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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
Posted: 3/14/2001 11:17:27 AM EDT
Was there a tactical reason this was incorporated into the AR design? Does it just aid in cleaning? It would seem less expensive to just make the trigger-guard part of the casting/forging of the lower receiver. I'm sure there was a reason for doing it, just curious as to why. Thanks.
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 11:21:01 AM EDT
Hello, Kevin. I see that you are from Minnesota. My best friend is a native of Thief River Falls. Go put on your heaviest winter gloves, and attempt to pull the trigger. Now swing the trigger guard down and try it again...
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 11:42:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 11:45:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2001 11:56:51 AM EDT by MindHunter]
Bud and Striker hit the nail on the head. Having lived in Alaska almost all my life and having been through a couple military arctic survival schools: Cool School/EAFB and NWTC/Northern Warfare Training Center/Ft. Greely Gloves are nice and the M-16/AR-15 can certainly be fired with big cold weather gloves. Mittens are much better for extreme cold -20 to -70F and you need to flip that puppy down for that. Before anyone Sh*t's a midget over those temps I have personally fired my carbine for 4 days at -20F we went through aprox 3000 rounds and I started the course with a cleaned, lubed (break free)only weapon and didn't clean it until after the course was over. The only malfunctions I had were shooter induced at the direction of the instructor for malfunction drills. Hunter out...
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 11:56:14 AM EDT
Bud, my farm is about 50 miles east of TRF. I work construction, so I'm usually on the road. I rent a house in the Metro(Albertville) and an apartment in St. Cloud. I just picked up my first AR at DPMS yesterday. Me and my M16s were always stationed in Goerga while in the Cavalry. No wonder we never used the pivoting trigger guard(climate). Now it's very clear. Thanks guys
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 1:18:38 PM EDT
Kevin N: OMG, is Alberville now in the METRO?!?!?!?! I'm hoping that monster eventually stops growing and stays away from my neck of the woods (Willmar). If you're ever down this way during the summer, we typically have an informal M-1 shoot once a month here. Other Mil rifles are OK, like '03s and ARs. Haven't had anyone bring in an AK, yet.
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 1:20:12 PM EDT
How do you get it to swing down?
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 1:49:29 PM EDT
Mr. K, I consider any city in the Hudson Map Book part of 'The Metro'. When I worked down there 10 yrs ago, Albertville was in the country. Now the morning rush-hour traffic begins in Mentecello. I get to battle it out tomarrow on my way to St. Paul. Attman, on the ejection side of the AR15/M16 on the trigger-guard assy, the forward pin can be pushed in to release. It will then pivot down.
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 2:12:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 3:12:18 PM EDT
The swing down winter trigger was a Stoner design originally on the early AR-10 rifles. I had a Sudanese AR-10 and it had it. Sorry Striker, but it's not just a Canadian thing [:)]. It's been on every M16 and AR made. I suppose there's some version somewhere that doesn't have it, but I've never heard of it. It works better on the M16A1 because the pistol grip doesn't have the hump in the front like the A2, so it folds flat easier. Ross
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 3:18:37 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 3:30:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Striker: On the upside..the triggers were [b] very crisp[/b][;)]
View Quote
I hear that Bro, Something you really can't explain you have to live it hehehehehehehe. At temps like that three things come to mind when you are learning to deal with it. 1)Monkey 2)Fornication 3)Football Hunter out...
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 3:39:07 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 3:39:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2001 4:01:36 PM EDT by Striker]
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 3:50:26 PM EDT
Beer Slayer, The trigger guard helps to prevent things from getting snagged on the trigger and firing the rifle accidentialy. The way I see it is that under normal conditions it does not get in the way of anything but being able to fire your rifle when you need mitts outweighs the benefit that a trigger guard offers.
Link Posted: 3/14/2001 3:59:33 PM EDT
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