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Posted: 3/17/2001 4:48:05 AM EST
This is kind of off of the AR-15 subject but I was just wondering. If so what are what is the method used in the selection for pilots ? Required amount of flight time, ect.
Link Posted: 3/17/2001 6:19:13 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/17/2001 6:45:49 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/17/2001 6:59:36 AM EST
We`ve got 30 of them,15 UH-60A`s,12 UH-1H/V`s,3 OH-58A+`s. Pilot selection is by recruitment, those coming from active duty, or transferring from other states.
Link Posted: 3/17/2001 7:28:36 AM EST
My department has a Cessna 172, and we "share" a Bell OH 58 (Jet Ranger) with other local agencys and FHP. FHP provides the pilot, the observers are provided on a volunteer basis. Our Cessna is currently being flown by Naval Avaitors and a deputy from the next agency over who has a commercial license. To fly any aircraft "for hire" or as your primary job assignment requires a commercial license. The pilot of the helo is a retired Navy commander with a gazillion hours, now a Lt. with Highway Patrol. Our first pilot for the Cessna was a retired Marine Col. with 4 gazillion hours. Being here by Pensacola, we have a very large pool of experienced and retired avaitors. The biggest problem is getting someone to go through rookie school so they can be certified by the state. Esentially, each department will have different criteria. The base line is a commercial license, required by the FAA.
Link Posted: 3/17/2001 7:49:29 AM EST
Interesting, the reason I ask is because many departments train their personnel to be pilots. Many of these departments when asked state that you have to be an office to be a pilot. As a professional helicopter pilot I cannot think of one operation relating to helicopter aviation that requires any law enforcement experience and I have been doing this for 10 years now. I have seen some incredibly stupid stunts performed by low time law enforcement pilots that reflect poorly on the helicopter industry as a whole. On the other hand I have seen some incredible skill displayed such as the long line rescueof that dude from the beam crane over that fire (I think it was in Georgia). Note: this pilot was an old timer (thats a compliment) with vertical reference experience. like I said this has nothing to do with AR's but seemed like a few LEO's nationwide might be able to shed some light.
Link Posted: 3/17/2001 9:18:46 AM EST
Yes, we have a couple. Pilot selection is based on the good-ole-boy network/tit-for-tat system. same way all special details are handed out. We have lots of military pilots & even helo instructors who are flying a patrol car. The brass would rather spend a million bucks training a brown noser to fly than put the most qualified candidates in the helos.
Link Posted: 3/17/2001 9:41:23 AM EST
Gee, you don't work in florida do you ?
Link Posted: 3/17/2001 11:37:43 AM EST
The neighboring city has 2. The second one was a notar, fully equipped just short of being a cobra gunship and they were just overflowing with pride that it was bought solely with money siezed in ASSETT FORFEITURES.
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