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2/23/2017 5:55:53 PM
Posted: 11/7/2001 5:39:17 AM EST
... and how did they do it? I know there are a lot of guys around here that would like to get their girlfriends/wives into shooting and are unsure as to how to introduce guns. Plus the stories are sometimes interesting. [:D] I grew up in a rural area where the boys would go hunting and the women would clean and cook what they brought back. I joke that I was wasn't allowed to touch their rifles because I might give it "woman's disease." It was actually my ex-husband that got me into shooting.... the irony was that I was qualified as gun and missile technician BEFORE I started shooting handguns and rifles. My ex was a competitive shooter and it was his passion for the sport that intrigued me. But, (as is the case with a lot of women) having not handled small arms before, I would get nervous around them. My ex would ALWAYS have a weapon out.. if not two or three or... [:D] He would clean them, dry fire, etc, usually in the evening when we were sitting and talking or watching t.v. After watching for a while, I started to handle them... he showed me how to operate the slide lock, insert and drop a mag, operate the safety, secure a weapon. All of this was before I ever went to a range. By the time I did got to the range, I was already well-versed in safety and felt comfortable with what was expected of me on the firing line. He started me off with a .22 and I very quickly moved up to my .41 magnum (it was discovered early on that I am a recoil junkie). Even though things didn't work out between he and I, he did leave me with an interest in firearms. What about the rest of y'all?
Link Posted: 11/7/2001 6:07:57 AM EST
My intro to "gaugeguns"... It was 4th of July and I was 8 years old. I was at camp with grandpa and a couple of his buddies. On the wall of the camp there was a single shot 10 GA shotgun. Being 8 years old and seeing a gun longer than I was tall was a bad combination. Needless to say, I pestered him relentlessy about shooting the thing. Eventually, Grandad got a few drinks in him, and he finally gave in and took the "gauge gun" down off the wall and handed it to me with one shell (cardboard and very old). There was only one catch...I had to shoot it off the dock out into the water. So, like a true 8 year old, I proceeded to march down to the dock. With grand dad and his buddies looking on, I walked out onto the dock and loaded the monster...aimed out into the lake and touched it off...well, when I opened my eyes I was standing neck deep in the lake! The recoil had blown me off the dock! Of course, granddad and his buddies were on the ground laughing at me...god I love that guy. BTW, he's the same guy that dared me to ride the bull..and piss on the electric fence. I think he may have taken advantage of my trust...but it was all in good fun. He's also the one that got me my first .22, 20GA etc...
Link Posted: 11/7/2001 6:24:42 AM EST
I pretty much "convince" any girlfriend I have that she needs to carry a pistol (or at least have one at home). It is usually very easy to do, even with the liberal ones, because I simply give them examples of the level of crime in their area. I point out that just because they don't want to "think about those things" doesn't mean they won't be a victim. Where I live, the PD makes it easy by posting the crime statistics by zip code on their web site. Once the girlie is appraised at just how bad things really are, she usually makes the rational choice of arming herself. The next step is to break them in by introducing them to the weapon in the most un-intimidating way possible (i.e. not on a public range). [soapbox]
Link Posted: 11/7/2001 2:13:27 PM EST
Oddly enough, it might have been my father, who was a firm believer in gun control and hated guns. I say it might have been him because after he died I found myself rethinking many positions I'd held all my life; positions that had been planted in my brain by my father and reinforced for years. I was highly motivated to try new things and extend my former boundaries. I also got divorced. Somehow, this evil little seed planted in my brain and began to tell me I was curious to learn to shoot. It was just a tiny little interest, not an important one, so nothing happened for some years. My second husband is a gun nut, and was thrilled to indulge my latent interest. It actually happened when we moved out to the country, where I could see the need for me to be as self-sufficient as possible. Shooting seemed a logical part of "country life". I'm interested in what JPPJ had to say, because his tactic would never have worked on me unless I was already very interested in learning to shoot. I don't respond well to someone telling me I need to do something in order to avoid being a victim. Show me how learning to shoot will make me a more independent person, and that will strike my fancy. Imply that I'm a potential victim, and you'll just piss me off. My interest came by itself, of its own accord, and personal fear for my own safety had nothing to do with it. I wanted to shoot a gun because I thought it would be cool, and I liked the idea of being able to safely handle something dangerous like that.
Link Posted: 11/7/2001 7:55:35 PM EST
My ex had a couple of handguns around the house. He wasn't much into it, just had them for protection. A girlfriend and I decided to take a gun safety course that was offered in our small town by our local sheriff. Since we had guns in our homes, we thought maybe we ought to know how to use them. After completion of the course, we (the class) were all invited to the range to shoot off a few rounds and practice what we had just learned. From that point on I was hooked. My friend and I became regulars at the gun range, and I turned out to be a much better shot than my ex (which he wasn't too crazy about). I have since remarried, and my new husband is a gun nut. Going to the range is one of the things that we like to do together. He is a better shot than I am, but give me time...I'm still getting used to the rifles. [;)]
Link Posted: 11/8/2001 10:00:47 AM EST
Baddog, Remember, control is not always a good thing, and it is not always a bad thing, but sometimes, it is a necessary thing . . . . [soapbox]
Link Posted: 11/8/2001 5:14:41 PM EST
My father was probably the reason I love guns, even though I never really knew him. He died when I was five, but he loved guns and hunting, and I guess it came through in my blood. It was many decades before I could get serious about shooting due to various circumstances, but it's like the desire was always there, just waiting for the right time to make itself into a huge part of my life.
Link Posted: 11/9/2001 7:48:34 AM EST
As far back as I can remember, 2 or 3 years old, I can still recall the scent of Hoppe's #9 wafting up from the dining room table, as Mom and Dad would be cleaning and researching the guns they had just added to the collection. I swear the scent of Hoppe's is as subliminal a scent to me as my first bubble bath, or Grandma's perfume. It smells like......home. By the time I was in grade school, I could field strip Lugers and P-38s, and spot cool variations for my Mom at gun shows, and direct her towards them. I began shooting at age 9 in the Englewood Police sponsered Children's Gun Club. What a thrill it was, steadying those huge heavy old single shot .22 rifles, and then getting to see how close we had actually hit! I have always loved guns and shooting. The older I got, the cooler the guns got. With Kind Regards, Hannah
Link Posted: 11/10/2001 5:15:28 PM EST
Wow. Englewood Police sponsored Children's Gun Club. Now those were the days!
Link Posted: 11/10/2001 5:19:01 PM EST
My grandfather taught me how to humt at the age of 10. I have been interested in firearms ever since.
Link Posted: 11/11/2001 11:06:56 AM EST
I have been interested in learning shooting for several years, but probably for the same cultural reasons that many other women don't start shooting, I chickened out. Then, a few months ago, a male friend of mine who knew of my interest in military history asked if I'd ever gone shooting. I said no, and he asked if I wanted to go shooting at the range one night. I jumped at the chance. My first trigger pull was on a S&W .38 revolver. I shot a 9mm CZ that night, too. I liked shooting, and found my shots were landing in decent groups, even that first night. My friend actually didn't believe me that I'd never handled a firearm before. I guess I am a natural. Anyhow, since then I bought my own handgun (Glock 19) and my own self-loading Marlin .22. My next purchase is likely to be an AR-15. I'm left-handed (and left-eye dominant) and so right-handed bolt actions are difficult to use, and with scopes mounted they're downright impossible. I am looking for a reasonably priced preowned LH bolt action, but in the meantime, I am fascinated by the AR-15/M16, which I learned was actually modified for the benefit of lefties like me (the addition of the deflector on the A2 model). I love shooting. When I go target shooting, all of the stresses of life seem to fade into the background while my only focus is that front sight. I enjoy the challenge of it, and I enjoy the people I've met. Gun people are, by and large, friendly and open-hearted people who are always happy to teach a newbie a thing or two. Men are usually a bit puzzled and then happily surprised to see a woman shooting by herself over on the end of the range. I can't wait to keep on learning. I've crossed some kind of threshold at this point, since I went out today and bought my own earmuffs. ;-)
Link Posted: 11/11/2001 12:07:41 PM EST
My late Great-Uncle Paul Lang. He was an amphib driver at Normandy and spent 3 1/2 years in the European theater. Paul was decorated for his services in the Battle of the Bulge. He was a hulk of a man but he was a true gentleman. Paul was a master gunsmith and a decorated marksman. His penchant for military history was only surpassed by his love and knowledge for firearms. He and I built several muzzle loader kits when I would stay with them over summer breaks in elementary school. We would built the kits and then we would even cast our own lead. He taught me gun safety, marksmanship, ballistics, history, chivalry, and the sport of boxing. He died in 1994 from liver failure that resulted from a botched heart bypass surgery. His last words to me were, "You are pointman now." I miss him so bad. He would have loved you guys.
Link Posted: 11/11/2001 3:55:31 PM EST
Originally Posted By Miss_Magnum: (it was discovered early on that I am a recoil junkie).
you too? [:)] it was just a couple of years ago when fiance purchased 6" revolver in .357 for home protection. it's been downhill ever since. funny, but i used to be the "what do you need ______ for?" not in a nasty way, but i just couldn't understand the need for it. i never was anti-gun. i even applauded KY's decision to repeal the ban on concealed carry (went to school in southern IN, only had Louisville stations). but now it's more like "you can have my guns when you pry them from my cold dead fingers." and i [i]love[/i] getting into gun rights discussions with people, especially females.
Link Posted: 11/11/2001 5:49:28 PM EST
I can relate. I was never really anti-gun (I grew up in Colorado, with that live-and-let-live/libertarian attitude that predominates out there) but I always asked "what do you need ___ for?" I believe a lot of pro-gun control people are just incredibly misinformed about what guns do. Two years ago, I would not have imagined that I would be in the market to buy a civilian version of the M16, but here I am. I had no idea that there were so many different types of guns and that they all work so differently. I honestly assumed that all guns were pretty much the same. Now I have a punchy little 9mm for self-defense and a .22 semiauto for plinking, and am looking for an accurate, powerful semiauto rifle I can take to the outdoor range to do some serious longer range shooting. The AR15 seems like my best option. [sniper]
Link Posted: 11/11/2001 5:56:55 PM EST
Originally Posted By Haganah: I can relate. I was never really anti-gun (I grew up in Colorado, with that live-and-let-live/libertarian attitude that predominates out there) but I always asked "what do you need ___ for?" I believe a lot of pro-gun control people are just incredibly misinformed about what guns do. Two years ago, I would not have imagined that I would be in the market to buy a civilian version of the M16, but here I am. I had no idea that there were so many different types of guns and that they all work so differently. I honestly assumed that all guns were pretty much the same. Now I have a punchy little 9mm for self-defense and a .22 semiauto for plinking, and am looking for an accurate, powerful semiauto rifle I can take to the outdoor range to do some serious longer range shooting. The AR15 seems like my best option. [sniper]
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You will definately not be sorry. I was on the fence between SKS, AK and AR. I had shot bot SKS and AK but never and AR. I was a bit worried about the price but I went out on a limb and got a Bushmaster. Now I am ready to pitch (well not really) the asian crap.
Link Posted: 11/11/2001 10:35:38 PM EST
Originally Posted By BenDover: You will definately not be sorry. I was on the fence between SKS, AK and AR. I had shot bot SKS and AK but never and AR. I was a bit worried about the price but I went out on a limb and got a Bushmaster. Now I am ready to pitch (well not really) the asian crap.
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Well, I have been on the fence trying to decide between a Ruger Mini 30 and an AR, but the general concensus of my gun-pals is that the Ruger Mini's chamber has enough tolerance built into it (for the COMBLOC round it takes) that it's not as accurate as the AR. Besides, for a little more $ than the Mini 14 or 30, I can get into an AR15 which is more accurate than either and more customizable. So I am going for the AR15. I am looking especially at Olympic, Hesse and Bushy. Anybody had any experience with these makers or have any other makers that you recommend or suggest avoiding? I am planning to get a basic 20" A2, no major frills, flattop or with a removable carry handle so I can mount a scope. [USA]
Link Posted: 11/11/2001 11:48:48 PM EST
Originally Posted By Haganah:
Originally Posted By BenDover: You will definately not be sorry. I was on the fence between SKS, AK and AR. I had shot bot SKS and AK but never and AR. I was a bit worried about the price but I went out on a limb and got a Bushmaster. Now I am ready to pitch (well not really) the asian crap.
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Well, I have been on the fence trying to decide between a Ruger Mini 30 and an AR, but the general concensus of my gun-pals is that the Ruger Mini's chamber has enough tolerance built into it (for the COMBLOC round it takes) that it's not as accurate as the AR. Besides, for a little more $ than the Mini 14 or 30, I can get into an AR15 which is more accurate than either and more customizable. So I am going for the AR15. I am looking especially at Olympic, Hesse and Bushy. Anybody had any experience with these makers or have any other makers that you recommend or suggest avoiding? I am planning to get a basic 20" A2, no major frills, flattop or with a removable carry handle so I can mount a scope. [USA]
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My first and only complete gun was a Bushmaster. I built one using Bushmaster uppers on a colt preban lower this weekend and will start on another after thanksgiving.
Link Posted: 11/12/2001 1:40:51 PM EST
If you could afford the best, get a Stoner, currently made by Knights Manufacturing, but... If not, a Bushmaster, which many prefer to the Colt. Check around on prices, which vary a great deal. Don't pay more than about $800 for a basic Bushmaster.
Link Posted: 11/15/2001 5:13:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/15/2001 5:08:49 PM EST by Troy]
Link Posted: 11/17/2001 5:40:53 AM EST
I would highly recommend Rock River Arms if you aren't so much concerned about the "name" Bushmaster (it's what the U.S. Military uses). RRA has exceptional quality and (in my opinion) a better finish on the gun...for less money. You can get a 20" A2 flattop for about $650 if you shop. If you want to build your lower, then buy a stripped lower from Gunsmoke or someone for about $110 shipped, then call Donnie Pridemore at Sableco.com up in Illinois...Donnie is a SUPER NICE GUY and will answer any and all questions. Plus, he's a Sherriff's Deputy so I like to support him in his side-business. He lives 20 minutes from the RRA factory, and has great prices.
Link Posted: 11/17/2001 2:17:13 PM EST
My dad to me and my sister shooting a 22LR in the desert when I was 8.
Link Posted: 11/17/2001 7:55:37 PM EST
Bushmaster, Armalite(eagle arms) and Rock River Arms produce the best rifles and parts. Colt? Never heard of it.
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