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Posted: 1/9/2002 1:25:02 AM EDT
I have decided on getting a safe, made by National Security of Fort Knox. The dealers in my area both carry the size safe I want. The safe from each company is about the same size. I'm looking at the fire protection ratings here, and it says that the Fort Knox with the Reinforced Fire Door Option (RFD) gives the safe a 1680 degree for 90 min fire protection, while the National Security has a 1645? degree for 45 minute fire protection certified by Omega Point Laboratories. Fire protection is one of the priorities that I am buying this safe, and was wondering if there is any difference regarding the quality or certification standards between these two safes. Anything else I should look out for or any personal experiences? Thanks.
Link Posted: 1/9/2002 7:16:20 AM EDT
I have a National Security Magnum with the standard fire protection. It has an option of getting the 'inferno package.' 1700 degree F for 60 minutes (Omega Certification) Check out these guys too. [url]www.swiftsafes.com[/url] Good info there plus TL safes. Btw, my door on my National Security can move as much as 1/4" to 1/2" while it is locked. (Forward and back) I assume this is normal because they say the seal swells when there is a fire. Anyone else's door move like this?
Link Posted: 1/9/2002 10:23:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2002 10:33:30 AM EDT by 199]
Originally Posted By 7: ... Btw, my door on my National Security can move as much as 1/4" to 1/2" while it is locked. (Forward and back) I assume this is normal because they say the seal swells when there is a fire. Anyone else's door move like this?
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7: Doesn’t sound right to me. My safe is a Fort Knox (which I highly recommend), so this may not apply to yours – though it probably does. Stick your head inside the safe (after opening door, of course) and look along the inside edge of the doorjamb on the side that opens. You should see some form of wide headed bolt, possibly a hex bolt, which is in line with one of your locking bolts when the door is closed. By turning this wide headed bolt you can adjust how tightly your door locks up. This bolt simply takes up any play between the locking bolt and the doorjamb. [image]community.webshots.com/storage/1/v4/0/36/90/28903690SrOmrEZHjT_ph.jpg[/image] Apologies to SoCalGunner for being off topic. Edited to add that cheaper safes will simply have a similar bolt, possibly even a plactic one, along the outer edge of the doorjamb that when adjusted simply prevents the door from closing so far. A much inferior setup. For obvious reasons, I can't imagine a fire proof safe having this kind of layout.
Link Posted: 1/9/2002 4:12:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 199: Stick your head inside the safe (after opening door, of course) and look along the inside edge of the doorjamb on the side that opens. You should see some form of wide headed bolt, possibly a hex bolt, which is in line with one of your locking bolts when the door is closed. By turning this wide headed bolt you can adjust how tightly your door locks up. This bolt simply takes up any play between the locking bolt and the doorjamb.
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I have a small piece of metal which is in that position. It is bent out at an angle and it hits the bolt when the door is closed. I thought that is what it was for, but it was very tough to move. I figured if I put any strength and moved it, it could break. Well, I ended up moving it about 1/2". When the door is now closed, it is much better. Almost perfectly snug. Thanks.
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 9:52:18 AM EDT
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