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Link Posted: 5/3/2010 4:42:31 AM EST
Originally Posted By 0612Devil:
All the naysayers need to try Mobil 1 and compare it to CLP. I bet it lubes better, and lasts longer than CLP. If not, your rifle won't blow up and you're out 7 bucks. Yay...


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Link Posted: 5/3/2010 6:16:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/3/2010 6:18:21 AM EST by THUNDERKISS]
Originally Posted By Altair:
Originally Posted By GAcop:
Mix 1 quart of Mobil 1 15W50 and 1/2 quart of synthetic transmission fluid. Apply as needed. It'll make enough to lube all your weapons for a long while.


This same mix was recently taught at a carbine instructor course at the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy. What's the deal with the transmission fluid? I hadn't heard that until that class and was wondering what it does. I'm hesitant to use motor oil at all and then they are telling us to mix it with transmission fluid.

One of these days I'm gonna run two carbines at the range, one with Slip2000 EWL and the other with this Mobil 1 15w50 / transmission fluid mix and see what happens.



Since ATFs posess much lower concentrations of EP/AW/CI (extreme pressure, anti-wear, corrosion inhibitors) additives than motor oils do, I wonder what benefit those making and using this particular "mix" think that they are getting. Seems to be a rather "prolific" recipe on the 'net.

If one seeks a maximum concentration of those desireable additives, it makes little sense to dilute them with the addition of any amount of ATF.

I can only imagine that some believe that the different color (red) of ATF causes people to think that it is much different (better?) than motor oil when in fact it is simply a different dye used to help differentiate between the fluids.




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Link Posted: 5/3/2010 6:35:54 AM EST
My .02 for what it is worth.

I use Breakfree CLP because it has worked ok for me and most of the tests I have seem give it ok marks for a lube and great marks for corrosion protection.
It has been a decent cleaner for me and I like the clean,lube,protect all in one convenience.

Are there other products commercial or home brewed that work as well or a bit better? More than likely but it has been ok for my use and when I buy on line in a 16oz or larger bottle I am only using about $10 a year.

I have seen many guns that come into my friends shop or to my clubs range with lubrication problems ( I am known as the fix it guy) and it is never because they used the wrong oil , it is because they used no oil or used a ton and never cleaned.

Clean your guns from time to time and use whatever oil you like (with some grease where it is called for- like a Garand ) and don't spend half your pay check and half your waking hours searching for the one perfect gun oil. We are not launching a moon shot here , just trying to keep a couple of metal pieces sliding on one another and not rusting!

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Link Posted: 5/3/2010 6:59:05 AM EST
Originally Posted By THUNDERKISS:
Originally Posted By Altair:
Originally Posted By GAcop:
Mix 1 quart of Mobil 1 15W50 and 1/2 quart of synthetic transmission fluid. Apply as needed. It'll make enough to lube all your weapons for a long while.


This same mix was recently taught at a carbine instructor course at the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy. What's the deal with the transmission fluid? I hadn't heard that until that class and was wondering what it does. I'm hesitant to use motor oil at all and then they are telling us to mix it with transmission fluid.

One of these days I'm gonna run two carbines at the range, one with Slip2000 EWL and the other with this Mobil 1 15w50 / transmission fluid mix and see what happens.



Since ATFs posess much lower concentrations of EP/AW/CI (extreme pressure, anti-wear, corrosion inhibitors) additives than motor oils do, I wonder what benefit those making and using this particular "mix" think that they are getting. Seems to be a rather "prolific" recipe on the 'net.

If one seeks a maximum concentration of those desireable additives, it makes little sense to dilute them with the addition of any amount of ATF.

I can only imagine that some believe that the different color (red) of ATF causes people to think that it is much different (better?) than motor oil when in fact it is simply a different dye used to help differentiate between the fluids.





That's kinda what I was thinking. I just don't see what the benefit of transmission fluid would be. I would like to hear from someone who uses it to get their perspective and see what it does better than straight motor oil or gun lube.
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Link Posted: 5/3/2010 7:53:32 AM EST
ATF was used widly in the military to clean and lubricate guns....... the mix of oil and ATF would make for an excellent cleaning/lubing gun oil

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Link Posted: 5/3/2010 8:56:20 AM EST
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
ATF was used widly in the military to clean and lubricate guns....... the mix of oil and ATF would make for an excellent cleaning/lubing gun oil


I've heard this opinion but I'm looking for the specifics. What does it do that standard lube doesn't and why?
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Link Posted: 5/3/2010 3:52:55 PM EST
Originally Posted By Altair:
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
ATF was used widly in the military to clean and lubricate guns....... the mix of oil and ATF would make for an excellent cleaning/lubing gun oil


I've heard this opinion but I'm looking for the specifics. What does it do that standard lube doesn't and why?


Well being an auto technician I can give you some general but no specifics in the gun world........ ATF goes through a completely different refining process and is designed for long term use unlike motor oil to resist any buildup ...... basically it has some cleaners processed into it so crap cannot build up in an automatic trans.... while still offering lubricating properties for the trans ......... carbon buildup in a gun is similar to carbon buildup in a car.....

I have seen the internals of many transmissions and can say I have seen trans fluid burnt and broke down to severe levels but the trans still remains spotless inside except for the fact of broken down clutch fibers and friction plates that settle to the bottom of the trans pan

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Link Posted: 5/3/2010 6:06:17 PM EST
I personally believe that if you clean your firearms after everytime time you fire it you're 98% ahead of the curve.
Clean it wil Mobil 1, CLP, Rem Oil, Hoppe's, Butch's, Slip, Spit and elbow grease... Whatever. Just clean it.

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Link Posted: 5/3/2010 9:04:51 PM EST
Mobil 1 is a fine lube, don't let the "well would you run clp in your engine?" type crap discourage you. go try it out
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Link Posted: 5/4/2010 4:15:26 PM EST
Originally Posted By D_CRISIS:
Mobil 1 is a fine lube, don't let the "well would you run clp in your engine?" type crap discourage you. go try it out


I always think it's funny when people post that since basically it just points out that CLP is inferior since using it in place of motor oil in your engine would ruin the motor quickly.

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Link Posted: 5/7/2010 12:25:07 PM EST
Originally Posted By Cz357:
Originally Posted By D_CRISIS:
Mobil 1 is a fine lube, don't let the "well would you run clp in your engine?" type crap discourage you. go try it out


I always think it's funny when people post that since basically it just points out that CLP is inferior since using it in place of motor oil in your engine would ruin the motor quickly.


What you said is funny...because its true.
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Link Posted: 5/7/2010 6:57:44 PM EST
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
Originally Posted By Altair:
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
ATF was used widly in the military to clean and lubricate guns....... the mix of oil and ATF would make for an excellent cleaning/lubing gun oil


I've heard this opinion but I'm looking for the specifics. What does it do that standard lube doesn't and why?


Well being an auto technician I can give you some general but no specifics in the gun world........ ATF goes through a completely different refining process and is designed for long term use unlike motor oil to resist any buildup ...... basically it has some cleaners processed into it so crap cannot build up in an automatic trans.... while still offering lubricating properties for the trans ......... carbon buildup in a gun is similar to carbon buildup in a car.....

I have seen the internals of many transmissions and can say I have seen trans fluid burnt and broke down to severe levels but the trans still remains spotless inside except for the fact of broken down clutch fibers and friction plates that settle to the bottom of the trans pan


This is my understanding as well. To my knowledge, ATF has more detergents and dispersants in it compared to motor oil.

I run a 50/50 ATF/engine oil mix (Supertech ATF and Supertech synthetic 10w30) and have had no problems. The most I've run between cleanings is about 800 rounds.
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Link Posted: 5/8/2010 5:41:05 PM EST
Originally Posted By Blacksnake:CLP is ... a lower-cost jack of all trades, and master of NONE.
it often performs best in rust-prevention tests. so, it is sometimes the master of rust prevention.


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Link Posted: 5/8/2010 5:54:06 PM EST
Originally Posted By RedZ:...Everybody seems to have their own ideas, and think they know more than the manufacturers that make the weapons, more than the manufacturers that make the cleaning products, and more than the Army doctrine on how and what should be used....


try selling car parts. it's as bad, if not worse. the crazy things people do and say and believe is incredible. people who will not follow motor oil specs in the owner's manual.

I am pretty certain that there is a knee-jerk reaction denial gene running through many of us which prohibits is from accepting the wisdom of others.




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Link Posted: 5/8/2010 5:58:33 PM EST
Originally Posted By THUNDERKISS:...Since ATFs posess much lower concentrations of EP/AW/CI (extreme pressure, anti-wear, corrosion inhibitors) additives than motor oils do, I wonder what benefit those making and using this particular "mix" think that they are getting. Seems to be a rather "prolific" recipe on the 'net.

If one seeks a maximum concentration of those desireable additives, it makes little sense to dilute them with the addition of any amount of ATF.

I can only imagine that some believe that the different color (red) of ATF causes people to think that it is much different (better?) than motor oil when in fact it is simply a different dye used to help differentiate between the fluids.


transmission fluid was historically known for having much higher detergent levels than motor oil. so that might have someting to do with it. but i honestly think you righht re: the-red-color-is-different-so-it-must-be-better idea.


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Link Posted: 5/8/2010 10:09:15 PM EST
Originally Posted By ShakenNotStirred:
Originally Posted By crewcheif:

Just wondering why you think the military cannot clean weapons properly. Is this from personal experience, some articles you've read or perhaps a friend of a friend? Just wondering?


I'm just wondering why you can't spell "chief" (especially in your username) ... what was your GT score, and why did they let you near an aircraft? Hmm?

Did you like those questions? No, you probably didn't. Your post wasn't polite either (especially for a tech forum). You'd be eaten alive on other forums with a higher ratios of professionals/wannabes and signal/noise.

As for me, you don't need my 201 file. Ask some of the mods to contact me if you need to "verify" me. I can also provide other several other members who can verify my qualifications to speak on this issue.

Suffice it to say, I have seen, very personally and first hand, the piss-poor maintenance of weapons and equipment in the U.S. Army for quite a long time. I have also received (or be subjected to) the piss-poor guidance and instruction that is the best that most Officers and NCO's can offer when it comes to issues like marksmanship, gunfighting, weapons maintenance, ballistics, etc.



Interesting. Perhaps it is not misspelled. check out this link What Cheif really means
Pot smoker or 3rd grade speller. Maybe both?

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Link Posted: 5/9/2010 1:06:21 AM EST
Store hours 10AM to 6PM Tue-Sat Ph: 253-722-1966
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Internet sales, shipping and phone orders Mon-Fri 10AM - 6PM Ph: 253-691-6636
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Link Posted: 5/9/2010 4:06:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
Originally Posted By Altair:
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
ATF was used widly in the military to clean and lubricate guns....... the mix of oil and ATF would make for an excellent cleaning/lubing gun oil


I've heard this opinion but I'm looking for the specifics. What does it do that standard lube doesn't and why?


Well being an auto technician I can give you some general but no specifics in the gun world........ ATF goes through a completely different refining process and is designed for long term use unlike motor oil to resist any buildup ...... basically it has some cleaners processed into it so crap cannot build up in an automatic trans.... while still offering lubricating properties for the trans ......... carbon buildup in a gun is similar to carbon buildup in a car.....

I have seen the internals of many transmissions and can say I have seen trans fluid burnt and broke down to severe levels but the trans still remains spotless inside except for the fact of broken down clutch fibers and friction plates that settle to the bottom of the trans pan


Aren't those only found in manual transmissions? I thought that torque converters are purely hydraulic.


While an automatic transmission doesn't have a clutch and flywheel like you are thinking of on a manual transmission, there are still friction surfaces inside an automatic. I believe they are call clutch packs, but I'm sure someone who knows more about them will be along with the proper terminology.
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Link Posted: 5/9/2010 2:20:58 PM EST
How Stuff Works - Automatic Transmission

No mention of using CLP in it.
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Link Posted: 5/9/2010 5:58:35 PM EST
Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
Originally Posted By Altair:
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
ATF was used widly in the military to clean and lubricate guns....... the mix of oil and ATF would make for an excellent cleaning/lubing gun oil


I've heard this opinion but I'm looking for the specifics. What does it do that standard lube doesn't and why?


Well being an auto technician I can give you some general but no specifics in the gun world........ ATF goes through a completely different refining process and is designed for long term use unlike motor oil to resist any buildup ...... basically it has some cleaners processed into it so crap cannot build up in an automatic trans.... while still offering lubricating properties for the trans ......... carbon buildup in a gun is similar to carbon buildup in a car.....

I have seen the internals of many transmissions and can say I have seen trans fluid burnt and broke down to severe levels but the trans still remains spotless inside except for the fact of broken down clutch fibers and friction plates that settle to the bottom of the trans pan


Aren't those only found in manual transmissions? I thought that torque converters are purely hydraulic.


In the valve body of the auto there are all of those passageways that direct fluid up to certain clutches in the transmission locking the planetary gears in certain orders to give you your gear ranges..........the torque converter is what is responsible for locking the engine power to the trans and there is also a hydraulic pump driven by the torque converter to create hydraulic pressure in the trans to lock the clutc packs in when they are commanded to


Ever taken the clutches out of an ATV or a motorcycle ???? an auto trans looks the same they go steel/fiber/steel/fiber/steel/fiber/steel just a bunch of friction plates and fibers stacked up ....



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Link Posted: 5/9/2010 6:02:21 PM EST
Originally Posted By strat81:
How Stuff Works - Automatic Transmission

No mention of using CLP in it.


the only three things really touched in that video are the torque converter, valve body, and the planetary gear set........... an auto is a much more complicated beast than that....... with tons of channels , pressure valves , and solenoid switches (modern) , vacuum modulator (old school) , and a hydraulic pump

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Link Posted: 5/9/2010 7:41:54 PM EST
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
Originally Posted By strat81:
How Stuff Works - Automatic Transmission

No mention of using CLP in it.


the only three things really touched in that video are the torque converter, valve body, and the planetary gear set........... an auto is a much more complicated beast than that....... with tons of channels , pressure valves , and solenoid switches (modern) , vacuum modulator (old school) , and a hydraulic pump


Some of that is covered on page 12. You did click "Next Page", didn't you?
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Link Posted: 5/10/2010 7:08:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By caser:
Originally Posted By THUNDERKISS:...Since ATFs posess much lower concentrations of EP/AW/CI (extreme pressure, anti-wear, corrosion inhibitors) additives than motor oils do, I wonder what benefit those making and using this particular "mix" think that they are getting. Seems to be a rather "prolific" recipe on the 'net.

If one seeks a maximum concentration of those desireable additives, it makes little sense to dilute them with the addition of any amount of ATF.

I can only imagine that some believe that the different color (red) of ATF causes people to think that it is much different (better?) than motor oil when in fact it is simply a different dye used to help differentiate between the fluids.


transmission fluid was historically known for having much higher detergent levels than motor oil. so that might have someting to do with it. but i honestly think you righht re: the-red-color-is-different-so-it-must-be-better idea.




caser,

People oftentimes think like this. Not much we can do about it, especially with the Grant Cunningham article floating all over the 'net as it is. It is well written and comes off as "authoritative, but it is nonetheless, factually imprecise. Can one use ATF to lubricate a firearm? Sure, it'll work, but it smells "funny" and leaves red stains on your clothing that makes people think you've had some sort of a soft drink accident.

Been using M1 20w50 for 15 years now. Everyone else is free to do as they please with absolutely no static whatsoever from me.

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Link Posted: 5/11/2010 7:36:47 AM EST
Engine oil was not meant to be used as a gun lube.

FN Herstal recommends CLP that meets MIL-PRF-63460 and that is what I use for everything.

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Link Posted: 5/16/2010 1:03:41 PM EST
Originally Posted By metroplex:
Engine oil was not meant to be used as a gun lube.

FN Herstal recommends CLP that meets MIL-PRF-63460 and that is what I use for everything.


And yet it seems to do a better job than CLP at keeping things lubricated for longer periods of time.

Go figure.
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Link Posted: 5/16/2010 8:34:20 PM EST
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
Originally Posted By Altair:
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
ATF was used widly in the military to clean and lubricate guns....... the mix of oil and ATF would make for an excellent cleaning/lubing gun oil


I've heard this opinion but I'm looking for the specifics. What does it do that standard lube doesn't and why?


Well being an auto technician I can give you some general but no specifics in the gun world........ ATF goes through a completely different refining process and is designed for long term use unlike motor oil to resist any buildup ...... basically it has some cleaners processed into it so crap cannot build up in an automatic trans.... while still offering lubricating properties for the trans ......... carbon buildup in a gun is similar to carbon buildup in a car.....

I have seen the internals of many transmissions and can say I have seen trans fluid burnt and broke down to severe levels but the trans still remains spotless inside except for the fact of broken down clutch fibers and friction plates that settle to the bottom of the trans pan


Correct, being an ex auto tech my self, I learned that ATF acts as a detergent foremost.
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Link Posted: 5/17/2010 6:46:38 AM EST
There is a logical fallacy in the argument of "would you use CLP in your car." One option does not always exclude the other. For example, one could use steel wool or a nylon dish brush to scrub a standard pot. However, using the steel wool on a Teflon coated pot would damage the coating, where the nylon brush would not. The nylon brush can be used on either pot but the steel wool can not. Of course I wouldn't use CLP in my car. My car has a specific weight of oil that it requires for proper function and I have no idea what weight (viscosity rating) CLP is. This does not mean that motor oil is not a viable option for firearms. An oil could be good for both your car and your gun, or your car and not your gun, or your gun and not your car, or perhaps even not your gun and not your car (such an oil might be safe for steel but not aluminum).

Just because a manufacturer recommends a specific product does not mean that there are not products of equal or greater value available. Some auto manufactures use Moble1 while others use Castrol when either would be sufficient. My guess would be that some firearms manufactures, like Remington, might recommend a specific product because the parent company owns said product or the two companies share a business agreement. I spoke with an armorer who saw a manufacturers recommended lubricant gel and gum up because the operating environment was too cold. Dry lubes might be great for sandy and dusty environments, grease might be preferred for marine and humid environments, oil might be the best "all round" lubricant. Find what works best for your firearm and your environment and realize that it might not work for others. When in doubt follow manufacturer recommendations.

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Link Posted: 5/17/2010 3:33:20 PM EST
mobil1 will keep my bolt wet after 300 rounds of rapid fire and about 2,000+ rounds of .22lr my buddie's clp coated bolt was bone dry by his third mag
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Link Posted: 5/17/2010 4:08:35 PM EST
Well, we haven't conclusively proved that either doesn't work.

Mobil1 is cheaper, and most people will still use it in conjunction with CLP anyway.

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Link Posted: 5/19/2010 8:49:10 PM EST
After reading everyone's comments on whats to use, whats best, and who has the biggest dick. I Figrue it time to add in a few comments. Yes you should always follow you manufacutuers recomendation if you don't want to void your warranties. While going to collage for my Packageing Machinery Degree, we had a Semester course on lubricants oils and grease. OILS are base on viscosity and thier cleaning ablity, the amount of soap in it and at what temps it flows at. Grease is measured by its ablity to lubricate and at what temp ranges it start to break down at. To start off CLP stands for Cleaning Lubrication Prevenitive. MilTec is similar it has more soaps and a heavier oil ( viscosity) to it. Mobil 1 ya it is an engine oil but how many Former military or current have not hear or even seen/ used motor oil on the Ma'aw Duce! I have use a clear linthium greae called Super lube on my M-60 while out at FT. Irwin, CA a Desert enviroment and it work awsome, better than CLP beacuse it only needed a light film on the sliding surfaces. Now thier is one thing no one has even thought to mention here. THE AR-15 seaps carbon. thats why you always leave it coated with oil. NO one said you couldn't wipe it off and then lightly add Moble 1 to the sliding surfaces prior to hitting the ranges. Come on seriously PRior to ever going out on a range or out on patrol you need to inspect your rifle. THen after words it should be cleaned or and leasest whiped down with a coat of oil prior to storage. The other thing is I make my own Franken Lube for my rifle that I use out on the range, that way I get the best of all worlds. The biggest thing is depending on the enviroment you are going to use your rifle in you need to use a lubricant that will work in that enviroment.

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Link Posted: 5/20/2010 12:17:32 PM EST
I use it with great results.

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Link Posted: 5/20/2010 6:23:26 PM EST
C L P

Keep it simple, stoopid.

Get a small drip bottle so you dont have to spray and bathe whatever your applying the break-Free CLP to. I swear by CLP, as to millions of other shooters, soldiers, and smart people.

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Link Posted: 5/24/2010 4:49:42 PM EST
Why not ? Mili-tec 1 is used as an additive for almost every thing. Go read there site.
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Link Posted: 5/24/2010 9:07:07 PM EST
Which Mobil 1 Should I but for my AR? I see a lot of different ones and have no idea wich to get/don't know much about car lubes. Can someone recommend which one to purchase/ a good site to purchase it? Thanks !

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Link Posted: 5/25/2010 3:32:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By HenryHill408:
Which Mobil 1 Should I but for my AR? I see a lot of different ones and have no idea wich to get/don't know much about car lubes. Can someone recommend which one to purchase/ a good site to purchase it? Thanks !


Very generally speaking, higher weight numbers corresponds with increasing viscosity (thickness) which is what you want for higher temperature applications. Lower oil weight numbers indicate a thinner oil compatible with lower temperatures.

If you are shooting for extended periods in high temperatures weights like M1 10w40 (MX4T) and 20w50 (VTWIN) will be your best bet whereas lower temperatures might find you using a 0w20 or a 5w30.

My preferred "all around" lubricant, M1 20w50(VTWIN), has a operational temperature range of -60F to +518F and is all that I use regardless of environment, firearm type or firing session duration. I've used it for nealry fifteen years and it is a great choice for almost any application and has a very low migration rate (it doesn't run like thinner lubes) while providing very good corrosion protection.

Of course, you are not limited to Mobil 1 either. Royal Purple, Eneos, RedLine all make very high quality synthetics that'll more than suffice for this task (automotive oils are way over-engineered for use in firearms so you really cannot go wrong) so you'll need to look at the manufacturer's PDSs (product data sheets) for the information that you seek.

Do a little research, pick a few and experiment (they aren't that expensive) and get a "feel" for what works best for you.

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Link Posted: 5/28/2010 4:16:47 AM EST
For those trying to figure out what oil viscosity to use for your enviroment of use I found a chart on this web site, http://www.aa1car.com/library/motor_oil_605.htm ,

0W30 is good from + -30 to +100 F
5W30 is good from -30 to +100 F
10W30 is good from -20 to +100 F
15W30 is good from -10 to +100 F
20W30 is good from -0 to +100 F

For some of us like me that live up in the "Frozen Tundra" WI. I know this last year in the extended Deer hunting Doe season the tempsat the start of it were down -40 w/ wind chill so you will want to take into account were you are going to be using your rifle. As the temp dips your lube changes, Mil-Tech and CLP start turning into a a substance like corn suryp around -20 degrees. Useing the wrong viscosity of lube can lead to problems on your folllow up shot or protection of your weapon when useing it in extream temp condtions. It's just something to keep in mind, but over all a 5W30 would be good for just about everyone.

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Link Posted: 5/28/2010 3:54:22 PM EST
i'm using a mixture of Breakfree CLP, Slip 2000 EWL, and Motul 300V 15w50 (leftover from oil change for my bikes). I love the Motul 300V, it will keep the BCGs on my rifles wet for a really long time.

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Link Posted: 5/28/2010 4:07:05 PM EST
Yeah. I got mobil 1 in my AR. Only have to change it every 1848000 rounds.

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Link Posted: 5/29/2010 6:54:19 AM EST
It's always funny how superstitious people become over lubricants. We see this same phenominon in the car world. It's not black magic or voodoo. Comparing gun oil to car oil is almost ridiculous. Mixing cocktails of different things together without any rhyme or reason seems almost as ridiculous. Guns do not have nearly the complexity that you'll find in a car oiling system. A car engine has an oil pump, filter, many fine passages, rotating parts, reciprocating parts, emmissions requirments, and all the while being expected to run continuously for hours on end while not leaking even a drop. Engines pressurize the oil, use it for cooling and also are expected to provide all of this protection continuously with long service intervals. These are conditions that guns will never see. No one is going to run a gun continuously for 24 hours straight with three different "drivers" like a car will see on a long road trip.

Gun oil simply sits on a few metal components to lubricate them and protect them from corrosion. Try running your gun bone dry for 10 minutes and then try it with your car.

It's not rocket science and many people are "over thinking" while under analyzing. I use Hoppes, but I would sleep just as well if it was Mobil 1, CLP, Rem Oil or probably even AstroGlide on my bolt.
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Link Posted: 5/29/2010 9:21:09 AM EST
Originally Posted By Armin_Tanzarian:
I use Hoppes, but I would sleep just as well if it was Mobil 1, CLP, Rem Oil or probably even AstroGlide on my bolt.


I always assumed that the astroglide was meant more for the receiver....


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Link Posted: 5/29/2010 2:27:31 PM EST
Originally Posted By caser:
Originally Posted By Armin_Tanzarian:
I use Hoppes, but I would sleep just as well if it was Mobil 1, CLP, Rem Oil or probably even AstroGlide on my bolt.


I always assumed that the astroglide was meant more for the receiver....



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Link Posted: 5/30/2010 9:36:49 AM EST
I'll add this;

Having a quart of a synthetic lube around, in addition to the typical assortment of gun lube items, could be very useful, in a SHTF sort of way. A quart of "whatever" lube would last a very long time.

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Link Posted: 6/8/2010 10:44:01 AM EST
bump

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Link Posted: 6/25/2010 7:48:16 PM EST
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
Well being an auto technician I can give you some general but no specifics in the gun world........ ATF goes through a completely different refining process and is designed for long term use unlike motor oil to resist any buildup ...... basically it has some cleaners processed into it so crap cannot build up in an automatic trans.... while still offering lubricating properties for the trans ......... carbon buildup in a gun is similar to carbon buildup in a car.....

I have seen the internals of many transmissions and can say I have seen trans fluid burnt and broke down to severe levels but the trans still remains spotless inside except for the fact of broken down clutch fibers and friction plates that settle to the bottom of the trans pan


This is not correct. ATF is typically of lower grade oil than is motor oil. It is also thinner. The reason your transmissions look cleaner than an engine is because it is a sealed unit. Engines constantly have combustion byproducts being dumped into it and that is why you have to change your motor oil so much more often.

ATF doesn't have to contend with this.

ATF, for guns, is inferior to motor oil in every way. The fact that police agencies are teaching people to mix them is very scary.

Guns generate WAY more debris than is seen in an engine. That is why a good CLP will be formulated differently than a motor oil.

Motor oil will lube guns just fine though in most situations.


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Link Posted: 6/30/2010 10:53:59 AM EST


When yall get tired of arguing just how smart the .gov is regarding weapon care and lubrication, remember the four piece steel cleaning rod they gave you to use.




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Link Posted: 7/2/2010 12:23:48 PM EST
My .02

I use mobil 1. Never had any problems. CLP always seemed to dry up too fast. YMMV

Disclaimer: I am an occasional shooter, not a high speed, low drag tacticool operator

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Link Posted: 7/3/2010 4:22:41 AM EST
Originally Posted By Marksman14:
Originally Posted By metroplex:
Engine oil was not meant to be used as a gun lube.

FN Herstal recommends CLP that meets MIL-PRF-63460 and that is what I use for everything.


And yet it seems to do a better job than CLP at keeping things lubricated for longer periods of time.

Go figure.



Thats the thing. If it was just a matter of cost, I would stick with breakfree. But these days I dont get to the range as often as I used to, and I notice if my guns sit unused when I go to the range they are dry inside. With Mobil 1 they are as wet as the day I lubed them, even if its been months since I last got them out.

And as for cleaning, it is much easier to clean my AR after a ton of wolf when lubed with Mobil 1 compared to breakfree. No problems using it as far as function goes, whats not to like?

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Link Posted: 7/4/2010 6:29:12 AM EST

Originally Posted By colklink:
Originally Posted By Marksman14:
Originally Posted By metroplex:
Engine oil was not meant to be used as a gun lube.

FN Herstal recommends CLP that meets MIL-PRF-63460 and that is what I use for everything.


And yet it seems to do a better job than CLP at keeping things lubricated for longer periods of time.

Go figure.



Thats the thing. If it was just a matter of cost, I would stick with breakfree. But these days I dont get to the range as often as I used to, and I notice if my guns sit unused when I go to the range they are dry inside. With Mobil 1 they are as wet as the day I lubed them, even if its been months since I last got them out.

And as for cleaning, it is much easier to clean my AR after a ton of wolf when lubed with Mobil 1 compared to breakfree. No problems using it as far as function goes, whats not to like?
The smell while shooting.

I use Royal Purple 10w40 synthetic on purpose, so I'm not trying to bust your balls. I 100% agree with your statements about staying wet/lubed between range days and the easy clean-up after shooting.

But the honest answer is that some people (me included) don't like the smell.

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Link Posted: 7/4/2010 8:01:00 AM EST
Originally Posted By Tempest45:
Originally Posted By GTO_Kroh:
Well being an auto technician I can give you some general but no specifics in the gun world........ ATF goes through a completely different refining process and is designed for long term use unlike motor oil to resist any buildup ...... basically it has some cleaners processed into it so crap cannot build up in an automatic trans.... while still offering lubricating properties for the trans ......... carbon buildup in a gun is similar to carbon buildup in a car.....

I have seen the internals of many transmissions and can say I have seen trans fluid burnt and broke down to severe levels but the trans still remains spotless inside except for the fact of broken down clutch fibers and friction plates that settle to the bottom of the trans pan


This is not correct. ATF is typically of lower grade oil than is motor oil. It is also thinner. The reason your transmissions look cleaner than an engine is because it is a sealed unit. Engines constantly have combustion byproducts being dumped into it and that is why you have to change your motor oil so much more often.

ATF doesn't have to contend with this.

ATF, for guns, is inferior to motor oil in every way. The fact that police agencies are teaching people to mix them is very scary.

Guns generate WAY more debris than is seen in an engine. That is why a good CLP will be formulated differently than a motor oil.

Motor oil will lube guns just fine though in most situations.



I agree with the statement in red completely. Most of the crud in oil drained from the engine is from the combustion process.

The statement in blue I'm not sure about. I just attended an AR15 armorer's course and the instructor recommended the 2:1 mix of Mobil1 oil to Mobil1 ATF. This was a different instructor than the one that recommended th same mix in the carbine instructor school a few months back.

I figure rather than assume they or anyone on this board is right or wrong, I picked up the oil and ATF and plan to test it out shortly and decide for myself.
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Link Posted: 7/5/2010 3:06:57 AM EST
I have a Colt Ace with the floating chamber that used to freeze after 50-60 rounds, I used break free and it was better, around 100 rounds before it froze, then I tried Mobil 1 and now it will fire until my hand gets tired and the chamber will fall out when I take it apart and the carbon will wipe off with a patch.
I lube the bolt of my AR15 with Mobil 1 and the carbon wipes right off, no scrubbing required. It may not solve all lube problems, but it works well in some applications.

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