes are too thin. I think motor oil would hold up to 5000 rounds better than most "gun lube".
snowman03782
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Posted: 4/19/2010 10:12:36 PM
[Last Edit: 4/19/2010 10:15:26 PM by snowman03782]


I would be willing to bet the clp got burned off by the engine. using CLP as lower viscosity oil in a car engine will be swept up along the cylinder walls much quicker than a normal viscosity oil intended. getting light oil up in the combustion chamber probably explains a higher idle rpm. fuel injection or carb was trying for idle setting but had no control over the idle...... the clp all or most got burned up and she ran dry!!?

i wouldnt dare comment on CLP vs M1, its hard enough to sway the syn vs dino argument in the auto world.

GTO_Kroh
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Posted: 4/20/2010 10:55:41 PM
I use amsoil myself.......but thats what I run in my car also
Harv24
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Posted: 4/21/2010 10:46:25 PM
Wow... lots of dick measuring in this forum... a tad bit unusual...

I don't understand why folks get there undies in a bunch if your not using Lube "A" or "B"

I learned a long time ago that the type of lube is no where near as important as where you lube and with how much and how often..

You want in on a little secret......brace yourself........ The BEST lube EVER..........































Is free.......... there, now you know....
crashland73
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Posted: 4/25/2010 12:19:13 AM
[Last Edit: 4/25/2010 12:21:45 AM by crashland73]
I use mobil 1 synthetic on all my firearms. I even put my ar15 in the deepfreeze to test it and it functioned great lol! if it can keep a corvette's engine running at high rpm then my ar will work with it. i have been using it for years. i am going to get some mobil 1 synthetic grease for other firearms of mine that need grease instead of just oil. but to be honest, i would think that any synthetic would be good. i know regular oil or even some gun oils, in cold or i mean VERY severe cold can lock a rifle or pistol up.
crashland73
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Posted: 4/25/2010 12:20:29 AM
good stuff too!

Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
I use amsoil myself.......but thats what I run in my car also


eternal24k
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Posted: 4/25/2010 11:10:46 PM
[Last Edit: 4/26/2010 7:48:08 AM by eternal24k]
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
If you purchased a rifle, run what the manufactuer recommends.


Say goodbye to reloads and steel cased ammo. I use what I have and what works for me, many companies just endorse what they have a hand in.
RedZ
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Posted: 4/26/2010 7:42:54 AM
Wow, I didn't realize there was such a heated debate over weapons oil.

I do have quite a bit of experience using CLP on military weapons. I carried some variant of an M16 for over 20 years in the service. I fired more rounds than most soldiers, having been an Armorer, master gunner, rifle marksmanship instructor, and competed around the world in marksmanship competitions. I can honestly say I have probably fired more rounds out of a single issued M16 than most people have or will have fired in their entire lifetimes. That is a pretty bold statement, and before I get flamed––I did say Most People. With that said, I am leary to try the latest, greatest trick of the week. I have used CLP and military maintainence procedures––and they have worked for me. I am hesitant not to follow weapon manufacturer's recommendations and current published military doctrine for Military AR style weapon I am intimately familiar with.

I realize that weapons manufacturers, military, and LE have invested billions in weapons and weapons maintenance procedures and materials. They have invested and researched more than I will ever want or desire to. I also am cognizant enough to recognize that CLP may not be the "best" product there is. It is a best compromise for almost all conditions. Some of the latest synthetic lubricants may be better under certain circumstances. CLP is, however, a proven standard. It has demonstrated, under the most severe conditions, to be a single product to maintain weapons. It repels water, is heat and cold stable, and does not severly attract dirt and dust. Military weapons are used under extreme environmental conditions of temperature, dust and humidity––they are not bench rest rifles and have to be user serviceable in the field. There are all kinds of products out there, but none have the proven track record of CLP. Soldiers cannot carry bottles of bore cleaner, seperate trigger grease, bottles of lubricating oil, wiping pads, and cans of Gunscrubber––it is just too much for an already overloaded combat load––and experimenting with unknown cleaners/lubricants can be life-threatening on the two way ranges in combat zones.

The published maintenance procedures and materials for the Army are some of the best in the world. When used properly, they work. As the Cheif mentioned earlier, taking young 18 year olds off the street and turning them into marksmen is actually accomplished very well. Maintenance (both material and procedures) does work exceptionally––when it is followed. Lets be real, we have .50 cals in Iraq right now that are over 50 years old. When we turned in our 1911 .45 pistols, in the late '80s, some of the original frames were dated from the '30s and went through WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. Our M16A1s were over 20 years old when traded out for the A2s, and most spent tours in Vietnam. These weapons would not have survived if the maintenance procedures and materials did not work. Knowing that gave me faith––plus, depending on my own issued weapon through several conflicts has given me confidence in those materials and procedures.

The breakdown, or the problems that are discovered, are sort of the same as what is being discussed here. Everybody seems to have their own ideas, and think they know more than the manufacturers that make the weapons, more than the manufacturers that make the cleaning products, and more than the Army doctrine on how and what should be used. Someone somewhere decides they have a "better procedure" or some "magic cleaner or oil" to make the process easier or better. In the past, I have seen uninformed soldiers use Oven Cleaner, Bleach, Ammonia, WD-40, WIndex, Carburator Cleaner, and even Hot Water from the sink in an effort to make the cleaning task easier. Some swore that KY lube, Astroglide, and Vaseline made their weapons run better and easier to clean after live fire exercises. All of these were supposed to make the cleaning/lubrication processes easier or better, and in the end some caused more damage to the weapons than no oil or no cleaning at all.

When it comes to using a new procedure or product for cleaning and lubricating, I am very suspect if that product is not specifically made and marketed specially for weapons, and even more so, if none of the weapons manufacturers recommend it. If the people that spend the most money on weapons, maintenance, and research and development (manufacturers, military, and LE) don't use it, why would I? I do not have the money, time, or equipment to properly test alternates. If a manufacturer has created some miracle product, you can bet they have submitted to the military for testing and it has already been looked at. Not very much escapes them when it comes to adopting new products––now, the time it takes to fully test and field it, is another story. I do not mind testing new products, but on firearms that represent investments of money, and are required to have the utmost in reliability, I have to stay with proven products and let others experiment. In the meantime, I will let the military be my research agency, and when they adopt a new CLP, I will too.


JohnCollins
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Posted: 4/27/2010 9:11:34 PM
[Last Edit: 4/28/2010 7:24:26 AM by JohnCollins]
+1 to the above post.

CLP works. It may not be the 'best', but it gets the job done. If you keep your weapon wet it will run, the AR is one of the most reliable systems out there. I have to think more malfs are due to folks getting away from standard procedures.

You don't even have to keep the gun that clean. I just took a short carbine course from an instructor who had not cleaned his AR in 5,000 rounds and his ran like a scalded dog.

CLP- who cares what brand, I use FP-10 but would be happy with breakfree or other.

Remove mag, turn upside down, two drops either side of the gas tube. retract bolt, drop on top of charging handle. Release bolt, drop in each gas hole. Retract bolt carrier slightly, drop on bolt between bolt carrier and locking lugs. pull charging handle half dozen times. You will be G2G for 400 rounds or more.

Repeat.

Gun will run for a long time if you keep this up. When I clean, I used to use solvents, but I don't bother any more. I have a plastic container with lid filled with CLP, I soak the bolt, take it apart, brush with an old toothbrush, wipe with CLP soaked T-shirt, lube as above. I have a chamber brush, well-used, and clean chamber with patch around this brush.

I don't have malfunctions. We overthink this sometimes, I think. And the guys who shoot less tend to overthink it more. The instructor I just had says former special forces guy who runs famous-name school (won't name him, I don't want to repeat this with his name if it's not true) has loaner guns he does not clean for thousands of rounds. Just lubes as above and hands them to students whose guns crap out on them.

The AR is a very mature and relaible platform these days. Stop obsessing over it and shoot the damn thing.
Dan46n2
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Posted: 4/30/2010 2:04:28 AM
The Wilson stuff drys and cakes up, slip 2000 ewl is what I use now.
GAcop
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Posted: 5/1/2010 11:57:10 AM
Mix 1 quart of Mobil 1 15W50 and 1/2 quart of synthetic transmission fluid. Apply as needed. It'll make enough to lube all your weapons for a long while.
I really don't give a damn how you did it "up north".
wingo
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Posted: 5/1/2010 8:20:55 PM
I have been reading these Mobile 1 oil threads for a while. Your car is going to recommend the best oil for MPG. Thats why its always 5/30. Motul is a pure ester oil. Weight should be based on ambient temp. I've tried there gear oil, but think its a bit much unless put on a hot gun. This oil is not changed until it starts to break down which is around 15000 in a turbo motor. Mobile 1 breaks down around 3000. I have a rifle that I am trying out Mobile1 red grease on everything. In the action it never burns or cakes.

There has been way more money on R&D for motor oil than for guns. This is metal on metal lube. Spend what you want. I do use gun cleaning agents mostly. I have also run a rifle dry for aprox 3000 silverbears, rebuilt the bolt after that.

But I'm not military or a cop. Not high speed or tacticool. I do hunt pig, dog, and varmint/menace type stuff.
[NO TEXT]
Altair
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Posted: 5/3/2010 2:25:51 AM
Originally Posted By GAcop:
Mix 1 quart of Mobil 1 15W50 and 1/2 quart of synthetic transmission fluid. Apply as needed. It'll make enough to lube all your weapons for a long while.


This same mix was recently taught at a carbine instructor course at the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy. What's the deal with the transmission fluid? I hadn't heard that until that class and was wondering what it does. I'm hesitant to use motor oil at all and then they are telling us to mix it with transmission fluid.

One of these days I'm gonna run two carbines at the range, one with Slip2000 EWL and the other with this Mobil 1 15w50 / transmission fluid mix and see what happens.
We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions. --Ronald Reagan
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