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hkusp
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Posted: 8/27/2012 10:20:51 PM
Trying to remove a barrel nut from my old A2 rifle with 16" barrel. The removal tool slides off of the nut because of the amount of torque I am applying with the breaker bar. Any suggestions ? Apply heat ?
ARJJ
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Posted: 8/27/2012 10:52:06 PM
I'd soak it in Kroil or some other penetrating oil overnight, then try again. If that doesn't work, then I'd try a little heat.
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H53EXPERT
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Posted: 8/28/2012 6:21:49 AM
If the tool is sliding off, you are not applying pressure in the proper direction. You have to be very certain to compress the delta ring completely evenly, otherwise, it will give you tool a twisting off motion instead of turning the barrel nut motion.
GHPorter
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Posted: 8/28/2012 6:47:58 AM
What H53EXPERT said... Sometimes you need an "assistant" to keep the wrench pushed against the delta ring spring.

Plus some advice: put the whole upper in the freezer for 30-45 minutes, NO MORE than 45. Take it out and immediately put it in the vise and work on that nut. Steel (the nut) and aluminum (the upper) have different thermal characteristics, so the upper should contract a bit more quickly than the nut, which will give you a little better opportunity to get the nut off. And use the longest breaker bar you can on that barrel nut wrench.

If your barrel doesn't have a pinned muzzle device, you may want to just say to heck with the barrel nut and get a plumber's pipe wrench. After breaking at least half the teeth off of one nut, I gave up, borrowed an 18" pipe wrench and it came off with my first try. Of course you have to be able to remove the FSB to be able to change out the nut, so make sure your muzzle device comes off too.
"--you can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him."
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Gregory_K
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Posted: 8/28/2012 7:02:20 AM
If the above does not work you could always have the nut milled off.
DitchDr
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Posted: 8/28/2012 12:19:23 PM
If the notches of the barrel begin to strip, stop immediatly and get a barrel nut wrench with more teeth. I reccomend the Spike's Tactical wrench. Its pricey but engages more of the notches on the nut. I ruined a barrel nut before buying the Spike's wrench.
Another-Bill
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Posted: 8/28/2012 12:32:05 PM
I've never understood why the barrel nut wrench doesn't have opposing handles instead of just one handle.

It would make it so much easier to keep a constant pressure on the delta ring.





Bill
Happiness is a warm gun,
Bang bang, shoot shoot.

The Beatles
Nov. 1968
H53EXPERT
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Posted: 8/28/2012 12:40:43 PM
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
I've never understood why the barrel nut wrench doesn't have opposing handles instead of just one handle.

It would make it so much easier to keep a constant pressure on the delta ring.





Bill


It isn't necessary. As long as you are completely seated when you start applying pressure, and apply only perpendicular force to the nut/delta ring assembly, the rotational force is enough to keep the delta ring compressed.
Another-Bill
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Posted: 8/28/2012 12:44:54 PM
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
I've never understood why the barrel nut wrench doesn't have opposing handles instead of just one handle.

It would make it so much easier to keep a constant pressure on the delta ring.





Bill


It isn't necessary. As long as you are completely seated when you start applying pressure, and apply only perpendicular force to the nut/delta ring assembly, the rotational force is enough to keep the delta ring compressed.


May not be "necessary" but it would make it easier.





Bill
Happiness is a warm gun,
Bang bang, shoot shoot.

The Beatles
Nov. 1968
H53EXPERT
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Posted: 8/28/2012 12:50:41 PM
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
I've never understood why the barrel nut wrench doesn't have opposing handles instead of just one handle.

It would make it so much easier to keep a constant pressure on the delta ring.





Bill


It isn't necessary. As long as you are completely seated when you start applying pressure, and apply only perpendicular force to the nut/delta ring assembly, the rotational force is enough to keep the delta ring compressed.


May not be "necessary" but it would make it easier.





Bill


Easier than what? It isn't hard, difficult, or trying to begin with. Place the tool and seat it all the way, then apply some pressure as if you are spinning the nut. If they made it with two handles, it would be unnecessarily and extremely long with no benefit at all.

Another-Bill
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Posted: 8/28/2012 12:53:30 PM
[Last Edit: 8/28/2012 12:55:10 PM by Another-Bill]
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
I've never understood why the barrel nut wrench doesn't have opposing handles instead of just one handle.

It would make it so much easier to keep a constant pressure on the delta ring.





Bill


It isn't necessary. As long as you are completely seated when you start applying pressure, and apply only perpendicular force to the nut/delta ring assembly, the rotational force is enough to keep the delta ring compressed.


May not be "necessary" but it would make it easier.





Bill


Easier than what? It isn't hard, difficult, or trying to begin with. Place the tool and seat it all the way, then apply some pressure as if you are spinning the nut. If they made it with two handles, it would be unnecessarily and extremely long with no benefit at all.



Well lets agree to disagree, I've installed and swapped out quite a few barrels and I think there would be a legitimate benefit.
IMHO it would make it easier to apply even force against the delta ring spring to allow the wrench to seat into the teeth better and more evenly.

Good luck,
Bill
Happiness is a warm gun,
Bang bang, shoot shoot.

The Beatles
Nov. 1968
H53EXPERT
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Posted: 8/28/2012 12:55:28 PM
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
I've never understood why the barrel nut wrench doesn't have opposing handles instead of just one handle.

It would make it so much easier to keep a constant pressure on the delta ring.





Bill


It isn't necessary. As long as you are completely seated when you start applying pressure, and apply only perpendicular force to the nut/delta ring assembly, the rotational force is enough to keep the delta ring compressed.


May not be "necessary" but it would make it easier.





Bill


Easier than what? It isn't hard, difficult, or trying to begin with. Place the tool and seat it all the way, then apply some pressure as if you are spinning the nut. If they made it with two handles, it would be unnecessarily and extremely long with no benefit at all.



Well lets agree to disagree, I've installed and swapped out quite a few barrels and I think there would be a legitimate benefit.

Good luck,
Bill


Sure. But it still doesn't make any sense. The only problem is that perpendicular pressure is not being applied. Even with two handles, if you aren't using it properly, the tool is going to slip off.
scudzuki
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Posted: 8/28/2012 10:09:02 PM
[Last Edit: 8/28/2012 10:10:47 PM by scudzuki]
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
I've never understood why the barrel nut wrench doesn't have opposing handles instead of just one handle.

It would make it so much easier to keep a constant pressure on the delta ring.





Bill


It isn't necessary. As long as you are completely seated when you start applying pressure, and apply only perpendicular force to the nut/delta ring assembly, the rotational force is enough to keep the delta ring compressed.


May not be "necessary" but it would make it easier.





Bill


Easier than what? It isn't hard, difficult, or trying to begin with. Place the tool and seat it all the way, then apply some pressure as if you are spinning the nut. If they made it with two handles, it would be unnecessarily and extremely long with no benefit at all.



Well lets agree to disagree, I've installed and swapped out quite a few barrels and I think there would be a legitimate benefit.

Good luck,
Bill


Sure. But it still doesn't make any sense. The only problem is that perpendicular pressure is not being applied. Even with two handles, if you aren't using it properly, the tool is going to slip off.


Absolutely untrue.

With 2 hands on opposite ends of such a wrench with the barrel nut in the center, it would be extremely easy to apply axial force to keep the wrench engaged with the teeth on the nut, which you can not do with a single ended wrench.

That said, I have the DPMS armorers tool and have found that once the delta ring is compressed by completely engaging the wrench, applying 10 or more ft/lbs of torque is enough to keep the wrench from being pushed off the nut by the delta ring.

Joe
H53EXPERT
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Posted: 8/29/2012 2:08:33 AM
Originally Posted By scudzuki:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
I've never understood why the barrel nut wrench doesn't have opposing handles instead of just one handle.

It would make it so much easier to keep a constant pressure on the delta ring.





Bill


It isn't necessary. As long as you are completely seated when you start applying pressure, and apply only perpendicular force to the nut/delta ring assembly, the rotational force is enough to keep the delta ring compressed.


May not be "necessary" but it would make it easier.





Bill


Easier than what? It isn't hard, difficult, or trying to begin with. Place the tool and seat it all the way, then apply some pressure as if you are spinning the nut. If they made it with two handles, it would be unnecessarily and extremely long with no benefit at all.



Well lets agree to disagree, I've installed and swapped out quite a few barrels and I think there would be a legitimate benefit.

Good luck,
Bill


Sure. But it still doesn't make any sense. The only problem is that perpendicular pressure is not being applied. Even with two handles, if you aren't using it properly, the tool is going to slip off.


Absolutely untrue.

With 2 hands on opposite ends of such a wrench with the barrel nut in the center, it would be extremely easy to apply axial force to keep the wrench engaged with the teeth on the nut, which you can not do with a single ended wrench.

That said, I have the DPMS armorers tool and have found that once the delta ring is compressed by completely engaging the wrench, applying 10 or more ft/lbs of torque is enough to keep the wrench from being pushed off the nut by the delta ring.

Joe


You would have to make the tool twice its current length, or longer, if you were to manipulate the tool by hand force and you would still fail to get the same leverage working from the front, than you currently do from the side. If you were going to use a breaker bar, you would still wind up one side, and it would be just as difficult, if not more so, trying to push on both ends equally, with one side (the breaker bar) being longer than the unnecessary side. Not to mention, there is this little thing called a barrel that would prevent you from standing in front of the assembly applying perfect axial force.

It simply doesn't make sense.
scudzuki
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Posted: 8/29/2012 8:46:07 AM
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By scudzuki:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
I've never understood why the barrel nut wrench doesn't have opposing handles instead of just one handle.

It would make it so much easier to keep a constant pressure on the delta ring.





Bill


It isn't necessary. As long as you are completely seated when you start applying pressure, and apply only perpendicular force to the nut/delta ring assembly, the rotational force is enough to keep the delta ring compressed.


May not be "necessary" but it would make it easier.





Bill


Easier than what? It isn't hard, difficult, or trying to begin with. Place the tool and seat it all the way, then apply some pressure as if you are spinning the nut. If they made it with two handles, it would be unnecessarily and extremely long with no benefit at all.



Well lets agree to disagree, I've installed and swapped out quite a few barrels and I think there would be a legitimate benefit.

Good luck,
Bill


Sure. But it still doesn't make any sense. The only problem is that perpendicular pressure is not being applied. Even with two handles, if you aren't using it properly, the tool is going to slip off.


Absolutely untrue.

With 2 hands on opposite ends of such a wrench with the barrel nut in the center, it would be extremely easy to apply axial force to keep the wrench engaged with the teeth on the nut, which you can not do with a single ended wrench.

That said, I have the DPMS armorers tool and have found that once the delta ring is compressed by completely engaging the wrench, applying 10 or more ft/lbs of torque is enough to keep the wrench from being pushed off the nut by the delta ring.

Joe


You would have to make the tool twice its current length, or longer, if you were to manipulate the tool by hand force and you would still fail to get the same leverage working from the front, than you currently do from the side. If you were going to use a breaker bar, you would still wind up one side, and it would be just as difficult, if not more so, trying to push on both ends equally, with one side (the breaker bar) being longer than the unnecessary side. Not to mention, there is this little thing called a barrel that would prevent you from standing in front of the assembly applying perfect axial force.

It simply doesn't make sense.


Unless you are unnaturally weak, you could make the wrench only slightly longer and apply the same amount of torque with both hands.

And no, you would not have to stand anywhere different than you do now to use it.

Joe