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Posted: 12/17/2001 8:20:07 AM EDT
I just got an email from somebody I know that has about 100 other email addresses listed in the "to" line. It told me that their computer has a virus that was sent out to everyone in the address book. The virus is listed on the C drive as "sulfnbk.exe" and it does appear on my hardrive. The email gives instructions for how to delete the "virus" before it destroys my computer. I haven't received email from this individual in over a year, and I never opened any attached files. I'm thinking that this file has always been on my computer and this email is in fact a virus that is telling me to delete something important. Should I delete sulfnbk.exe?
Link Posted: 12/17/2001 8:26:40 AM EDT
In many years of working on the computer, I'm still waiting to see an email that talked about a virus that wasn't a hoax. This one proved to be no different. Going to Norton.com and doing a search for sulfnbk.exe brought up this: [url]http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/venc/data/sulfnbk.exe.warning.html[/url]
SULFNBK.EXE Warning Type: Hoax Description: The following hoax email was first reported in Brazil. The original email is in Portuguese; it is followed by several other versions. CAUTIONS: This particular email message is a hoax. The file that is mentioned in the hoax, however, Sulfnbk.exe, is a Microsoft Windows utility that is used to restore long file names, and like any .exe file, it can be infected by a virus that targets .exe files. The virus/worm W32.Magistr.24876@mm can arrive as an attachment named Sulfnbk.exe. The Sulfnbk.exe file used by Windows is located in the C:\Windows\Command folder. If the file is located in any other folder, or arrives as an attachment to a email message, then it is possible that the file is infected. In this case, if a scan with the latest virus definitions and with NAV set to scan all files does not detect the file as being infected, quarantine and submit the file to SARC for analysis by following the instructions in the document How to submit a file to SARC using Scan and Deliver. If you have deleted the Sulfnbk.exe file from the C:\Windows\Command folder and want to know how to restore the file, see the How to restore the Sulfnbk.exe file section at the end of this document.
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Link Posted: 12/17/2001 8:49:09 AM EDT
That's what I figured. Thanks.
Link Posted: 12/17/2001 9:41:23 AM EDT
We got that one early this year. Unknowingly, I deleted the file. How do I put it back? Tried to copy off computer here at work to a disc, but cant seem to get it to the window operating system.
Link Posted: 12/18/2001 2:46:15 AM EDT
These internet jerks would rather write malicious programs than play with womenZ? Losers...
Link Posted: 12/18/2001 3:15:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SBR7_11: We got that one early this year. Unknowingly, I deleted the file. How do I put it back? Tried to copy off computer here at work to a disc, but cant seem to get it to the window operating system.
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If you have deleted this file, restoration is optional. Sulfnbk.exe is a Microsoft Windows utility that is used to restore long file names. It is not needed for normal system operation. If you want to restore it, there is more than one way to do this. See the information that follows. NOTE: The instructions in this document are provided for your convenience. The extraction of Windows files uses Microsoft programs and commands. Symantec does not provide warranty support for or assistance with Microsoft products. If you have any questions, please see your Windows documentation or contact Microsoft. Windows Me If you are using Windows Me, you can restore the file using the System Configuration Utility. 1. Click Start and then click Run. 2. Type msconfig and then press Enter. 3. Click Extract Files. The "Extract one file from installation disk" dialog box appears. 4. In the "Specify the system file you would like to restore" box, type the following, and then click Start: c:\windows\command\sulfnbk.exe NOTE: If you installed Windows to a different location, make the appropriate substitution. The Extract File dialog box appears. 5. Next to the "Restore from" box, click Browse, and browse to the location of the Windows installation files. If they were copied to the hard drive, this is, by default, C:\Windows\Options\Install. You can also insert the Windows installation CD in the CD-ROM drive and browse to that location. 6. Click OK and follow the prompts. Windows 98 If you are using Windows 98, you can restore the file using the System File Checker. 1. Click Start and then click Run. 2. Type sfc and then press Enter. 3. Click "Extract one file from installation disk." 4. In the "Specify the system file you would like to restore" box, type the following, and then click Start: c:\windows\command\sulfnbk.exe NOTE: If you installed Windows to a different location, make the appropriate substitution. The Extract File dialog box appears. 5. Next to the "Restore from" box click Browse, and browse to the location of the Windows installation files. If they were copied to the hard drive, this is, by default, C:\Windows\Options\Cabs. You can also insert the Windows installation CD in the CD-ROM drive and browse to that location. 6. Click OK and follow the prompts
Link Posted: 12/18/2001 3:57:23 AM EDT
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