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Epraslick
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:22:17 PM
I have to admit, when I first heard this upon my arrival in the South, I was baffled. Now I put it down as a cultural peculiarity.

Does anyone have a theory of its origin?

NineLivez
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:25:21 PM
[Last Edit: 12/31/2007 9:25:57 PM by NineLivez]

Originally Posted By Epraslick:
I have to admit, when I first heard this upon my arrival in the South, I was baffled. Now I put it down as a cultural peculiarity.

Does anyone have a theory of its origin?



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Suppo
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:29:04 PM
Even as a Southerner, I think it is corny. We said Grandma and Grandpa when I was young, and in conversation would also use the last names (when necessary) to differentiate between the two sets of grandparents. I think "Papa" is OK for the grandfather, but all of the "Nan-nuh" and "Pee-paw" stuff is odd to me.

Another weird one is "Diddy" instead of "Daddy".
Epraslick
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:29:08 PM
There is a reference to mami and pepe as French terms for Grandparents. Cajun influence?
ultramagbrion
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:31:29 PM
O-ma and O-pa (sp?) are German IIRC.....maybe its a twist on it
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rangermonroe
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:31:52 PM
Me'mere & Pe'pere is my Frog side of the family calls grandparents.

My littlest calls my MIL Mam maw, as one of the older ones said that when they were little and the name stuck.

Probably regional.
gunneys-wife
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:33:01 PM
[Last Edit: 12/31/2007 9:44:26 PM by gunneys-wife]

Originally Posted By Epraslick:
I have to admit, when I first heard this upon my arrival in the South, I was baffled. Now I put it down as a cultural peculiarity.

Does anyone have a theory of its origin?



Hey you mean people stole my grandparents names? We are originally from Key West FL, bout as far south as you can get.

ETA here in TN it is Mamaw and Papaw

CRSinTN
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:36:56 PM
[Last Edit: 12/31/2007 9:38:37 PM by CRSinTN]
I've never heard PEE-Paw, although it would fit my Dad. My 8 month old has "annointed" him more than me, my wife, and her mom ("Nana") combined. My dad is "Papaw".
SOUTHCROSS1
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:37:36 PM
[Last Edit: 12/31/2007 9:43:36 PM by SOUTHCROSS1]
There easy words for a small child to say. A 2yo can call Grandfather Paw Paw and address him easier. The words carry down the family line. My wifes father was known as Paw Paw and mother was "nanny", my father and mother were known as grand paw and grand maw to the grand children. The names made up by the children convey love. No matter how "funny" one may think it is.

I called my father, "Deaddy" till the day he died.



It's a southern thing... *Tips Hat

Stinson342
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:39:02 PM
I have had (they have passed away) a Maw-Maw and a Paw-Paw. Really doesn't matter much, though what one calls his/her grandparents. They love(d) you and that's all that matters.
FDC
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:42:53 PM
Masshole here

I have a Grandmother and Grandfather.
I had a Granpy and have a Grammy. <---no fricken clue where that came from.

Even in Mass, I've heard all flavors of names for grandparents. Admittedly when you hit the South, where I'm at now, things get weird.
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SOUTHCROSS1
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:45:12 PM
[Last Edit: 12/31/2007 9:45:38 PM by SOUTHCROSS1]

Originally Posted By FDC:
Masshole here

Even in Mass, I've heard all flavors of names for grandparents. Admittedly when you hit the South, where I'm at now, things get weird.



LOL, I think thats weird
injun-ear
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:46:57 PM
We said "mah-maw" and "pah-paw" where I grew up. The "a" in "mah and pah" is pronounced as in "apple," while the "a" in "maw" and "paw" is pronounced as in "awful."

T
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:47:06 PM

Originally Posted By ultramagbrion:
O-ma and O-pa (sp?) are German IIRC.....maybe its a twist on it


You find similar terms in many languages. O-ma and A-pa are Korean for example.
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:49:14 PM
Tiny tots can say repetitive syllables easily, and Ma-ma is one of the first to come out.

In a family one grandmother may be called Nana, and the other Maw-maw. Not unusual. The kid isn't confused.

Southern... hmmm, I find it strange that Northerners seem to have never heard of seasonings other than salt and pepper, but you don't hear me complaining (as I reach for the Tabasco).
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Posted: 12/31/2007 9:58:51 PM
[Last Edit: 12/31/2007 10:00:11 PM by Livermush]
height=8
Originally Posted By gunneys-wife:
height=8
Originally Posted By Epraslick:
I have to admit, when I first heard this upon my arrival in the South, I was baffled. Now I put it down as a cultural peculiarity.

Does anyone have a theory of its origin?



Hey you mean people stole my grandparents names? We are originally from Key West FL, bout as far south as you can get.

ETA here in TN it is Mamaw and Papaw




That's what my grandkids call me and the wife.

As for my Grand mother we called her Grany "B" her name was Vina and us southern grandkids could not pronounce the "V" so we said "B" and it stuck. We called her that for forty years.

Gunneys-wife-I was born in Key West also. Everybody is a northerner to me also.
FightingHellfish
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Posted: 12/31/2007 10:03:29 PM
It's harder in the south, 'cause sometime Grandpa, and Dad and Uncle and Cousin could all be the same person.
Suppo
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Posted: 12/31/2007 10:10:02 PM

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
......Southern... hmmm, I find it strange that Northerners seem to have never heard of seasonings other than salt and pepper, but you don't hear me complaining (as I reach for the Tabasco).


While I'm not big on the Me-maw/Pe-paw thing, it does indeed seem that people from the North often find things down here so strange. When I was living in Ohio, everyone it the city I was in seemed so mundane. If you waived or said "Hello" to a stranger, they acted startled. To me, everyone seemed to keep to themselves more.

You're right, salt and pepper can be boring after a while.
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Posted: 12/31/2007 10:16:54 PM

Originally Posted By FightingHellfish:
It's harder in the south, 'cause sometime Grandpa, and Dad and Uncle and Cousin could all be the same person.


it occasionially happens like that in WA too. I can think of a FEW different people/families
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Posted: 12/31/2007 10:18:55 PM
My wife is teaching my grandkids to call me "Paw-paw".

"Grammy and Pawpaw".

It grates on me.
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FDC
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Posted: 12/31/2007 10:19:17 PM

Originally Posted By SOUTHCROSS1:

Originally Posted By FDC:
Masshole here

Even in Mass, I've heard all flavors of names for grandparents. Admittedly when you hit the South, where I'm at now, things get weird.



LOL, I think thats weird


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eodtech2000
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Posted: 12/31/2007 10:31:24 PM

Originally Posted By rangermonroe:
Me'mere & Pe'pere is my Frog side of the family calls grandparents.

Probably regional.


Half the State of Maine calls their Grandparents that as over half the population there are French.
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Posted: 12/31/2007 10:46:27 PM

Originally Posted By SOUTHCROSS1:
...

It's a southern thing... *Tips Hat


I quit asking about southern shit when I ran across fried pickles... and saw a truck driving over a median and up the side of an on-ramp in the mud. Apparently he missed his exit.

I can't forget Ray-Ray, in his Crown Vic with an immaculate yellow and green John Deere paint job and 22-inch wheels...

It just gets stranger from there.
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Posted: 12/31/2007 11:02:20 PM
I grew up in western Nebr.

Most of the towns had large percentages of German decent.

And everybody I knew had Grandma's and Grandpa's.
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Polupharmakos
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Posted: 12/31/2007 11:07:03 PM
Dad's parents (in NC) were Grammaw and Grampaw.

Mom's parents (in TN) were Granny and Pawpaw.

I suspect it's partly cultural, in our family it meant everyone knew who was being addressed/discussed.
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Posted: 12/31/2007 11:08:24 PM
I had a pap paw and a mam maw on my mothers side, and a pawpaw and a mawmaw on my fathers side. Gron Mere and Gron Pere are also common where I grew up in Louisiana.
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Posted: 12/31/2007 11:09:02 PM
Mine were "gamps" and "ganny."

I couldn't pronounce my "Rs"








navvet89
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Posted: 12/31/2007 11:23:26 PM

Originally Posted By injun-ear:
We said "mah-maw" and "pah-paw" where I grew up. The "a" in "mah and pah" is pronounced as in "apple," while the "a" in "maw" and "paw" is pronounced as in "awful."

T


Same here (born in Tennessee).

As someone mentioned above I've called my father "deddey" (pronounced "dead-E") all my life and will continue to do so. It's a cultural/regional thing. I guess only those raised in the South realize there are many different dialects spoken. i.e; A Texan doesn't sound the same as someone from Tennessee or South Carolina, to Carpetbaggers we all sound like "rednecks".

My own son calls his Grandparents "gramma" and "paw-paw", his relationship with all of them is a loving one and they really don't care what he uses to address them just as long as he's there.
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Posted: 12/31/2007 11:39:45 PM
[Last Edit: 12/31/2007 11:40:33 PM by Ironmaker]
My only living grandparent was Grandma.

My kids grandparents are Grammy and Pappy (my parents) and Mamaw and Papaw (the wifes parents). Whatever!
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Southernman077
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Posted: 1/1/2008 12:08:34 AM
[Last Edit: 1/1/2008 12:11:12 AM by Southernman077]
I had a memaw, pepaw, granny, papaw, mamaw, papa, and a nanny. I loved each of them. My father is also a deddy and my mother is momma no matter what. I also address others as sir or ma'am if they are older than me and in formal situations. I am proud of where I am from.
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Posted: 1/1/2008 12:14:34 AM
hey...

i had a Nana and Pop, my son has a Nana and a Grandma and a PaPaw.