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The Revolution
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Posted: 6/25/2009 4:44:29 AM EST
Im going to do a spray in bed liner for my truck(my dad has the spray gun and liner) but I am in charge of sanding the whol thing down. Do they make a chemical etching solution that is faster than manually sanding.

Its a pretty big bitch getting in all the cracks and indents. I cant imagine professional shops do it manually.

So whats the trick?
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Posted: 6/25/2009 4:45:53 AM EST
I thought it was good to go if you just cleaned it up real good, and put a healthy layer of liner on it.
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Posted: 6/25/2009 4:48:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By Danner130:
I thought it was good to go if you just cleaned it up real good, and put a healthy layer of liner on it.


Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.. WRONG!

You must sand/scratch all the clear coat & paint so the liner has something to stick to. Do a shitty prep job, and the liner will peel, crack & chip
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Posted: 6/25/2009 4:48:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By Danner130:
I thought it was good to go if you just cleaned it up real good, and put a healthy layer of liner on it.


I imagine a course surface would be much better than a clean glossy surface.

The bed liner we use is very tough BUT if even a spot is still glossy it tends to not bond and flakes off.

That brings up a good point though. Do Rhino and similar bed liners require a sanded surface?
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Posted: 6/25/2009 4:49:07 AM EST
I've done several of the do it yourself jobs....The better you prep the surface, the better it sticks. It will hold without much prep, but anything that bashes it will knock chunks out. I always prep them well now to save the hassle of fixing it later..
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Posted: 6/25/2009 4:51:50 AM EST
Originally Posted By Chesh97:

Originally Posted By Danner130:
I thought it was good to go if you just cleaned it up real good, and put a healthy layer of liner on it.


Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.. WRONG!

You must sand/scratch all the clear coat & paint so the liner has something to stick to. Do a shitty prep job, and the liner will peel, crack & chip


Yup. Would sandblasting it work? Just a thought.

I used simple sand paper and a few hours of work. My friend and I did both trucks the same day. We worked our asses off, and even used Castrol super clean degreaser after to make sure everything stuck. It still cracked, near the deep crevasses we couldn't get to. Mine held up pretty good, but I'd never do it again, and on my current truck, I'll have someone do it professionally.

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Posted: 6/25/2009 4:51:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By stretch415:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
I thought it was good to go if you just cleaned it up real good, and put a healthy layer of liner on it.


I imagine a course surface would be much better than a clean glossy surface.

The bed liner we use is very tough BUT if even a spot is still glossy it tends to not bond and flakes off.

That brings up a good point though. Do Rhino and similar bed liners require a sanded surface?

Yes they do. That's why it's so damn expensive to have done. All the prep work. The actual coating isn't nearly the bulk of the $575 you pay to have it done...

and just FYI, if you get it done at a shop, I would steer clear of Rhino Lining. Line-X is much better.
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Posted: 6/25/2009 4:54:43 AM EST
no kidding? You would think they would have a chemical that they could apply similar to the stuff we used in high school art class to etch(frost) glass.

The stuff my dad uses is pretty beefy and actually has some rubber type flex to it so its not so brittle
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Posted: 6/25/2009 5:01:08 AM EST
i bet you a blaster with some BIG beads/large grain would do a good job..
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Posted: 6/25/2009 6:10:37 AM EST
The deckhands on the towboat I work on use vinegar to prep painted bulkheads for re-paint. This is enamel based paint mind you but it doesn't peel off after repeated washes with a fire hose and sun exposure.
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Posted: 6/25/2009 6:12:49 AM EST
You don't need to sand it down to metal. Just scuff the clear real good with a red Scotchbrite pad so it has something to adhere to, clean it real good with dish soap and water; wipe down or let air-dry, then put down your liner.
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Posted: 6/25/2009 6:38:35 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/25/2009 6:39:03 AM EST by AndrewS]
Originally Posted By DarkCharisma:
You don't need to sand it down to metal. Just scuff the clear real good with a red Scotchbrite pad so it has something to adhere to, clean it real good with dish soap and water; wipe down or let air-dry, then put down your liner.


Exactly.


Buy one of those paint edger things on a stick and buy some adhesive sand paper. Should get you off your hands and knees. I am sure you can come up with something just as easy for the slots.
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Posted: 6/25/2009 6:40:50 AM EST
Done it once, I'll pay to have it done in the future.
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Posted: 6/25/2009 6:41:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By Shott8283:
i bet you a blaster with some BIG beads/large grain would do a good job..


This is what I was thinking. You may be able to find a place that will rent you a sand/bead blaster for a few hours.
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Posted: 6/25/2009 6:55:35 AM EST
If you sand or bead blast the bed, you'll remove the protective layer of paint and subject the bed to rust...

Just scuffing the clear coat is the way to go.

Have you considered a Bedrug? Super tough fabric with some cushion. They're custom cut for most truck beds and just as tough and durable as a spray on liner unless you're using the truck for hauling huge loads of coarse material like rock and metal.

Had a BedRug in the '06 Tacoma because the Tacoma has a 'polycarbonate' bed box that will not take a spray-on liner––no adhesion. Much better option than destroying the protective paint layer already on the bed.

http://www.bedrug.com/
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Posted: 6/25/2009 6:57:26 AM EST
You may also want to consider a quality drop-in liner.

Problem with spray in is whatever damages the liner, damages your bed.

my Pendaliner fits like a glove, and protects the bed tons better. Only downside is the liner needs to be removed periodically for cleaning to avoid rust buildup. However most drop-in liners come with some stuff to prep your bed, so it will be more resistant to rust.
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