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C-4
Memento mori
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Posted: 1/28/2008 9:55:57 PM
[Last Edit: 1/28/2008 10:02:50 PM by C-4]
I was looking up this expression and came across this:


P.S. In case you were wondering, I got inspired for the title for this post from the movie, Platoon, and an obscure Revolutionary War reference:

King: Somewhere out there is the beast and he's hungry tonight.

Chris Taylor: Have you ever gotten into a mistake that you just can't get out of, King?

King: There is a way out of everything, man. Just keep you pecker hard and your powder dry and the world will turn.*

*for those who don't get the pecker and powder reference, I believe they reference the functionary pitfalls of an American Revolutionary War pistol. I couldn't find the exact right link, but I believe, a pecker is technical term for the gun's hammer that strikes the gun powder that fires a bullet. As I understand it, during the War, soldiers often got into to trouble during hand to hand combat, as their gun would fail, primarily from one of two ways: 1/ if their powder was too damp it wouldn't ignite, or 2/ the pecker which holds the flint crumbles, and it wouldn't spark the powder. So by staying focused on these two things, keeping their powder dry and pecker hard, a soldier would stay alive in the face of the enemy.


Is the part in red true?

www.vcball.com/2005/10/congrats_jason_.html
PETER RABBIT 2008
opti12206
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Posted: 1/28/2008 9:57:10 PM
Sure seems like it is true, but what do I know.
ArimoDave
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Posted: 1/28/2008 10:10:24 PM
The hammer on a flintlock is called a Cock (after the rooster chicken). The reference is likely a miss-read or interpretation. The part that needs to be hard on a flintlock is the frizzen, else the flint won't create good sparks.
Those who sacrifice their comfort and safety to ensure the comfort and safety of their fellows have earned respect. Those who sit in that comfort and safety and lack gratitude have earned scorn. [RikWriter]
C-4
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Posted: 1/28/2008 10:46:12 PM

Originally Posted By ArimoDave:
The hammer on a flintlock is called a Cock (after the rooster chicken). The reference is likely a miss-read or interpretation. The part that needs to be hard on a flintlock is the frizzen, else the flint won't create good sparks.


So, in the quote from the movie Platoon, do you think he actually means to keep his 'pecker' hard, he means 'penis'? (I hope that didn't cum come off sounding too gay.)
PETER RABBIT 2008
AR-10
psycho zombie
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Posted: 1/28/2008 10:53:17 PM
If you keep your pecker hard too long it will fall off.

Ask me how I know...
I'm not really here

C-4
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Posted: 1/28/2008 11:01:21 PM

Originally Posted By AR-10:
If you keep your pecker hard too long it will fall off.

Ask me how I know...




Seriously, help me out here!
PETER RABBIT 2008
C-4
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Posted: 1/30/2008 9:32:46 PM
BTT

The hive must know something about this.
PETER RABBIT 2008
KT45
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Posted: 1/30/2008 9:44:24 PM
I believe that a "pecker" is a reference to the hammer on a flintlock rifle. Its movement, once the trigger is pulled, is similar to a chicken "pecking" at the ground.

A 'pecker" that has lost its temper, or was no longer "hard" (as in the steel lost its temper) would fail to properly engage the frizzen and, subsequently, fail to set-off the gun.
C-4
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Posted: 1/30/2008 9:45:23 PM

Originally Posted By KT45:
I believe that a "pecker" is a reference to the hammer on a flintlock rifle. Its movement, once the trigger is pulled, is similar to a chicken "pecking" at the ground.

A 'pecker" that has lost its temper, or was no longer "hard" (as in the steel lost its temper) would fail to properly engage the frizzen and, subsequently, fail to set-off the gun.


Cool. That definitely makes sense.
PETER RABBIT 2008
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Posted: 1/30/2008 10:31:41 PM
guys, I don't believe that "pecker" refers to the hammer of the flintlock - it is not going to lose its temper short of being in a fire....my rifle is from 1830's and all is still "hard" -- but the reference to "keep your pecker hard" refers to the tool the rifleman would use to clean out the small hole that allows fire/sparks to go from the firing pan into the barrel - thus igniting the charge behind the ball ------when your powder got wet or damp, the hole would also be clogged up......a small "pic' like device - some used porcupine quills, some had a brass or copper "pecker" - some a twig - would have to be used to insure the hole was clear and ready for the spark....... -- at times the small end of the "pecker" would break off and not fit into the hole to clear it...........size does matter
C-4
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Posted: 1/31/2008 11:57:43 AM

Originally Posted By stickbow:
guys, I don't believe that "pecker" refers to the hammer of the flintlock - it is not going to lose its temper short of being in a fire....my rifle is from 1830's and all is still "hard" -- but the reference to "keep your pecker hard" refers to the tool the rifleman would use to clean out the small hole that allows fire/sparks to go from the firing pan into the barrel - thus igniting the charge behind the ball ------when your powder got wet or damp, the hole would also be clogged up......a small "pic' like device - some used porcupine quills, some had a brass or copper "pecker" - some a twig - would have to be used to insure the hole was clear and ready for the spark....... -- at times the small end of the "pecker" would break off and not fit into the hole to clear it...........size does matter


Awesome! That is certainly a great explanation.
PETER RABBIT 2008