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Ekie
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Posted: 6/29/2005 4:34:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/22/2008 9:56:15 PM EST by Ekie]
Eventually the variation guide will cover much more, figured I could start with the flash suppressor and the butt stock screw, and add the other parts in between here and there, here is a start (not covering Navy rifles such as the M16A3, or Carbines).

Special thanks goes to WpnsMan his data base of early M16A1 and M16A2 rifles has been indispensable.

USGI SERIAL NUMBER DATA BASE (serial numbers listed in chronological rather then numerical order):

101-14,484
1959-1963
US Air Force/Project AGILE/SEAL issue Colt's AR-15 Model 601, roll marked ARMALITE. Some sold commercially to police departments, small numbers to foreign militaries such as Malaya, India, Australia, Burma, and Singapore.

20,000-39,999
1963-1964
US Property marked AR-15 Colt's Model 02 issued to US Advisors in Vietnam, and US Air Force. Few hundred commercial/export examples were made that lack US Property markings.

40,000-49,999
1964
US Property marked US Air Force M16 Colt's Model 604.

50,000-199,999
1964-1965
US Property marked US Air Force M16 Colt's Model 604 & US Army XM16E1 Colt's Model 603.

14,500-14,916
1965
Commercial/export CAR-15 series and US Property marked GX series for S.A.W.S. contract (note, CAR-15 refers to a family of Colt's weapons, not just short ones).

15,000-19,999
1965
Commercial/export CAR-15 series.

200,000-202,446
1965
Commercial/export CAR-15 series.

202,447-379,353
1965
US Property marked US Air Force M16 Colt's Model 604, and a few commercial export models. There are also examples of commerical/export marked models using the 20X,XXX serial number range produced in the late 1960's.

400,000 series
1966-1973 or so
Only a few rifles/carbines made in this serial number range and known examples are spread out over several years of production. Zero US Property marked rifles have been observed. Highest know example is 418,XXX and dates from the early 1970’s.

500,001-749,999
1966-1967
US Property marked XM16E1 Colt's and M16A1, both Colt Model 603. There are also a small number of US Air Force M16 Colt's Model 604 found in this serial number range. Serial numbers in this range were not run in order. M16A1’s have been observed with serial numbers as low as 604,505, and XM16E1’s have serial numbers as high as 741,12X.

750,000-752,443
1966
Experimental HBAR.

752,444-899,999
1967
US Property marked M16A1.

900,000 through 909,999
1966-1970
US Property marked Govt. Carbines.

910,000-919,999
US Property marked Colt's M16A1 and US Air Force M16 Colt's Model 604.

920,000-999,999
No known examples.

1,000,000-1,999,999
1968-1969
US Property marked Colt's M16A1

2,000,000-2,24X,XXX
1968-1971
US Property marked H&R M16A1.

3,000,000-3,469,217 (approximate)
1968-1971
US Property marked Hydramatic M16A1.

9,000,0000 series
1970’s & 1980’s
In general these are 1970’s and early 80’s “A1” type 600 series commercial/export marked weapons. There are some exceptions, for example US Property marked Govt. Carbines.

AL prefix
1970
Lebanese contract rifles, some 14,000 made.

Note on 4,000,000 series Colt’s, there are quite a few commercial/export marked rifles/carbines mixed in.

4,000,001-4,060,000
1970
US Air Force M16 Colt Model 604.

4,060,001-4,221,800
1970
US Property marked M16A1.

4,221,801-4,285,400
1970
US Air Force M16 Colt Model 604.

4,285,401-4,521,000
1970
US Property marked M16A1.

4,521,001-4,521,850
1970
US Air Force M16 Colt Model 604.

4,521,851-4,638, 400
1970
US Property marked M16A1.

4,638,401-4,643,400
1971
Model 613 for Malaysia.

4,643,401-4,701,400
1971
US Property marked M16A1.

4,701,401-4,701,900
1971
Model 613 Commando

4,701,901-4,844,400
1971
US Property marked M16A1.

4,844,401-4,849,400
1972
Model 613 for Taiwan.

4,849,401-4,926,000
1972
US Property marked M16A1.

4,926,001-4,928,000
1972
Model 613 for Philippines.

4,928,000-4,936,400
1972
US Property marked M16A1.

5,000,000-5,4X,XXX (app)
1973-1982
US Property marked M16A1 Colt's Model 603 (not aware of any Air Force M16 Colt Model 604's with serial numbers this high). Also some export/commercial models.

6,000,000-6,590,478 (approximate)
1983-1986
US Property marked M16A2 & US Property marked XM4 prototypes Colt's Model 720.

8,000,000 series
1980’s
In general these are 700 series commercial/export marked models of the M16A2.

7,000,000-7,429,766 (approximate)
1988-2003
US Property marked FN M16A2. There are also Balimoy M16A1 lowers restamped A2 in this serial number range. These were used as replacement parts by Anniston.

W prefix
1994-current
US Property marked Colt's M4/A1 Carbine, Colt's Model 920/921.

A prefix
1990’s on
900 series Commercial/export versions of the M4 Carbine.

10,000,000 serial number range
1997-
US Property marked Colt's/FN M16A4

PARTS GUIDE:

ArmaLite “duck bill” flash suppressor, this part was beefed up almost immediately after the AR-15 went into service, and was only used on the Model 01 AR-15. Apparently the tongs busted off, and they are prone to spread from gas pressure, and removal/installation.



Beefed up three prong flash suppressor, was used from 1963 through part of 1967 on late AR-15's (Model 02), the M16, XM16E1, and some early M16A1's:



Soon after M16A1 production and just prior to chrome being added to the M16A1 chamber the flash closed "bird cage" suppressor was introduced:



The M16A2 went into production with a new flash suppressor that omitted the bottom slot so as to decrease the dust signature created from firing. Also used on the M16A4):



Early lock washer on left, as used on the AR-15, XM16E1, M16, and M16A1. Middle is the A2 peel washers used to time the A2 flash suppressor to TDC on the M16A2 and early A4’s. Right is the current crush washer used on the A4 starting in 2000:



Special thanks goes to Model_One , captrichardson, tgus, and Victor Mederos (US Anodizing) for thier assistance in gathering info on 601 barrels.

Colt had no rifle barrel manufacturing capability at the time that the Colt/ArmaLite Model 601 into production in December of 1959. Model 601 barrels were made by Winchester, six groove, 1/14, and broach cut. These barrels were originally turned down to app. .565" in front of the front sight base.

This early example is stamped with two W's, one under the FSB, the other just behind the handguard cap near TDC. The M is stamped on the exposed part of the barrel between the legs of the FSB on the right side. This barrel also has a witness mark at TDC, and the gas port hole is counter bored:



Close up of the exposed M marking on the right side:



W stamping under the guards and behind the handguard cap:



Colt increased the diameter of the AR-15 barrel beyond ArmaLite's original specs during production of the Model 601. Diameter was increased from app. .565" to app. .575" in front of the front sight base. This barrel profile was carried over into 602/603/604 production. These later 601 barrels have not been observed with the counter bored gas port. Here are some examples of markings that CAN be found on these later production Model 601 barrels:

Barrel extensions were stamped stamped with a C at the 12 o'clock position:



Small upside down V stamp, can be found on either the left or right side of the barrel between the legs of the front sight base:



M&S stamping on right side between legs of the front sight base. This is probably the most common 601 barrel marking:



C in Square Colt proof mark on barrel breach:



Colt Verified Proof V&P in triangle marking on left side of the barrel between the legs of the front sight base:



M1 stamped in front of the FSB:


photo by Model_one

W near the muzzle:


photo by Model_One

While the standard 1/14 .224 barrel twist was quite successful in commercial firearms it did not serve the AR-15 well. M193 ammunition utilizes a boat tail projectile rather then the more common flat base. Boat tail bullets have less bearing surface to engage the rifling of the bore then flat base bullets of the same weight. The result was that the 55 grain FMJBT bullets were on the edge of stability when fired from the AR-15. Accuracy testing conducted by the US Army, US Air Force, and the NRA showed unacceptable accuracy with the 1/14 twist. Because of these factors a twist change to 1/12 was approved on July 26th, 1963.

Here are some examples of markings found on a 1/12 twist Model 601 barrel:


photo by tgus



photo by tgus

Model 601 production ended in 1963 and was replaced by the Model 602. The Model 601 was chambered differently then later Colt rifles. These barrels were chambered per ArmaLite specs with significantly shorter leade/throat then was used from the Colt Model 602 through current. With the exception of examples with heavily worn throats 601 barrels gauge a 0 with my commercial T/E gauge. 602 and later barrels gauge a 1.25 when new with this same gauge.

Model 602 barrel were manufactured in house were proof tested and like some 601 barrels were stamped with Colt's proof stamp a V & P in triangle (Verified Proof) on the right side, the barrel extension was also marked with a C (C stamp was used through 1965):



A "12" marking was added just over and inch from the muzzle to differentiate it from the earlier barrels. Marking was used from 1963 till the Fall of 1967:



In 1964 Colt’s began marking a M next to the VP marking meaning the barrel had been magnetic particle testing after proof firing to find potential flaws in the barrel:



By 1966 barrels were proof marked in the same spot as before, but the proof symbol was changed to a P, so they now simply read MP, with the M & P run together. This MP marking was moved by 1969.



Starting in October 1967 and prior to serial number 800,000 Colt’s added chrome to the chamber. Chrome chamber barrels are identified by a C about an inch back from the muzzle rather then the earlier 12:



Rather then being marked on the right side some H&R barrels were marked with an unside down MP on the left side. These barrels had chrome chamber, so they also had the C mark near the muzzle:



Chrome chamber barrels were also plated in the barrel extension:



By 1969 and before serial number 1,750,XXX Colt's chrome chamber barrels were marked C MP C, and the proof markings and C were moved to the same spot. This marking was used as late as 1970 or 1971 and serial number 4,552,XXX. The C means Colt’s, the M means Magnetic particle inspected, the P for Proof fired, and the C near the muzzle for Chrome chamber. (late C MP C pic provided by yfs200):



Some 1969 CMPC barrels had chrome all the way out onto the locking lugs and part of the feed ramps. 1969 CMPC barrel on right, chrome chamber and bore barrel on left:



Effective in December 1971 at about serial number 4,700,000 along with the chamber the bores were chromed, early ones were marked C MP B. The C means Colt’s, the M means Magnetic particle inspected, the P for Proof fired, and the B for chrome Bore. The barrel extention on these not chromed:



Starting in 1974 and after serial number 4,900,000 chrome bores were marked C MP CHROME BORE. This marking was used all the way until the end of M16A1 production:



M16A2/A4 barrels are marked C MP 5.56 NATO 1/7. The C MP marking means the same as before. The NATO 1/7 specifies the rifle is designed for NATO standard ammo rather then M193 as used with earlier rifles.



Sometime in the mid 1980's a star is stamped on the the barrel near the chamber area. This is probably a precursor to the later O stamp indicating a chrome chamber and bore:



Some mid 1980's barrels are stamped 885 under the handguards, meaning unkown:



Starting as early as 1989 a single or two digit code by the front sight base is used, this one marked 28. Not sure of the meaning, maybe a lot code?



As early as 1989 an O is stamped by the chamber (some look like C’s) indicating a chromed chamber/bore:



Starting in 95 a date code is stamped by the front sight base (earlist know is 02/95). First two digits is the month, second two digit number is the year, this one 03/02 (gas tube is yellow from full auto 30 round mag dumps, so yes I do shoot em):



Beginning in the late 90’s a paint mark is added in front and under the barrel nut, not sure of it’s meaning:



ArmaLite front sight base was cast. This part was used on the AR-15, and early M16, and XM16E1 rifles:



The cast front sight base was replaced by a forged part for obvious reasons. The first version of the forged front sight base was machined smooth to remove forging flash and used on M16 and XM16E1 rifles, and on the M16A1 for a time. Production started as early as 1964, and was used as late as 1969 and serial number 1,750,XXX. A bottom drain hole for the front sight post assy was added in 1967:



Later forged front sight base used on later M16/A1 rifles. These usually have a raised C and a Bell. The C and a Bell was in use by 1970, and serial number 4,500,000:



Early M16A2 front sight base same as a late A1 FSB with a C and a bell but with a .750" barrel journal. This FSB was used as late as serial number 6,210,000:



Mid to late M16A2 barrel has a raised Bfi marking inside a diamond, can be found on left or right side:


(photo by xcibes)

Colt M16A2 conversion kits/replacement barrels, M16A4 FSB's and late replacement M16A1 barrels have a jibberish forge code:



The M16A4 front sight base is similar to the late M16A2's, except that the platform the sight post screws into is higher, these are marked with an F on the left side:



Front swivels were originally bare steel, and secured with a roll pin:



Starting in 1964 the swivel is rubber coated, and was riveted on by about 1970 and serial number 4,500,000:



Early front sight post was round. One 360 degree rotation equaled 5 MOA, one click equals 1 MOA:



Current square sight post used on M16A2 and M16A4. One 360 degree rotation equaled 5 MOA, one click equals 1.25 MOA:



ArmaLite gas tubes were carbon steel. These were used on the AR-15, and on the M16/XM16E1 for a short time before switching to stainless steel:



New bend was in use by 1969 and serial number 1,750,XXX:



Since Colt did not make their own handguards and used multiple vendors, and handguards are frequently replaced on USGI rifles this is a real tough subject to pin down. I don't have dates on all of these, but do see several distinct variations. This does not come close to covering all the details, but will give you an idea.

Type A and B. Top is first production brown fiberglass, bottom is brown fiberglass painted green paint, or "B". Notice that the heatshield is different:




Type B. Far as I know all 8,500 of the Model 601's that AF General LeMay purchased were all painted green. Same story with the 1,000 601's purchased for Project AGILE. Note the highlighted area and red markings:



Close up of highlighted area:



Type C, now black impregnated. Starting in 1963 with the Colt Model 602 the furniture is black. These handguards are the same shape as the Type B, note that the highlighted area is the same as the earlier guard:



Both Type B and C handguards are frequently marked with red markings on the heat shields (Type C shown):



Type D is the same as Type C but now has a new shape in the highlighted area:



Close up of highlighted area:



Type E, same as D but now with "drain holes" added to the heat shields:



Type F handguard heat Shields are marked L and R for. There is numerous variations of these types of handguards and I am far from figuring them out:



A2 handguards were used on the A2 and the A4. They range from matte to gloss. At this point I am thinking that the gloss ones are replacement parts rather then factory original.



This A2 handguard is marked DO NOT REMOVE, mold marks are present at every circle (highlighted). Note placement of bend in shield:



This handguard is not marked DO NOT REMOVE, mold marks are present at every other circle (highlighted). Note placement of bend in shield:



This A2 handguard is marked DO NOT REMOVE, mold marks are present at every circle (highlighted). Note placement of bend in shield is at a different spot then the other two pictured above:



Starting in 1999 the heatshield tabs were glued to the handguards:

NOT PICTURED

ArmaLite handguard retaining ring used on the AR-15, M16, XM16E1, and the M16A1:



Handgaurd retaining ring used on the M16A2, and the M16A4:



ArmaLite port door. This part was used on the AR-15, and early M16 and XM16E1 rifles, and was dropped in 1964:



Later M16 and XM16E1 rifles used a new port door starting in 1964. This port door was also used on the M16A1:



The M16A2 came out with a new port door that is still in use today:



Bolt/carrier groups. Top is the early AR-15 and M16 bolt group, no forward assist cuts. Later transitional M16 bolt group is not pictured (mix of chrome and parked parts). Second down is the early XM16E1 bolt group, has added forward assist cuts. Next is the late XM16E1 and M16 and early M16A1 bolt group, now parked (transitional bolt groups are a mix of chrome and parked parts). Third from bottom is the later C marked M16/A1 bolt group. Second from bottom is the M16A2 bolt group. Bottom is the M16A4 bolt group, it is parked a lighter color:





Top three pictured carrier keys are staked with two strikes, some were done round, and other square (pictured). Bottom three carrier keys have a more secure stacking method that has been in use by 1967:



Bottom three carriers are marked with a C makers code, this went into effect in about 1967, and can be found on M16A1 carriers with serial numbers as low as 807,XXX.



Starting in the about 1995 a step was added to the carrier right behind the firing pin retaining pin.

Right view:



Left view:



ArmaLite firing pin on top, current on bottom. Old part caused slam fires, and the new Colt’s design was put into production in 1963:



Early machined ArmaLite firing pin retainer:



Current firing pin retainer:



The forward assist was first used on the XM16E1 in 1964. This part was also used on the M16A1:



A new forward assist was used on the M16A2, and was used as late as serial number 6,280,000:



Newer A2 forward assist went into production in the late 1980's. This part is still being made for use on the M16A4:



ArmaLite charging handle was cool looking, but was hard to grab onto, it was replaced at about the same time that the M16/XM16E1 went into production in 1964



ArmaLite bolt stop used on the AR-15, and early examples of the M16 and XM16E1:



Transitional bolt stop. These were used sporadically and can be found on serial numbers as low as 40,XXX in 1964 and as high as 138,XXX in 1965:


(photo by tgus)

Current bolt stop in use since 1964:



ArmaLite edgewater spring guide. This part was used in the AR-15, M16, and the XM16E1 until Dec 1966:



The spring guide was replaced with a buffer at about the time that the XM16E1 was adopted Standard A. It is still in use. There are some variation in buffers, hope to have pics up later:



Type A buttstocks were brown fiberglass and after the first 100 rifles or so they were painted green:



Type B was in use sometime before serial number 8,000, the shape of the buttstock was changed. Note the angle at the bottom where it leaves the back of the lower receiver. The rubber coated swivel on this example is a replacement part:



Type C appears to be the same thing as B but now black. This buttstock was used first on the Model 602 in 1963:



Type D is also black, but has a slightly different shape and was first used on the 604/603 in 1964:



Type E has a trap door for a cleaning kit, was introduced in 1971:



The M16A2 buttstock is about 5/8" of an inch longer then the earlier models. Because of the increased length it used a longer buttstock screw and a spacer. The swivel is mounted closer to the buttplate. This buttstock is currently used on the M16A4:



Type A, B, and C buttstocks are smaller in diameter then the receiver ring at the back of the lower:



Not only was the Type D a different shape then earlier buttstocks, it is also thicker and fits flush with the receiver extension ring. E and A2 buttstocks also fit flush:



Far right buttstock is a Type D and has a hole drilled in the front face (that white spot). Most Type D buttstocks have this feature, while the other buttstocks lack it (also note the different lower contour on the D buttstock compared to the C next to it):



Type A through D have a glued on buttplate (early examples had a ArmaLite logo):



Type E had a trap door for buttstock (there is quite a bit of variation in these buttplates and trap doors that will be covered later):



A2 buttplate is checkered along with the trap door:



Earlist version of the rear swivel rotates 360 degrees. The roll pin that retains the assy is also located in a different spot, so this swivel assy should not be interchangeable with later buttstocks. It is unclear wether or not this part was dropped from production prior to the first US Air Force contract:



Type A, B, and C buttstocks lacked a rubber coating on the swivel:

Type A:



Type C:



Type D buttstock had a rubber coated swivel starting very early in production in 1964:



Type E had a fixed rear swivel that again lacked a rubber coating:



A2 rear swivel, similar to the Type E but placed farther back, and not interchangeable:



From left;

early buttstock screw with no drain hole
first version of buttstock screw with drain hole
later drain hole screw with compound on threads
longer A2 screw
spacer used with the A2 buttstock and longer screw

uxb
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Posted: 6/29/2005 4:46:15 PM EST
Nice work, Ekie!
MuRDoC
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Posted: 6/29/2005 5:30:36 PM EST
cool man
JaketheSnake
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Posted: 6/29/2005 5:34:43 PM EST
GREAT JOB!!!
This should be made a sticky, nice photos too.
WIZZO_ARAKM14
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Posted: 6/29/2005 5:53:06 PM EST
Good info.

I didn't know there were that many differences.

Thanks for your hard work.

WIZZO
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Posted: 6/29/2005 7:17:05 PM EST
What about the straight vs. sloping Delta rings?
























































































Just kidding . Great job and very informative .


Justin
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Posted: 6/29/2005 9:39:28 PM EST
You guys think Ekie knows his Ar variations, your right!! You should see his Ak variations pics!!!
Nice job as always Ekie!!! Have you ever thought about reference book dude?? I mean the Black Rifle I and II are good, but you could seriously publish another book on the Ar and I`d be first in line to buy one!!!
Ekie
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Posted: 6/29/2005 10:10:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/29/2005 10:10:39 PM EST by Ekie]
Thanks guys, tossed that together real quick with pics I had on hand. Keep in mind this is just Edition I.


Originally Posted By CitySlicker:
What about the straight vs. sloping Delta rings?
Just kidding . Great job and very informative .
Justin



Sure, will cover that, have about 100 more parts to do, all in due time.


Originally Posted By mikeinkc:
You guys think Ekie knows his Ar variations, your right!! You should see his Ak variations pics!!!
Nice job as always Ekie!!! Have you ever thought about reference book dude?? I mean the Black Rifle I and II are good, but you could seriously publish another book on the Ar and I`d be first in line to buy one!!!



Eventually the M16 guide will look like the AK-74 guide (edition XV is done, waiting on Tantal to get it on-line), and it took many years to get it where it is now:

tantal.kalashnikov.guns.ru/variants.html

It cost plenty to gather all the parts to make these guides, and a book would be that much more. Obviously I don't think I could afford to publish or I would already be in print. It is more important to me that the info is available then that I be published.
CitySlicker
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Posted: 6/29/2005 11:55:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By Ekie:
Thanks guys, tossed that together real quick with pics I had on hand. Keep in mind this is just Edition I.


Originally Posted By CitySlicker:
What about the straight vs. sloping Delta rings?
Just kidding . Great job and very informative .
Justin



Sure, will cover that, have about 100 more parts to do, all in due time.


Originally Posted By mikeinkc:
You guys think Ekie knows his Ar variations, your right!! You should see his Ak variations pics!!!
Nice job as always Ekie!!! Have you ever thought about reference book dude?? I mean the Black Rifle I and II are good, but you could seriously publish another book on the Ar and I`d be first in line to buy one!!!



Eventually the M16 guide will look like the AK-74 guide (edition XV is done, waiting on Tantal to get it on-line), and it took many years to get it where it is now:

tantal.kalashnikov.guns.ru/variants.html

It cost plenty to gather all the parts to make these guides, and a book would be that much more. Obviously I don't think I could afford to publish or I would already be in print. It is more important to me that the info is available then that I be published.



I just tooka look at that link; a book is definately in order my friend.
You want the Sporting Purposes Clause and the '89 Import Ban repealed? Then support H.R. 1703 and call the Ways and Means Committee 2:00 PM (EST) this Tuesday at (202) 225-3625. Fight for our rights!
dpmmn
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Posted: 6/30/2005 12:56:28 AM EST
Good Job!!!!
IYAOYAS
_DR
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Posted: 6/30/2005 9:47:28 AM EST
Excellent! Thanks for taking the time to post this!


_DR
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genpowell71
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Posted: 6/30/2005 12:54:25 PM EST
Thanks for the history lesson. I grew up knowing that if you didnt learn anything then it wasnt a good day.

Its been a good day.
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Posted: 6/30/2005 3:00:33 PM EST
Ekie, wonderful contribution to our knowledge base. Do you have any idea why they replaced the solid retainer with the type used now?
Ekie
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Posted: 6/30/2005 3:02:58 PM EST
Just updated, got those handguard retaining rings in there, and we are a long way off from any talk about a book. Maybe be quite awhile before I can do a photo shoot and get more stuff posted.........
Ekie
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Posted: 6/30/2005 3:22:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By gvidon212:
Ekie, wonderful contribution to our knowledge base. Do you have any idea why they replaced the solid retainer with the type used now?



Best bet would be that the old part was expensive to make.
K1196A
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Posted: 6/30/2005 4:07:38 PM EST
Your kids don't keep you busy enough! LOL!!!

Nice work Mike!

Ekie
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Posted: 6/30/2005 4:21:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By K1196A:
Your kids don't keep you busy enough! LOL!!!

Nice work Mike!




They are out of town going to Grandma's VBS, so there you go.
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Posted: 7/1/2005 6:03:56 AM EST
Great stuff, Ekie.

The information you have provided here on AR15.com over time has proven a terrific technical, and historical reference. This M16 variation guide is a perfect example.

Thanks for sharing!
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Posted: 7/1/2005 6:11:54 AM EST
The trick is to keep breathing...
mattld
The Dude Abides...
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Posted: 7/1/2005 8:33:22 AM EST
When can we expect the same for the history of the Colt carbine models?
M4A2_L073754
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Posted: 7/1/2005 9:52:52 AM EST
Very informative, thank you.

MN
Ekie
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Posted: 7/1/2005 1:29:49 PM EST
The vast majority of those pictures were taken for other purposes, so it was not big deal just tossing that together real quick. The next update is going to require alot more work on my part.


Originally Posted By mattld:
When can we expect the same for the history of the Colt carbine models?



Sorry, no plans for a Carbine guide, can't afford too. Will probably do a M4/A1 variation guide though.
exocet
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Posted: 7/1/2005 3:12:13 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/1/2005 3:12:43 PM EST by exocet]
great stuff Ekie. Is there a way you can post the links to your different AR15 pictures threads ? thanks.
Ekie
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Posted: 7/1/2005 3:25:12 PM EST

Originally Posted By exocet:
great stuff Ekie. Is there a way you can post the links to your different AR15 pictures threads ? thanks.



The M16A1, and A2 clone threads are now in the archive, but these clone threads are still available:

AR-15 clone:

ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=118&t=238213

M4gery:

ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=118&t=231110

M4A1 clone:

ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=118&t=229465

M16A4gery

ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=118&t=234528
Ductapeman
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Posted: 7/1/2005 3:43:38 PM EST
Well done, sir. Thanks for collecting all this info in one place.

(Please note that the earliest ejection-port doors had a threaded bushing holding in that itty bitty ball retaining detent on the inside; beginning about with the M16A1 it was replaced with a crimp. A minor detail-- but they're the most fun! )

I'm really looking forward to Volume Two. With the upsurge of interest in the early rifles, this will become a tremendous resource. (Don't forget to check with morrie419 to see what he's learned about the Defense Acceptance stamps-- )
Sic Semper Tannerite!

Just because it stopped smoking doesn't mean you can pick it up. --FotBR

Brother Containment Breach of Rationality
exocet
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Posted: 7/1/2005 3:43:52 PM EST
than you very much sir !
"right click, save as" :)
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