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Patriot-104
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Posted: 2/27/2010 8:25:09 PM
This forum seems to have a lot of solid advice and well-informed members with plenty of experience. I would appreciate any input or advice you can give.

I just bought a Noveske N4 with a 14.5" cold hammer forged barrel, 1 in 7" twist, 5.56mm made of mil spec M249 machine gun barrel steel, with heavy M249 chrome lining.

I am looking for a little help in two areas, “breaking in” the barrel, and ammo.

1.) I have heard from various people and read different opinions regarding “breaking in” a barrel properly. I have heard some people say things like, fire one shot then clean the bore, fire 10 more shots then clean the bore again and keep repeating. Others have said just use quality ammo and the bore will be fine.
What is the best thing to do with the barrel I have?

2.) What is the most accurate ammo for the barrel I have? Black Hills 75gr match HP red box or blue box?

3.) What is the best grain ammo for my barrel? Larger grain shoots better in the 1/7, Right?


Thanks in advance for the help.
number1olddog
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Posted: 2/27/2010 8:29:23 PM
This has been discussed extensively. With what you have there is no break in.

1. Load 30 rd mag
2. Shoot it.
Remyrw
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Posted: 2/27/2010 8:39:33 PM
As for best ammo, there is no way anyone can tell you that ahead of time.
Higher twist rates handle heavier rounds better, but that doesn't mean a particular one will be more accurate or that a heavier one will be more accurate than a lighter, within the range that the barrel handles well. A 1:7 might be most accurate with a 55grain flat base soft point loaded by uncle fester in his basement with a hammer and vice and just ok with that 77grain ballistic tipped wonder bullet loaded to perfect tolerances by gnomes with 40th century precision equipment. Shoot a variety and see what it likes. I'd start with quality ammo in each weight range, then narrow from there if there's a distinct preference. Of course, unless you're a pretty good shot, and have suitable optics, it's going to be really hard to tell the difference between most quality ammo in that rifle at 100yds and under. Group size is likely to be more you and your aiming method than the ammo itself if you stick to high quality stuff.
jcrowl
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Posted: 2/27/2010 8:41:01 PM
[Last Edit: 2/27/2010 8:41:35 PM by jcrowl]
Just shoot it. Here is an interesting take on barrel break-in

"Gale McMillan, of McMillan Stocks fame, was one of the finest barrel-makers and benchrest shooters of all time. Here he argues that elaborate barrel break-in procedures do more harm than good.

Comments collected from Gale's Gun Forum postings.

As a barrel maker I have looked in thousands of new and used barrels with a bore scope and I will tell you that if every one followed the prescribed [one shot, one clean] break-in method, a very large number would do more harm than good. The reason you hear of the gain in accuracy is because if you chamber a barrel with a reamer that has a dull throater instead of cutting clean sharp rifling it smears a burr up on the down wind side of the rifling. It takes from one to two hundred rounds to burn this burr out and the rifle to settle down and shoot its best. Any one who chambers rifle barrels has tolerances on how dull to let the reamer get and factories let them go longer than any competent smith would.

Another tidbit to consider––take a 300 Win Mag that has a life expectancy of 1000 rounds. Use 10% of it up with your break-in procedure. For every 10 barrels the barrel-maker makes he has to make one more just to take care of the break-in. No wonder barrel-makers like to see this. Now when you flame me on this please [explain] what you think is happening to the inside of your barrel during the break in that is helping you.

Consider this: every round shot in breaking-in a barrel is one round off the life of said rifle barrel. No one has ever told me the physical reason of what happens during break-in firing. In other words what, to the number of pounds of powder shot at any given pressure, is the life of the barrel. No one has ever explained what is being accomplished by shooting and cleaning in any prescribed method. Start your barrel off with 5 rounds and clean it thoroughly and do it again. Nev Maden, a friend down under that my brother taught to make barrels was the one who came up with the [one shot one clean] break-in method. He may think he has come upon something, or he has come up with another way to sell barrels. I feel that the first shot out of a barrel is its best and every one after that deteriorates [the bore] until the barrel is gone. If some one can explain what physically takes place during break-in to modify the barrel then I may change my mind. As the physical properties of a barrel don't change because of the break-in procedures it means it's all hog wash. I am open to any suggestions that can be documented otherwise if it is just someone's opinion––forget it.

It all got started when a barrel maker that I know started putting break-in instructions in the box with each barrel he shipped a few years ago. I asked him how he figured it would help and his reply was if they shoot 100 rounds breaking in this barrel that's total life is 3000 rounds and I make 1000 barrels a year just figure how many more barrels I will get to make. He had a point; it definately will shorten the barrel life. I have been a barrel maker a fair amount of time and my barrels have set and reset benchrest world records so many times I quit keeping track (at one time they held 7 at one time) along with High Power, Silhouette, Smallbore national and world records and my instructions were to clean as often as possible preferably every 10 rounds. I inspect every barrel taken off and every new barrel before it is shipped with a bore scope and I will tell you all that I see far more barrels ruined by cleaning rods than I see worn out from normal wear and tear. I am even reading about people recommending breaking-in pistols. As if it will help their shooting ability or the guns'."

More from Gale McMillan: http://www.snipercountry.com/Articles/Barrel_BreakIn.asp
DansFlash
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Posted: 2/27/2010 9:14:48 PM
Just choot that thing then clean it just like any other rifle
"Peace is that glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading"
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plinkr415
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Posted: 2/27/2010 9:23:27 PM
Originally Posted By DansFlash:
Just choot shoot that thing then clean it just like any other rifle


+1
If an AR-15 doesn't have some form of carry handle, something's not right.
BBoyd
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Posted: 2/27/2010 9:38:14 PM
yaz, jast choot et man!!
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briansmithwins
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Posted: 2/27/2010 9:43:21 PM
Clean it, lube it, and go run a coupla hunderd rounds thru it. Then clean it again.

Have fun. BSW
Si vis pacem, para bellum.
Thefryzone
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Posted: 2/27/2010 10:54:06 PM
Welcome and good choice for your first AR.
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Catman2
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Posted: 2/28/2010 8:28:29 AM
[Last Edit: 2/28/2010 8:30:59 AM by Catman2]
I hope this lessens any guilt anyone has about being lazy with the bore brush, like me .

A more important concern should be ammo to avoid. I heard there was some commie loaded, brown box stuff who's steel bullets were harder than the barrel steel and will ruin a 4150. Anyone know of it?
sleepercaprice1
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Posted: 2/28/2010 8:46:06 AM
What does Noveske say about break-in?
RangeMstr
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Posted: 2/28/2010 9:19:14 AM
Barrel Break-In Procedures (Follow Carefully)

1. Run a wet patch through the bore.
2. Shoot till you run out of ammo.
3. Buy more ammo.
4. Shoot till you run out of ammo.
5. Clean when you feel it necessary.
6. Repeat as much as your ammo budget allows.

GHPorter
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Posted: 2/28/2010 11:22:22 AM
While the barrel for an AR* needs no break in, the RIFLE ITSELF does New parts need to be smoothed as they rub together, which requires anywhere from 200-500 rounds of at least full power .223 Remington ammunition. Which leaves out Wolf (wimpy) and some others. Brown Bear is about as mild as I'd use for breaking in the gun. Some Remington .223 is pretty wimpy too; go with Winchester White Box or something at least that hot to get everything running smoothly.

* unless it's an UBER special, hand made, rifled on the thighs of young virgin girls target barrel, that is...
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Posted: 2/28/2010 12:02:10 PM
Originally Posted By GHPorter:
While the barrel for an AR* needs no break in, the RIFLE ITSELF does New parts need to be smoothed as they rub together, which requires anywhere from 200-500 rounds of at least full power .223 Remington ammunition. Which leaves out Wolf (wimpy) and some others. Brown Bear is about as mild as I'd use for breaking in the gun. Some Remington .223 is pretty wimpy too; go with Winchester White Box or something at least that hot to get everything running smoothly.

* unless it's an UBER special, hand made, rifled on the thighs of young virgin girls target barrel, that is...



Where can I get one of those??

I my understanding is that Noveske doesn't even send a manual with their rifles, other than a US Military M16 manual, if they have them in stock. So I take it they intend you to take it to the range and just plain shoot it.