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2/23/2017 5:55:53 PM
Posted: 12/4/2001 6:55:05 AM EST
I need some help, guys. My father passed away in 1996. He was a very gifted and talented machinist. He has a three tiered tool chest chocked full of tools. Some he made and others purchased. There are calipers, of several kinds, punches, dies, referance books, hammers - you name it. This is a machinists dream chest. Would any of you all, especially DFW, members have any idea what we could do with them. We would be willing to sell them, as a whole set. We could donate them to a quality machinist school, we could ebay it. We just don't know what is best. If interested in buying, I found a replacement list and at the time the list was compiled, in 1995 or '96, there was over $4000 in tools plus chest. That does not cover all the handmade tools and cutters. If anyone has any idea or suggestions, please contact email. Thanks! Pakrat - OUT!
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 7:05:13 AM EST
If you list the tools as a group on Ebay, you are looking at 10 cents on the dollar. Home made tools are worthless on Ebay. A good Gerstner chest will bring a better price, but not by a whole lot - maybe 300 bucks tops if it is in cherry condition. A riser much less, and the roller chest - ? Save them for his Grandkids, or find an old friend who might want them. I wish my dad had saved Gramp's old tools - a foreman with a Waukegan steel and wire works.
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 7:10:58 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 7:14:32 AM EST
I'm looking for a Machinst Bible, if you have onr and are willing to part with. (Don't know what they'er worth, but willing to purchase if reasonable) Borg
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 7:26:10 AM EST
Save them for your grandchildren. You'll regret their absence later.
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 7:57:05 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 8:01:24 AM EST
Go buy a good quality Lathe And USE THEM!!!
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 8:25:54 AM EST
How much space are the tools taking up? If you absolutely gotta get rid of them due to space concerns, I could understand. But if you have plenty of space, I suggest keeping them. Your father spent a lot of time and energy to accumulate the set, and it sounds like it would be a shame to break them up. Besides, you never know when you or someone in your family might need them.
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 8:46:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/4/2001 8:50:04 AM EST by the_survivalist]
use them to make a few hundred ar15,s.. you can get 80% castings at [url]www.homestead.com/TANNERYSHOPINC/index.html[/url] not shure about the link so it might not work. it should be easy for you with the right tools. i have heard of it being done with a simple drill and other simple hand tools, so for these tiils it should be very easy. edited to add: oh you would have to keep em for yorself unless you apply for and recive class 2 ffl, and then you would have to fill out paperwork and slap a serial # on each one.
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 8:52:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By Erasmus: Save them for your grandchildren. You'll regret their absence later.
View Quote
I've got to agree. Keep the stuff.
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 10:07:58 AM EST
im wondering how it is your father managed to pass on without sharing such a unique skill with you. if it's in any way possible, i'd encourage you to learn how to use the tools and then pass them and the skills along to the grand kids. no amount of money can substitute for a gift like that.
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 10:42:03 AM EST
My mom was a machinist. Nothing interested me less. I was going to school for electronics. Now 30yrs later words like Starett, Mitutoyo, Clausing, South Bend, lath dog are in my daily vocabulary. Eventually doing the same hobby as job gets old. Electronics as a job. Ginding metal making concentrated evil is a hobby. Of course at the time I went to college we sold all here stuff. I can't afford the quality she has to it's chineesium tools for me.
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 11:05:33 AM EST
If you enjoy that type of thing, take a few courses at the local Tech College to learn how to use them.
Link Posted: 12/4/2001 4:08:41 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/5/2001 7:47:01 PM EST
It seems the consensus is to keep them. The bottom chest is a roller. The Whole set is of dark metal with felt lining in the upper cabinets drawers. How come I didn't take up his trade? My math skills are terriable and his math skills, would make your head spin. In order to be in this line of work, you got to know your figuring skills. Never took a liking for the job, the public servant thing is where my calling was. But let me tell you, I would go to his shop at UTA and watch him make the chips fly. Seeing him work a huge lathe to make the coolest things, was just mezmerizing. He was able to send several projects up into space, as part of the Star Wars project/rail gun bust. Thanks for all the suggestions. I guess we'll figure something out.
Link Posted: 12/5/2001 10:45:03 PM EST
Pakrat, I'll agree WHOLE-HEARTEDLY with the rest of the gang. Keep 'em! I don't care how bad your figger'in skills are, it can be taught relatively quickly/easily. I do this stuff for a living, and NOTHING gives me more enjoyment than having someone ask me "How the HELL did you make THAT???" When in reality it's fairly simple. If you do take it up, for a hobby anyway, be prepared to have EVERYONE and their mother asking you to fix/build/engineer something for them. And in return you can make a pretty penny! Good luck, and BTW, KEEP IT! [:D]
Link Posted: 12/5/2001 10:56:19 PM EST
Keep 'em! Learn how to use them, get a lathe, and a milling machine, and you're all set! You'd find yourself tinkering around with it just to see what you can turn out. A friend of mine has all that stuff, and you know those billet aluminum trim parts for show cars that cost big bucks, like door/window knobs, shifter knobs, etc? He makes 'em for about $10 worth of aluminum, and a few minutes' time. Keep the tools.
Link Posted: 12/5/2001 11:44:02 PM EST
I'd keep 'em, myself, but then, I attempt to machine things. If you really have no use for them, and still want to sell them, I'd suggest posting in the Usenet newsgroup "rec.crafts.metalworking". Some of the guys in that group would probably be happy to drop by and see what you have; depending on where you live, they might even have a get-together planned. Some people sell tools at the local gunshow; you could also try that route.
Link Posted: 12/6/2001 12:43:23 AM EST
I'd strongly suggest that if you have the room, keep them or you'll probably wish in 10 years that you had. Watch out for guys wanting to buy just one or two items. In no time you will have a picemeal collection that isn't at all complete. Then if you want to rebuild the set, it will cost you a bundle and you've still lost the sentimental value. Even if you think you can't learn it, take a math claass or two and give it a try. Finally, even if you don't use them, think about your own kids who may arrive on the seen in a decade or so. Your description of him sounds like you had a lot of respect for his skills. Your future young adults could benefit from this legacy.
Link Posted: 12/6/2001 12:44:51 AM EST
I'd strongly suggest that if you have the room, keep them or you'll probably wish in 10 years that you had. Watch out for guys wanting to buy just one or two items. In no time you will have a picemeal collection that isn't at all complete. Then if you want to rebuild the set, it will cost you a bundle and you've still lost the sentimental value. Even if you think you can't learn it, take a math claass or two and give it a try. Finally, even if you don't use them, think about your own kids who may arrive on the seen in a decade or so. Your description of him sounds like you had a lot of respect for his skills. Your future young adults could benefit from this legacy.
Link Posted: 12/6/2001 1:10:29 AM EST
My grandfather came from Italy...settled in pittsburgh..changed his name so he could get work as a carpenter.. When I was young and stupid I didn't care much..now that I'm older I wish we had saved more of his tools.. As it stands I use his tool box with his name on it , and a few other hand tools today. Keep the tools..maybe not for you..but to someone down the line it will help kindle a sense of family.
Link Posted: 12/6/2001 1:26:50 AM EST
I wish I had my dad's tools. He's still around, but... wait a minute. He doesn't have any tools because he never fixed anything!
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